Tag: Spotify

How Twitter is Expanding its Reach in Audio

In June 2020, Twitter introduced audio tweets where you can record your voice and share that audio as a tweet to your followers. A perk? These can also be listened to while you multi-task across other day-to-day activities including checking email or working on a document — comparable to a micro podcast. There’s a lot that can go unsaid or uninterpreted via text, so the platform’s goal with the offering is to bring a more human experience to conversations.

Following this, the company announced in December its own audio-based social networking product and Clubhouse rival, Spaces, was heading into beta phase. This opened the door for users to chat in real-time using voice instead of text, as they do today. The product remains in beta while the platform works out technical issues and bugs with the feature, but also the more complex issues that arise from hosting live audio, including moderation.

Fast forward to today, Twitter announced its acquisition of community-focused podcast app, Breaker. Here’s a breakdown of the latest.

What is Breaker?

Since its inception in 2016, Breaker’s mission centered around influencing the perception of audio and disrupting the norms of podcasts as audio feeds and podcast apps as productivity tools. Instead, Breaker painted a picture of podcast apps as an experience around which a community could be established. More specifically, Breaker users have the ability to like and comment on their favorite episodes, discover new podcasts that align with their passions, following friends with similar interests and taste, and share their favorite shows to their other social media platforms to spark conversation.

Creating the future of audio

Breaker co-founder Leah Culver took to Twitter sharing her eagerneses to help create the future of audio through and build out Twitter Spaces while CEO Erik Berlin emphasized his vision to help the industry redefine and reimagine traditional podcasts.

“We’re truly passionate about audio communication and we’re inspired by the ways Twitter is facilitating public conversations for people around the world,” shared Berlin in the official announcement. In his own Medium post, he shared, “We’re now inspired to go even further in re-imagining how we communicate with each other, beyond the scope of traditional podcasts.”

In a separate thread, Twitter engineering lead Michael Montano, reiterated his excitement to leverage Berlin and Culver’s backgrounds to help “improve the health of public conversation on our service.” He added, “both Erik and Leah have founded and sold startups previously and will bring an entrepreneurial spirit to our engineering organization.”

According to TechCrunch, Berlin was previously the founder and CTO at social advertising company 140 Proof — which sold to Acuity — while Culver previously founded Pownce and Grove and co-authored web technologies OAuth and oEmbed.

“As an entrepreneur she’s been out front, testing ideas on several waves of online conversation and publishing. Pownce and Convore were exciting and in many ways ahead of their times,” said Montao of Culver’s efforts to push for more open standards over the past several years.

Podcasting: the new tech battleground

With the ebbs and flows of tech, there seems to be areas that receive targeted traction. Podcasting is that space today. Look no further than the giants Amazon, Google, Apple and Spotify.

Amazon’s $300 million acquisition of Wondery, Sirius bought Stitcher for $300 million, not to mention Spotify’s purchases of Anchor, Gimlet, Parcast, Megaphone, and The Joe Rogan experience — one of the most popular shows on the scene to date. Unakin to these deals, however, Twitter’s play is unique in that its sale doesn’t center on strictly podcasts themselves and the content, rather Breaker’s sale is made up of staff and technology with the larger objective of cementing Spaces as a viable offering for marketers and users.

Feature image credit via Breaker.

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The post How Twitter is Expanding its Reach in Audio appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2021/01/how-twitter-is-expanding-its-reach-in-audio/

LinkedIn Launches Spotify Playlists for Career Development Processes

LinkedIn has launched a new series of Spotify playlists to soundtrack your professional development.

https://www.socialmediatoday.com/news/linkedin-launches-spotify-playlists-for-career-development-processes/573861/

Spotify Is Now More Personal, Greeting You With A Redesigned Customized Home



Image via Spotify

Spotify has renovated its platform’s homepage to simplify navigation and make it more personalized to subscribers. The first thing you would notice is that Spotify now greets you according to the time of the day.

There will now be a “Good Morning,” “Good Afternoon” or “Good Evening” message located at the top of the homepage.

Previously, the home screen focused on your listening history with various features like the ‘Recently Played’, ‘Your Top Podcasts’ and ‘Your Heavy Rotation’ on your homepage. The latest update will now make space for both listening history and fresh recommendations.

The six spots on top are dedicated to previously played content, while the bottom half highlights new picks that let subscribers choose whether to return to familiar favorites or to check out new ones.

Through your listening history, the top portion could recommend your favorite podcast that you stream every morning, your workout playlist or the specific album you’ve been listening to heavily this week. These playlists will be updated and change throughout the day, according to your interests and activities.

The bottom portion will display top podcasts, ‘Made For You’ playlists, new picks for exploration and more, based on your content consumption.

The new home screen began rolling out on Monday to international subscribers who have used Spotify for at least 30 days.

Ready to move in? Your new Spotify Home is here 🏠 https://t.co/ADCYkRRr40 pic.twitter.com/ZKZJ4JvNsv

— Spotify (@Spotify) March 9, 2020

[via TechCrunch, cover image via Spotify] http://www.designtaxi.com/news/408976/Spotify-Is-Now-More-Personal-Greeting-You-With-A-Redesigned-Customized-Home/

Testing, Testing: Spotify Has a “Social Listening” Feature in the Works

When Spotify shuttered its in-app messaging capabilities several years back, instead pushing song and album sharing to third-party sites, the streaming giant seemed to be making a statement on its social capacity. But a recently unearthed feature shows that they’re reintroducing communal approaches to music sharing.

According to app detective Jane Manchun Wong, Spotify is currently testing a “Social Listening” feature that allows groups of friends to create and share a near-synchronous listening experience. TechCrunch describes it: “[Social Listening] lets multiple people add songs to a queue they can all listen to. You just all scan one friend’s QR-style Spotify Social Listening code, and then anyone can add songs to the real-time playlist. Differing from their current collaborative playlists, “the user interface will show how many users are connected to the listening session, their profile image, and a code that will allow users to add music.” The tool has obvious utility for inherently communal experiences; TechRadar notes that the feature has high potential for group activities like parties or road trips. But it could also connect friends at a distance, who can also connect using a dedicated link to the always-under-construction list.

At 100 million paying subscribers and millions more listening free with ad support, Spotify is the natural music site to test out this feature. Prior attempts to facilitate synchronous listening, most notably with Turntable.fm but also through a long-forgotten Facebook feature “Listen With”, have since shuttered, leaving Spotify as the only site to offer this capability…should it be released.

Currently, only Spotify employees have access to the still-experimental capability. And there are still some kinks to work out. For example, the tool will struggle to be fully synchronous if a playlist is shared between paid Spotify users and ones who rely on ad support for their experiences- what happens to paid subscribers while other users get ads?

But even if the experience never reaches that fully synchronous pinnacle, it could grow the company’s bottom line; as TechCrunch points out, “the intimate experience of co-listening might lead to longer sessions with Spotify, boosting ad plays or subscription retention.” And from a more altruistic perspective, the rededication of Spotify to making music a communal experience is promising, encouraging even. Some of the best memories many of us have of music include sharing it with friends—if this feature makes it to market, this process could get even easier.

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http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/06/testing-testing-spotify-has-a-social-listening-feature-in-the-works/

Testing, Testing: Spotify Has a “Social Listening” Feature in the Works

When Spotify shuttered its in-app messaging capabilities several years back, instead pushing song and album sharing to third-party sites, the streaming giant seemed to be making a statement on its social capacity. But a recently unearthed feature shows that they’re reintroducing communal approaches to music sharing.

According to app detective Jane Manchun Wong, Spotify is currently testing a “Social Listening” feature that allows groups of friends to create and share a near-synchronous listening experience. TechCrunch describes it: “[Social Listening] lets multiple people add songs to a queue they can all listen to. You just all scan one friend’s QR-style Spotify Social Listening code, and then anyone can add songs to the real-time playlist. Differing from their current collaborative playlists, “the user interface will show how many users are connected to the listening session, their profile image, and a code that will allow users to add music.” The tool has obvious utility for inherently communal experiences; TechRadar notes that the feature has high potential for group activities like parties or road trips. But it could also connect friends at a distance, who can also connect using a dedicated link to the always-under-construction list.

At 100 million paying subscribers and millions more listening free with ad support, Spotify is the natural music site to test out this feature. Prior attempts to facilitate synchronous listening, most notably with Turntable.fm but also through a long-forgotten Facebook feature “Listen With”, have since shuttered, leaving Spotify as the only site to offer this capability…should it be released.

Currently, only Spotify employees have access to the still-experimental capability. And there are still some kinks to work out. For example, the tool will struggle to be fully synchronous if a playlist is shared between paid Spotify users and ones who rely on ad support for their experiences- what happens to paid subscribers while other users get ads?

But even if the experience never reaches that fully synchronous pinnacle, it could grow the company’s bottom line; as TechCrunch points out, “the intimate experience of co-listening might lead to longer sessions with Spotify, boosting ad plays or subscription retention.” And from a more altruistic perspective, the rededication of Spotify to making music a communal experience is promising, encouraging even. Some of the best memories many of us have of music include sharing it with friends—if this feature makes it to market, this process could get even easier.

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WATCH THE SMWLA 2019 PROMO

The post Testing, Testing: Spotify Has a “Social Listening” Feature in the Works appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/06/testing-testing-spotify-has-a-social-listening-feature-in-the-works/

Spotify’s Anchor Adds Voice Messages to Make Podcasts Truly Social

The era of answering your favorite podcast host’s questions by shouting into the ether is over.

Spotify’s recently acquired Anchor hasn’t stopped innovating since it was bought by the streaming giant earlier this year. And their latest feature aims to make podcasting truly social: a streamlined, accessible Voice Messages feature. “We’ve never thought about podcasting as a one-way street,” the company’s announcement opened, “but it’s always been a technical challenge to incorporate this sense of community into your show.” Voice Messages, an easy way to solicit the voice of listeners, is their solution to the challenge.

Viewers wishing to answer the call of hosts, either to address questions they posed or share feedback on recent episodes, “can leave voice messages right from any browser (even on mobile!), via any podcast app, without having to download the Anchor app.” And for podcast hosts who want to incorporate these voices, the Episode Builder function will make these recordings easy to access and add to the producer’s final product. Whether hosts choose to use it to create a Q&A-style episode, share the wide scope of listeners they have, or allow users to weigh in on forthcoming changes or topics to the series, Anchor “[believes] getting interactive with your audience opens up countless avenues for creativity.”

Lest creators worry that such input could become unwieldy, Anchor has a few limits in place. First, Voice Messages cannot exceed one minute in length. Secondly (and crucially), Voice Messages cannot be sent anonymously. “Senders will need to sign up or login to an Anchor account in order to send a message,” the company warns, “so you can see who is coming from.” This measure not only creates a connection between hosts and listeners and encourages those who want input to sign up with Anchor, but creates a sense of accountability to the words you share in this intimate capacity.

Select podcasts, including Casey Neistat & Candace Poole’s Couples Therapy, and Popular Science’s The Weirdest Thing I Learned This Week, have had the Voice Message capability, but the full capacity is being deployed this week. In the ongoing battle to make podcasting more social, Anchor’s latest update creates a crucial breach in the wall between hosts and listeners.

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http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/05/spotifys-anchor-adds-voice-messages-to-make-podcasts-truly-social/

Spotify Eyes Its First Content-Based Acquisition in Gimlet Media

Spotify has said several times in recent months that the next frontier they aim to tackle is the world of podcasting; this week, they appear to be literally putting their money where their mouth is.

The streaming service is, per Recode, in advanced talks to acquire Brooklyn-based podcasting company Gimlet Media for nearly 200 million dollars. Responsible for popular offerings like Reply All (about the complicated relationship between the internet and its users) and Crimetown (about the impact organized crime has on the cities that incubate it), as well as the recently adapted Homecoming, Gimlet also creates sponsored content for companies like Gatorade. It last raised funds in 2017, and was valued at 70 million dollars.

For Spotify, the move has a number of incentives. First, it allows the demand of podcasts to be met on its platform in new and unprecedented ways. Following the decision to allow all podcast creators to put their offerings on the platform earlier this year, listening in that genre of audio grew 175% in 2018. At CES, the company’s Head of Studios and Video Courtney Holt noted a desire to make the platform even more attractive for fans of the form—while courting new users who currently use it for music. “People who consume podcasts on Spotify are consuming more of Spotify, including music,” she said, while also touting the natural fit of another audio medium for the platform. “We’re a great audio platform, and we really wanted to focus on providing the best audio experience. We found podcasting to be a great complement to our music service.”

While Spotify has excelled in conquering the world of streaming audio, its attempts to establish a foothold in video have sputtered; here too, Gimlet may be able to help. Their first foray into the arena came with Amazon Prime’s Homecoming, a Sam Esmail-produced adaptation of their show of the same name. Starring Julia Roberts and Stephan James, the show garnered critical acclaim—and could provide an infusion of credibility for Spotify in the space.

With this blockbuster acquisition, will likely also come an influx of spending in the podcasting advertising market. In 2017, podcasting generated an estimated 315 million dollars in ad revenue, but that number is growing quickly…and it will be more attractive to do so if access to podcast offerings becomes more ubiquitous through platforms like Spotify.

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http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/02/spotify-eyes-its-first-content-based-acquisition-in-gimlet-media/

Google Maps Takes on Facebook Pages with In-App B2C Interaction

For years, the go-to space for local business communication has been Facebook Pages, and the company boasts 65 million pages to that effect as a result. But Google Maps is starting to stake their claim on this parket, as evidenced by the latest features added to the Google My Business platform.

This month, a pair of new features were added to the platform that specifically enhances the Google Maps experience for local businesses. The first, Post, goes beyond allowing a business to upload photos or menus, to add time-sensitive promotional offers. According to Business Insider, “The new Post button enables all businesses to upload photos to their profiles and create special offers and events for consumers.” Previously, business owners had no way to offer promotional details into the app; now, prospective customers don’t have to navigate away from Google Maps to see these deals.

Another feature that users now won’t have to navigate away for, is new functionality for direct messaging between businesses and consumers. These conversations previously had to be held outside the app (and currently remains the case with Facebook Pages); it is Google’s hope that allowing these communications in-app will boost their standing in their already supremely popular product. 67% of mobile navigation app users count Google Maps as their go-to app, while Facebook Pages integrates with the less commonly utilized Apple Maps.

These aren’t the first moves Google Maps has made to create a more social experience in their app. This summer. The Explore tab was added to display top events in a user’s area, as well as restaurant rankings and recommendations. October saw the debut of the Follow function for Android, where users could opt to “follow” their favorite businesses in the app. Further, their recent integration with Spotify makes a connection to music on your commute seamless as well. The name of Google Maps’ current game is “seamless,” and time will tell how these adjustments help the app evolve into a seamlessly connective experience for businesses and users alike.

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http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2018/11/google-maps-takes-on-facebook-pages-with-in-app-b2c-interaction/

Spotify Debuts Its First Analytics Tool For Music Publishers

Streaming music service Spotify just debuted Spotify Publishing Analytics, its first analytics tool built specifically for music publishers.

According to Spotify, this is their effort to take care of the needs of music publishers, a group that hasn’t been given the necessary analytics tool.

“We know that there are usually many more people involved in the creation of your favorite song than just the artist whose face appears on the billboard,” according to Spotify’s press release.

“One of our core missions at Spotify is to enable creators the opportunity to live off their art,” said Jules Parker, Head of Publishing Relations & Services, EMEA and APAC, Spotify. “The publishing community is integral in supporting the songwriters that create the music we love. With more information, publishers are empowered to make the most of the opportunities the global reach of Spotify provides, and the more information we can share with each other, the more opportunity we can help create for songwriters.”

The publishing analytics tool allows music publishers to track daily streaming stats, including playlist performance, and view data across all the songwriters on their roster. In addition, it offers insights into streams by song, songwriter and recording — how songs are doing on playlists; a way to see all the different versions of a song; and a way to export metadata to internal systems for further archival and analysis.

Spotify says that this new tool will be the first built specifically for publishers from a music streaming service, although, according to Musically.com, companies like Socan, Kobalt and Songtrust have already been providing publishers analytic tools, though not as a streaming service.

This move shows Spotify’s recognition of the fact that collecting data nowadays is more important than ever, especially for publishers, according to Patrick Joest, EVP Global Content Partnerships & Synch, BMG.

“Armed with this level of streaming data, directly from Spotify, music publishers can gain insights into new opportunities for their songwriters, more efficiently collect royalties on their behalf, and moe effectively market their works,” said Joest.

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http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2018/11/spotify-debuts-its-first-analytics-tool-for-music-publishers/

YouTube Goes to the Dark Side for Help With Its Label Fight

For most of the past year, YouTube has been fighting the music industry’s attempts to paint it as a cheapskate, and even a scofflaw, a haven for unfettered copyright infringement. The company, which has been part of Alphabet’s Google goog operation for the past decade, has done its best to argue that these criticisms are…

http://fortune.com/2016/09/29/youtube-label-fight/