Tag: SMWLA

3 Ways to Bring Humanity Back to Marketing at #SMWLA

Marketers today must fundamentally rethink their efforts and resist the urge to remain static and in the confines of the status quo. We’ve spent a decade building the systems, platforms, etc. and measure engagement but now is the time to regroup and get back to the basics: humanity.

During #SMWLA, we’re diving into this topic with several key leaders in the space who will share case studies, insights and tips for connecting emotionally with people to build a maintain a community of loyal customers and not lose sight of their audiences as people.

The sessions below are just a small sample of what we have programmed to help us explore the power and importance of getting back to the reasons why marketing is a force for good and the tools and mechanisms by which we can enable this to happen.

Why Influencers Are Key to Bringing the Human Voice Back to Marketing

Influencers have ushered their way into marketers’ toolkits but the larger question they continue to present is how can they help us authentically integrate the human voice and experience into our storytelling and campaigns? In 2020 and beyond it will be key to challenge the norm and resist an extractive approach to how we engage consumers.

Learn how to shape your strategy so that it is genuine and provides content that is valuable and equitable for your audience in a panel led by Tulani Elisa, VP of Social Media at FOX Entertainment.

Making Mission Your Message

In today’s mobile-first world, where we spend our time and our attention impacts much more than what we buy and how much we spend. As a result, we must ensure our marketing is purpose-led, clear, and has unique characteristics to stand out above the noise. Executing on this boils down to a creating cohesive sense of your brand’s identity.

To get started, join Amazon’s Sabena Gupta as she shares best practices for bringing your mission to life in your creative that will speak for itself and translate into a strong presence in cross-channel campaigns.

Supercharging Social Engagement with Extended Creative Partnerships

The influencer marketing industry is predicted to be worth $10 billion by the end of this year. The role of influencers in helping brands connect with their audiences in highly relevant ways continues to evolve and be a dominant force for marketers in achieving scalable results. But, the differentiating factor is finding targeted partnerships as opposed to working with influencers based on the number of followers they have.

In this session, EP and Creative Director for Comedy Central Digital Studios, Mitch Lewis, will lead a panel covering the best practices for crafting original, organic content that drives authentic brand awareness.

There’s still time to join us at the Broad Stage this June (17-18). Browse the initial agenda and secure your pass online today for a discount off the walkup price.

Join 100,000+ fellow marketers who advance their skills and knowledge by subscribing to our weekly newsletter.

WATCH THE SMWLA 2019 RECAP

The post 3 Ways to Bring Humanity Back to Marketing at #SMWLA appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2020/02/3-ways-to-bring-humanity-back-to-marketing-at-smwla/

Announcing Our Initial #SMWLA 2020 Agenda!

We’re excited to share with you our initial agenda for our 11th annual edition of Social Media Week Los Angeles taking place this June 17-18!

Below you’ll find a teaser as to what we’ve organized around our 2020 theme HUMAN.X, including featured sessions hosted by PepsiCo, Comedy Central, Amazon, Fox Entertainment, HBO, Postmates, Nestlé, and many more.

We’ll be confirming additional sessions in the coming weeks, so stay tuned, but to help kick-start your planning now, here are a few highlights:

Using Influencers to Drive Brand Purpose

Leveraging Influencer Marketing to Build Brand Culture

Brands are set to spend a staggering $15 billion on influencer marketing by 2022. In this session, explore how Influencers can be used as a tool to create more engaging content and humanize your brand with PostmatesBen Trinh.

Start with Why: The Secret Unlock to Digital Innovation

Marketers are constantly inundated with choices around tapping into emerging technologies and using influencers for the sake of innovation. Understand the “why” behind using these trends and the importance of not falling victim to chasing the next shiny object with Nestle’s Head of Digital Innovation Orchid Bertelsen.

Under the Influencer with Comedy Central: Supercharging Social Engagement with Extended Creative Partnerships

In just a year, Comedy Central’s ‘Under the Influencer’ program has amassed 4.7 million total views and 29 million YouTube watch minutes. Hear from EP and Creative Director for Comedy Central Digital Studios, Mitch Lewis along with a panel of several comedians, actresses, and writers as they discuss the power of original content in rising above the noise.

Why Influencers Are Key to Bringing the Human Voice Back to Marketing?

It is easy to fall into the trap of chasing vanity metrics, but as an industry, it’s becoming more apparent that challenging the norm will be key to success. Tulani Elisa, VP of Social Media at FOX Entertainment, Jim Lin, Partner, SVP Digital Strategy and Creative Director at Ketchum and Lisa Perez, Head of Social Media and Influencer Marketing at Savage X Fenty will equip you with the insights you’ll need to develop human-first campaigns.

Embracing the Untapped Power of Social Listening

HBO Max: Bringing Viewers Closer to the Entertainment They Love

Subscribers are constantly changing how they choose their TV bundles leaving marketers wondering which techniques should be emulated for keeping them loyal? Peter Sherman, Vice President of HBO Max Programming at WarnerMedia and Linda Ong, Chief Culture Officer at Civic Entertainment Group will discuss this theme exploring how consumer behavior trends are changing and presenting major advertisement implications in the entertainment field.

The (Untapped) Power of Social Media

COMMUNITYx Founder & CEO, Chloë Cheyenne, MSNBC Host of AM Joy, Joy-Ann Reid, and COMMUNITYx Board of Activists Co-Chair, Brea Baker, will join Black Enterprise’s Selena Hill for a conversation on ways social media is a tool for fueling community engagement and their projections for how these efforts will continue in the years ahead.

From Streaming Wars to Content Ideation: How Social Listening Empowers the Entertainment Industry

How is social media impacting the use of platforms and the influence of analytics within today’s entertainment industry? Learn how to measure performance on a global scale, ways to make use of your powerful audience insights, and more alongside David Sager, Senior Manager Social Analytics at Fox Corporation and Talkwalker’s Nate Bonsignore.

Shifting the Focus From Attention to Connection

Today marketers have extensive access to data, but are they losing sight of the human behind the impression? Open Influence CEO, Eric Dahan, will address this pointing to success stories of brands leveraging social insights to improve their storytelling and forge deeper relationships.

Building a Sustainable Brand

Transcending the Human Digital Experience: A Brand and Agency Introspective

From content to paid media advertising to influencer outreach, where should marketers turn to find the right balance to ensure their efforts are sustainable? Kristin Patrick, CMO at PepsiCo and Norel Mancuso, CEO at Social House Inc. will address this question through the agency and brand lenses.

Making Mission Your Message

Having a strong mission is integral in ensuring sustainability across your marketing efforts. Sabena Gupta, Brand Marketing Lead for Alexa at Amazon, will use her cross-channel campaign expertise to share how you can shape your creative strategies that guarantee long-term growth.

Instagram Shopping: The Digital Window Display

How can community and creativity be integrated for a deeper understanding of your audience? Creative Strategist at Instagram and Global Creative Lead for Instagram Shopping, Rishi Magia, offers insights inspired from leading e-comm and retailers.

#IRL: Communities to Create Meaningful Connection

Notions of privacy and personal experiences in the digital space are facing fundamental shifts. What does this mean for marketers and how they shape their strategies around content and community-building especially when it comes to younger demographics? Havas Media’s Jess Richards will offer her perspective.

Browse the current agenda and secure your pass today to take advantage of the 30% discount before it expires.

WATCH THE SMWLA 2019 RECAP

The post Announcing Our Initial #SMWLA 2020 Agenda! appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2020/02/announcing-our-initial-smwla-2020-agenda/

Introducing the First Wave of Speakers for #SMWLA 2020

We are excited to announce the first round of leaders who will bring our 2020 theme HUMAN.X to life at Social Media Week Los Angeles this June (17-18).

Featuring insights from professionals at WarnerMedia, Comedy Central, PepsiCo, Postmates, R/GA, Nestlé and many more, consider this your first look at the curated lineup for this year’s event dedicated to unlocking the power of human-first, experience-led marketing.

BRAND & PLATFORM LEADERS

Kristin Patrick

Kristin Patrick

CMO, PepsiCo

Kristin is a reputable business builder leveraging 20+ years working at the intersection of content and commerce. She is an industry-known trendsetter who is able to establish relevance across major cultural areas ranging from sports, fashion, technology and music by keeping her finger on the pulse of shifting cultural trends.

 

Orchid Bertelsen

Orchid Bertelsen

Head of Digital Innovation, Nestlé

Leading digital innovation across more than 70 brands in the Nestlé USA portfolio, Orchid is a seasoned professional when it comes to helping brands identify opportunities to connect the dots between business challenges and technology-driven solutions. To avoid shiny object syndrome, her leadership emphasizes the value-add to the consumer experience.

 

Ben Trinh

Ben Trinh

Head of Entertainment & Brand Marketing, Postmates

As head of entertainment and marketing strategy at Postmates, Ben is a marketing maven with a passion for thumb-stopping content that resonates. He has previously worked for Yelp and Lyft, and brings his entrepreneurial mindset to his own branding company, Bredfor.com, and celebrity spotlight ‘First and Featured’ podcast.

 

Kritarth Chhabra

Kritarth Chhabra

Co-Founder, Lemonade

Identifying unique opportunities to help creators grow their community and reach is central to Kritarth’s role in running Lemonade. With a background spanning brand strategy, product, and tech, including playing a role on the Uber India team, Kritarth embraces the challenge of using a platform to blur the divide between offline and online relationships.

 

Jessica Wong

Jessica Wong

Director of Strategic Partnerships, TikTok

A knowledge-hungry marketer, Jessica leads strategic partnerships, sponsorships and integrated marketing at TikTok. She is driven by the excitement of turning multi-channel campaigns into positive business results that continue to build the platform’s audience.

 

Wen Miao

Wen Miao

CEO, LAVA

Wen is an industry known leader in real-time customer and experience and engagement whose work has received Stevie Awards and earned him a spot on the Premier 100 IT Leaders list by IDG Computer World. As CEO of LAVA, he unlocks real-time data to create meaningful moments that matter in the live entertainment space.

 

ENTERTAINMENT MARKETING EXPERTS, COMEDIANS AND CREATORS

Peter Sherman

Peter Sherman

SVP, HBO Max Program Marketing, WarnerMedia

Previously running marketing for TBS and TNT, Peter brings more than 15 years of work in brand building and digital marketing to the exclusive lineup of HBO Max programming. Using his deep knowledge into entertainment, tech, and CPG trends, he leads the effort of driving authentic engagement and leads for the streaming service.

 

Brandon Rogers

Brandon Rogers

Actor, Comedian, YouTube Personality

Across his multiple hats including YouTuber, actor, comedian, and director, Brandon has cemented his personality and built a fan base of more than 5 million loyal subscribers. Throughout his career he’s received recognition at the Streamy awards, successfully launched his own series Magic Funhouse, and collaborated with Comedy Central in its Under the Influencer program.

 

Simmi Singh

Simmi Singh

Actress/Comedian

Boasting a fan base of more than 1 million fans, Simmi is a well-known YouTube vlogger, comedian, and martial artist set to star in the forthcoming YouTube comedy Overthinking with Kat and June. Her videos emphasize positive, comedic messages to inspire her audience that stem from her personal experiences.

 

Anthony Padilla

Anthony Padilla

Actor/Comedy Writer

As an actor and comedy writer, Anthony is known for taking internet culture and translating it into satirical content across a variety of social platforms. Outside of his acting, he co-founded the media company Smosh, which attracted 22 million subscribers on YouTube and launched two feature films and over 10 short-scripted shows.

 

Lesley Robin

Lesley Robin

VP, Social Content and Strategy, Comedy Central

In her role as VP of Social Content and Strategy, Lesley utilizes a deep understanding of platform-specific best practices, problem-solving, creative thinking, and relationship building to build a unified Comedy Central audience. Standout campaigns she’s lead include The Roast of Jusin Bieber and the launch of The Daily Show with Trevor Noah and Clusterfest.

 

Matt Lawler

Matt Lawler

Director of Digital Media, Global Partnerships, AEG

As Director of Digital Media for the Global Partnerships division of AEG, Matt is a marketing visionary leading digital media initiatives and social campaigns. He is driven by the obstacle of using forward-thinking to balance monetization efforts and deliver value for AEG’s partners.

 

Richard Battersby

Richard Battersby

Vice President, Business Intelligence & Digital Analytics, AEG

Richard is a tech-driven marketer who has worked at the intersection of venues, sports and leisure and music for more than 15 years. He is motivated by the opportunities e-commerce solutions and emerging technologies present for enhancing the consumer experience and business success.

 

Mitch Lewis

Mitch Lewis

Executive Producer & Creative Director, Comedy Central

Comedy Central is home to hit shows like The Daily Show with Trevor Noah, Inside Amy Schumer, South Park, and Broad City. Serving as Executive Producer & Creative Director, Mitch leads the storytelling efforts in bringing sketch comedy to the digital world.

 

AGENCY EXECUTIVES

Norel Mancuso

Norel Mancuso

President & CEO, Social House

Norel is a digital marketing and media expert specializing in social content and strategic innovation. She brings more than 15 years of background in the fashion and beauty segments to Social House to deliver content to over 70 countries across the globe and offer industry insights as a speaker and educator for Fortune 500 companies.

 

Stephen Larkin

Stephen Larkin

Executive Director, Growth, R/GA

Stephen is a growth and reputation lead with an agency background leading projects with Mattel, Dollar Shave Club, and Pacific Life amongst many other high-profile brands. More recently, R/GA partnered with the Ad Council in the ‘Love Has No Labels’ campaign, recognized by Forbes as one of the most memorable ads from the past decade.

 

Linda Ong

Linda Ong

Chief Culture Officer, Marketing, Civic Entertainment Group

As Chief Culture Officer at CEG, Linda leverages more than 20 years of experience as an observer of the changing cultural landscape to help marketers, creators, industry researchers stay ahead of the curve. A sought-after industry voice, she has been featured in numerous books including Joel Beckerman’s ​The Sonic Boom: How Sound Transforms the Way We Think, Feel, and Buy​; Scott Stowell’s ​Design for People​; and Chiqui Cartagena’s ​Latino Boom II.​

 

Learn more about The Attention Revolution, Privacy Matters, and Empathy Economics, as part of our 2020 global theme: HUMAN.X and help us establish a human-first, experience-driven approach to digital marketing. Read the official announcement here and secure your early-bird discount today to save 40% on your full-conference pass to #SMWLA (June 17-18, 2020).

The post Introducing the First Wave of Speakers for #SMWLA 2020 appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2020/01/introducing-the-first-wave-of-speakers-for-smwla-2020/

Registration for #SMWLA 2020 is Now Open!

We’re excited to announce that passes are now on sale for the 11th edition of Social Media Week Los Angeles (#SMWLA), and if you secure your pass before Friday, January 24th, you will be able to take advantage of our biggest discount of 40% off!

We’re also thrilled to be back at the beautiful Broad Stage in Santa Monica (June 17-18), which marks our fourth year at this terrific venue. Also, in case you haven’t kept up with recent announcements, this year’s program will be center around our annual theme HUMAN.X.

HUMAN.X will explore why businesses will need to take a human-first and experience-driven approach to digital marketing in 2020 and beyond. Through the lens of three subthemes — Attention Revolution, Empathy Economics, and Privacy Matters — we will examine our moral obligation to respect consumers’ time and attention, foster meaningful connection through empathy and shared experiences, and create safe and trustworthy environments for productive interaction online.

SMW Global Theme: HUMAN.X

Read more about our 2020 Global Theme here.

All-New Tracks & Takeaways

During our the event, we will explore the theme and examine the state of digital marketing through nine curated content tracks, including:

  • Content & New Formats
  • Influencer Marketing & Creators
  • Audience & Data
  • Storytelling & Creativity
  • Chat & Messaging
  • Monetization & Commerce
  • Paid Media Models
  • Society & Culture
  • Emerging Trends & Future Tech
  • Brand Leadership

Each session will also provide actionable takeaways that map to your business objectives including increasing brand awareness, growing and engaging audiences, acquiring customers and driving sales, and tracking the competitive landscape.

We are excited to deliver above and beyond these themes and tracks in addition to the experiences for more intimate, tactical-style learning and networking.

Expanded SMW Academy program and Networking experiences

The SMW Academy program, launched in 2019, encompasses a series of tactical sessions on critical industry category topics including how to harness successful influencer relationships, identify opportunities and challenges for sharing stories in today’s diverse social media landscape, and amplify your brand story with short-form video.

In 2020, we are increasing the number of classes and opportunities to attend, while also offering an enhanced assortment of digital and in real life (IRL) networking opportunities to generate ideas through communication.

Stay tuned as we announce headline and featured speakers in the coming weeks, plus other exciting updates in regards to how we plan to take our Los Angeles event to new heights.

What are you waiting for? Secure your place today alongside 1.5k+ leaders, strategists, and practitioners at the premier event for leaders in digital marketing.

Join 100,000+ fellow marketers who advance their skills and knowledge by subscribing to our weekly newsletter.

WATCH THE SMWLA 2019 RECAP

The post Registration for #SMWLA 2020 is Now Open! appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2020/01/registration-for-smwla-2020-is-now-open/

PODCAST: From FYRE Fiasco to Force for Good: How Andy King is Embracing Virality

This week’s episode of Social Media Week’s Leads2Scale podcast features Andy King.

You might recognize the name as Andy became an internet celebrity thanks to his infamous appearance on Netflix’s FYRE Festival documentary, “Fyre: The Greatest Party That Never Happened.”

This was recorded live during a Social Media Week Los Angeles fireside chat titled, “Keeping the Fyre Alive: A Conversation with Andy King.”

During the conversation, Andy discussed:

  • His career before FYRE and how he first got involved with the organizers
  • How he embraced becoming an overnight viral celebrity
  • His impression of the Influencer space and how it is changing culture
  • And how he is using his new found celebrity for good

Listen to the full episode below:

Subscribe to Leads2Scale on Anchor, Apple Podcasts, Breaker, Google Podcasts, Pocket Casts, RadioPublic, Spotify, Castbox, Overcast, or Stitcher.

If you have suggestions for who we should interview or what topics you would like us to cover, please reach out to us at leads2scale@socialmediaweek.org.

Join 100,000+ fellow marketers who advance their skills and knowledge by subscribing to our weekly newsletter.

WATCH THE SMWLDN 2019 PROMO

The post PODCAST: From FYRE Fiasco to Force for Good: How Andy King is Embracing Virality appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/07/podcast-from-fyre-fiasco-to-force-for-good-how-andy-king-is-embracing-virality/

How Can Brands Use Experiences to Fuel Identity, Memories and Connections? Make Them Part of the Story, says Viacom

In the digital era, social media had made each and every person a storyteller, with the ability to share their lives with the push of a button. This poses the unique opportunity for brands to become a milestone in the life story of their audience.

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During #SMWLA, Maya Peterson, Director, Culture and Creative Insights at Viacom Velocity leads a conversation with Boye Fajinmi, Co-Founder and President of The Future Party and Gabrielle Richmond, Director of Programming and Partnerships at Shopify, discussed this topic at length, exploring how much social media has fundamentally changed the nature of experiences by fueling our identity projection, rewiring our connections, and augmenting our memories.

If you can’t gram it, should you stan it?

“Who has gone to an experience so they could take a picture of it and post it on social media? Pics or it didn’t happen?” Peterson quips, before underlining that as marketers, when you understand how much your audience’s experience experiences because of social media, you have an opportunity to connect with them more meaningfully.

iPhone’s appear to have enhanced the majority of experiences as opposed to detract from them, although keen festival and gig-goers may argue otherwise.

The intent behind documentation can be whittled down to the desire to express oneself in order to reflect your values or what you think you should be doing. This applies to both brands and people.

At events, only 19 percent say they get distracted by the need to find a good shot, however, almost half say dedicated social media areas at events relieve anxiety, which suggests people are inflicting a great amount of pressure on themselves to remain valid.

The experience should be part of the story

When it comes to experience, Fajinimi believes that experience should be part of the story and Richmond agrees, highlighting the five senses and that, if a person is able to interact – touch, taste and hear – as part of the experience, then the desire to share it online will be more organic and purposeful. Authentic too, which is a word thrown around a lot. What audiences see has to make sense to the brand.

Bridging the divide between online & social

Peterson asks whether there are ways other ways brands can bridge the divide between online and social, so it’s not just about finding a picture and Richmond believes this is tricky.

Fajinmi says, “right now we’re in this day and age where we have all these ice cream museums and it’s becoming an overload for people. A big trend is a digital detox. When you’re at the event, you’re actually not on your phone. Focus on experience and share it afterwards.” He also mentions the removal of the like button and how it could possibly give brands anxiety about measuring metrics.

Striking a strong partnership

When 52 percent of young people say that the most amazing brand experience changes their perspective, it can be easy for brands solely focus on creating THAT viral moment as opposed to a representation of themselves online. This can lead to audiences feeling like there’s a brick wall between them and the brand – a disconnect.

They conclude that a successful experience looks to educate people. There has to be a takeaway that has aided, developed or changed the receptor.

“Strike a smart partnership,” Fajinmi nods.

Join 100,000+ fellow marketers who advance their skills and knowledge by subscribing to our weekly newsletter.

WATCH THE SMWLDN 2019 PROMO

The post How Can Brands Use Experiences to Fuel Identity, Memories and Connections? Make Them Part of the Story, says Viacom appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/06/how-can-brands-use-experiences-to-fuel-identity-memories-and-connections-make-them-part-of-the-story-says-viacom/

Striking The Balance Between Human Expertise and AI: Insights from Linkfluence

According to the Havard Business Review, in the next 10 years, 75 percent of brands that are on the Fortune 500 won’t be there because as a result of digital transformation.

If brands don’t adapt and listen, then they risk losing relevance. Machines can help them do this but it is with context accessible via human experience that aid them to take effective action. Cultural trends, lifestyle factor, and qualitative research cannot be done by machines alone, currently.

Join SMW Insider to watch this #SMWLA session

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“Limiting social media data to marketing observations is like buying a Ferrari to drop your kids off at school. You’re not using the full potential of the tool,” Benjamin Duvall, the Chief Evangelist at Linkfluence explained during #SMWLA in a session exploring social listening and the importance of combining AI with human expertise.

Hacking Tracking

First, he outlined tracking as a business and brand priority and the number of ways to do this.
As a result of focusing on vanity metrics, social media listening platforms have evolved through consolidation.

You need to consider four things when tracking: awareness, desirability, proximity, and relevance. What is the scale of resonation of your brand and what is the gap between the brand desired equity and the equity actually spread by social media?

He then discussed what he referred to as a social intelligence maturity model. “You need to understand where your company is on so you don’t miss anything,” he explains. “So you aren’t thinking you’re killing it when you’re not.”

The Social Intelligence Maturity Model

The first step is alerting. Where little to no social media listening may be happening and there might even be some skepticism about the value of what’s being said on the social web. A few people rely on basic tools.

The next is monitoring. This discovery period can be quite eye-opening for teams when they start to explore what’s being said about their brand.

Third comes the listening – this is the ‘aha’ moment, where you then ask yourself what you should do with the data you obtain.

After listening comes strategic listening, where what you were doing before becomes truly integrated with your business process. Cross-functional teams are listening, deciding and reporting in real time to informer marketing strategy.

Social intelligence is the fifth and final step – it’s transformative. Data helps drive decision-making and influences budget and investment. This stage is still somewhat aspirational given that many of the tools are soiled.

Contextualize to avoid surprise

Overall, Duvall concluded that most importantly, “you need to ensure that when you get social listening data that it’s relevant to the context. Outcomes need to have a strategic change outlook and not just exist as community management.”

Join 100,000+ fellow marketers who advance their skills and knowledge by subscribing to our weekly newsletter.

WATCH OUR 2019 PROMO

The post Striking The Balance Between Human Expertise and AI: Insights from Linkfluence appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/06/striking-the-balance-between-human-expertise-and-ai-insights-from-linkfluence/

Striking The Balance Between Human Expertise and AI: Insights from Linkfluence

According to the Havard Business Review, in the next 10 years, 75 percent of brands that are on the Fortune 500 won’t be there because as a result of digital transformation.

If brands don’t adapt and listen, then they risk losing relevance. Machines can help them do this but it is with context accessible via human experience that aid them to take effective action. Cultural trends, lifestyle factor, and qualitative research cannot be done by machines alone, currently.

Join SMW Insider to watch this #SMWLA session

Subscribe

“Limiting social media data to marketing observations is like buying a Ferrari to drop your kids off at school. You’re not using the full potential of the tool,” Benjamin Duvall, the Chief Evangelist at Linkfluence explained during #SMWLA in a session exploring social listening and the importance of combining AI with human expertise.

Hacking Tracking

First, he outlined tracking as a business and brand priority and the number of ways to do this.
As a result of focusing on vanity metrics, social media listening platforms have evolved through consolidation.

You need to consider four things when tracking: awareness, desirability, proximity, and relevance. What is the scale of resonation of your brand and what is the gap between the brand desired equity and the equity actually spread by social media?

He then discussed what he referred to as a social intelligence maturity model. “You need to understand where your company is on so you don’t miss anything,” he explains. “So you aren’t thinking you’re killing it when you’re not.”

The Social Intelligence Maturity Model

The first step is alerting. Where little to no social media listening may be happening and there might even be some skepticism about the value of what’s being said on the social web. A few people rely on basic tools.

The next is monitoring. This discovery period can be quite eye-opening for teams when they start to explore what’s being said about their brand.

Third comes the listening – this is the ‘aha’ moment, where you then ask yourself what you should do with the data you obtain.

After listening comes strategic listening, where what you were doing before becomes truly integrated with your business process. Cross-functional teams are listening, deciding and reporting in real time to informer marketing strategy.

Social intelligence is the fifth and final step – it’s transformative. Data helps drive decision-making and influences budget and investment. This stage is still somewhat aspirational given that many of the tools are soiled.

Contextualize to avoid surprise

Overall, Duvall concluded that most importantly, “you need to ensure that when you get social listening data that it’s relevant to the context. Outcomes need to have a strategic change outlook and not just exist as community management.”

Join 100,000+ fellow marketers who advance their skills and knowledge by subscribing to our weekly newsletter.

WATCH OUR 2019 PROMO

The post Striking The Balance Between Human Expertise and AI: Insights from Linkfluence appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/06/striking-the-balance-between-human-expertise-and-ai-insights-from-linkfluence/

Striking The Balance Between Human Expertise and AI: Insights from Linkfluence

According to the Havard Business Review, in the next 10 years, 75 percent of brands that are on the Fortune 500 won’t be there because as a result of digital transformation.

If brands don’t adapt and listen, then they risk losing relevance. Machines can help them do this but it is with context accessible via human experience that aid them to take effective action. Cultural trends, lifestyle factor, and qualitative research cannot be done by machines alone, currently.

Join SMW Insider to watch this #SMWLA session

Subscribe

“Limiting social media data to marketing observations is like buying a Ferrari to drop your kids off at school. You’re not using the full potential of the tool,” Benjamin Duvall, the Chief Evangelist at Linkfluence explained during #SMWLA in a session exploring social listening and the importance of combining AI with human expertise.

Hacking Tracking

First, he outlined tracking as a business and brand priority and the number of ways to do this.
As a result of focusing on vanity metrics, social media listening platforms have evolved through consolidation.

You need to consider four things when tracking: awareness, desirability, proximity, and relevance. What is the scale of resonation of your brand and what is the gap between the brand desired equity and the equity actually spread by social media?

He then discussed what he referred to as a social intelligence maturity model. “You need to understand where your company is on so you don’t miss anything,” he explains. “So you aren’t thinking you’re killing it when you’re not.”

The Social Intelligence Maturity Model

The first step is alerting. Where little to no social media listening may be happening and there might even be some skepticism about the value of what’s being said on the social web. A few people rely on basic tools.

The next is monitoring. This discovery period can be quite eye-opening for teams when they start to explore what’s being said about their brand.

Third comes the listening – this is the ‘aha’ moment, where you then ask yourself what you should do with the data you obtain.

After listening comes strategic listening, where what you were doing before becomes truly integrated with your business process. Cross-functional teams are listening, deciding and reporting in real time to informer marketing strategy.

Social intelligence is the fifth and final step – it’s transformative. Data helps drive decision-making and influences budget and investment. This stage is still somewhat aspirational given that many of the tools are soiled.

Contextualize to avoid surprise

Overall, Duvall concluded that most importantly, “you need to ensure that when you get social listening data that it’s relevant to the context. Outcomes need to have a strategic change outlook and not just exist as community management.”

Join 100,000+ fellow marketers who advance their skills and knowledge by subscribing to our weekly newsletter.

WATCH OUR 2019 PROMO

The post Striking The Balance Between Human Expertise and AI: Insights from Linkfluence appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/06/striking-the-balance-between-human-expertise-and-ai-insights-from-linkfluence/

Striking The Balance Between Human Expertise and AI: Insights from Linkfluence

According to the Havard Business Review, in the next 10 years, 75 percent of brands that are on the Fortune 500 won’t be there because as a result of digital transformation.

If brands don’t adapt and listen, then they risk losing relevance. Machines can help them do this but it is with context accessible via human experience that aid them to take effective action. Cultural trends, lifestyle factor, and qualitative research cannot be done by machines alone, currently.

Join SMW Insider to watch this #SMWLA session

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“Limiting social media data to marketing observations is like buying a Ferrari to drop your kids off at school. You’re not using the full potential of the tool,” Benjamin Duvall, the Chief Evangelist at Linkfluence explained during #SMWLA in a session exploring social listening and the importance of combining AI with human expertise.

Hacking Tracking

First, he outlined tracking as a business and brand priority and the number of ways to do this.
As a result of focusing on vanity metrics, social media listening platforms have evolved through consolidation.

You need to consider four things when tracking: awareness, desirability, proximity, and relevance. What is the scale of resonation of your brand and what is the gap between the brand desired equity and the equity actually spread by social media?

He then discussed what he referred to as a social intelligence maturity model. “You need to understand where your company is on so you don’t miss anything,” he explains. “So you aren’t thinking you’re killing it when you’re not.”

The Social Intelligence Maturity Model

The first step is alerting. Where little to no social media listening may be happening and there might even be some skepticism about the value of what’s being said on the social web. A few people rely on basic tools.

The next is monitoring. This discovery period can be quite eye-opening for teams when they start to explore what’s being said about their brand.

Third comes the listening – this is the ‘aha’ moment, where you then ask yourself what you should do with the data you obtain.

After listening comes strategic listening, where what you were doing before becomes truly integrated with your business process. Cross-functional teams are listening, deciding and reporting in real time to informer marketing strategy.

Social intelligence is the fifth and final step – it’s transformative. Data helps drive decision-making and influences budget and investment. This stage is still somewhat aspirational given that many of the tools are soiled.

Contextualize to avoid surprise

Overall, Duvall concluded that most importantly, “you need to ensure that when you get social listening data that it’s relevant to the context. Outcomes need to have a strategic change outlook and not just exist as community management.”

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The post Striking The Balance Between Human Expertise and AI: Insights from Linkfluence appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/06/striking-the-balance-between-human-expertise-and-ai-insights-from-linkfluence/

Social Listening in Sports Marketing Can Create the Loudest Cheers, per Talkwalker

Social listening can turn “brand noise” into brand insight, competitive intelligence, and sponsorship engagement. It is no different in the sports marketing world.

During #SMWLA, Marla Grossberg, Consumer Insights & Strategy Director for the Milwaukee Brewers, and Nate Bonsignore, the West Coast Regional Manager at Talkwalker, sat down to discuss how social listening and other tools can enable sports marketers to hit a home-run this year.

The strategic role of social listening

Because social listening has become more vital to a company’s social strategy, many companies have tried to incorporate this tool. Still, Grossberg talked about her past within companies which were not doing so successfully, despite establishing go-to social media and measurement employees.

Join SMW Insider to watch this #SMWLA session

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“The problem was they weren’t embedded in the teams. They didn’t understand what the brand’s issues or problems were and folks on the teams didn’t understand the tool or social media listening, so they didn’t know how to use [it]. It was this great thing, but it was under-utilized,” Grossberg said.

With an understanding that social media can sometimes be “chaotic or misplaced,” Grossberg elaborated on how brand teams are using social listening to overcome that.

Incorporating social within marketing teams

For starters, with the Brewers’ brand, social media is incorporated within the marketing department.

The Brewers brand also uses Talkwalker’s ability to monitor what is happening in their social channels to gain insight on both what users think about campaigns, products, events and the like, and to gauge the brand’s awareness of their consumers, too.

“We found that Talkwalker served two different needs for us that we didn’t even realize,” Grossberg said, “One was about innovation and inspiration for giveaways. Another one was about sponsorships…Talkwaker was a phenomenal way to add value to those partnerships.”

The opportunity

Considering that the sports industry is estimated to hit $80.3 billion dollars by 2020, as Bonsignore mentioned, there is literal value in finding ways to stand out from a social listening perspective.

Making product, content, and event decisions that will appeal to consumers is the ultimate, great result.

Join 100,000+ fellow marketers who advance their skills and knowledge by subscribing to our weekly newsletter.

WATCH OUR 2019 PROMO

The post Social Listening in Sports Marketing Can Create the Loudest Cheers, per Talkwalker appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/06/social-listening-in-sports-marketing-can-create-the-loudest-cheers-per-talkwalker/

Social Listening in Sports Marketing Can Create the Loudest Cheers, per Talkwalker

Social listening can turn “brand noise” into brand insight, competitive intelligence, and sponsorship engagement. It is no different in the sports marketing world.

During #SMWLA, Marla Grossberg, Consumer Insights & Strategy Director for the Milwaukee Brewers, and Nate Bonsignore, the West Coast Regional Manager at Talkwalker, sat down to discuss how social listening and other tools can enable sports marketers to hit a home-run this year.

The strategic role of social listening

Because social listening has become more vital to a company’s social strategy, many companies have tried to incorporate this tool. Still, Grossberg talked about her past within companies which were not doing so successfully, despite establishing go-to social media and measurement employees.

Join SMW Insider to watch this #SMWLA session

Subscribe

“The problem was they weren’t embedded in the teams. They didn’t understand what the brand’s issues or problems were and folks on the teams didn’t understand the tool or social media listening, so they didn’t know how to use [it]. It was this great thing, but it was under-utilized,” Grossberg said.

With an understanding that social media can sometimes be “chaotic or misplaced,” Grossberg elaborated on how brand teams are using social listening to overcome that.

Incorporating social within marketing teams

For starters, with the Brewers’ brand, social media is incorporated within the marketing department.

The Brewers brand also uses Talkwalker’s ability to monitor what is happening in their social channels to gain insight on both what users think about campaigns, products, events and the like, and to gauge the brand’s awareness of their consumers, too.

“We found that Talkwalker served two different needs for us that we didn’t even realize,” Grossberg said, “One was about innovation and inspiration for giveaways. Another one was about sponsorships…Talkwaker was a phenomenal way to add value to those partnerships.”

The opportunity

Considering that the sports industry is estimated to hit $80.3 billion dollars by 2020, as Bonsignore mentioned, there is literal value in finding ways to stand out from a social listening perspective.

Making product, content, and event decisions that will appeal to consumers is the ultimate, great result.

Join 100,000+ fellow marketers who advance their skills and knowledge by subscribing to our weekly newsletter.

WATCH OUR 2019 PROMO

The post Social Listening in Sports Marketing Can Create the Loudest Cheers, per Talkwalker appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/06/social-listening-in-sports-marketing-can-create-the-loudest-cheers-per-talkwalker/

Social Listening in Sports Marketing Can Create the Loudest Cheers, per Talkwalker

Social listening can turn “brand noise” into brand insight, competitive intelligence, and sponsorship engagement. It is no different in the sports marketing world.

During #SMWLA, Marla Grossberg, Consumer Insights & Strategy Director for the Milwaukee Brewers, and Nate Bonsignore, the West Coast Regional Manager at Talkwalker, sat down to discuss how social listening and other tools can enable sports marketers to hit a home-run this year.

The strategic role of social listening

Because social listening has become more vital to a company’s social strategy, many companies have tried to incorporate this tool. Still, Grossberg talked about her past within companies which were not doing so successfully, despite establishing go-to social media and measurement employees.

Join SMW Insider to watch this #SMWLA session

Subscribe

“The problem was they weren’t embedded in the teams. They didn’t understand what the brand’s issues or problems were and folks on the teams didn’t understand the tool or social media listening, so they didn’t know how to use [it]. It was this great thing, but it was under-utilized,” Grossberg said.

With an understanding that social media can sometimes be “chaotic or misplaced,” Grossberg elaborated on how brand teams are using social listening to overcome that.

Incorporating social within marketing teams

For starters, with the Brewers’ brand, social media is incorporated within the marketing department.

The Brewers brand also uses Talkwalker’s ability to monitor what is happening in their social channels to gain insight on both what users think about campaigns, products, events and the like, and to gauge the brand’s awareness of their consumers, too.

“We found that Talkwalker served two different needs for us that we didn’t even realize,” Grossberg said, “One was about innovation and inspiration for giveaways. Another one was about sponsorships…Talkwaker was a phenomenal way to add value to those partnerships.”

The opportunity

Considering that the sports industry is estimated to hit $80.3 billion dollars by 2020, as Bonsignore mentioned, there is literal value in finding ways to stand out from a social listening perspective.

Making product, content, and event decisions that will appeal to consumers is the ultimate, great result.

Join 100,000+ fellow marketers who advance their skills and knowledge by subscribing to our weekly newsletter.

WATCH OUR 2019 PROMO

The post Social Listening in Sports Marketing Can Create the Loudest Cheers, per Talkwalker appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/06/social-listening-in-sports-marketing-can-create-the-loudest-cheers-per-talkwalker/

Scaling UGC and Navigating the Shifting Agency Model: Tips from Social Native

The digital era has enabled anyone with a smartphone to generate high quality, creative content. While traditional agencies struggle to keep up, leading brands are capitalizing on the power of user-generated content, or UGC, by restructuring to attain high quality and cost-effective content as well as shifting their distribution strategies.

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During #SMWLA, David Shadpour, CEO & Co-Founder of Social Native, highlighted key points to allow a brand to tap into what creative users have to offer.

The Tools to Create Are at Our Fingertips

Shadapour explained that people can be viewed as “micro-agencies” who are creating content all of the time. Polling from the Social Media Week Los Angeles audience, those present agreed that they themselves have thousands of original pictures stored on their phones.

“The smartphone community are trying to preach that phones can now create unbelievable quality content,” he said, referring to the “Shot on iPhone” ads seen on billboards and bus stops.

He commented that the Apple brand is both reminding people of what their phones can do and using that accessibility to produce high quality and authentic content themselves.

UGC is Key to Affordably Creating Content at Scale

More good practice comes from Coca-Cola’s strategy on National Taco Day. According to Shadpour, the beverage company put out a call for taco content on several of their social media platforms on that day. Within two hours, he said, Coca-Cola had 44 unique assets which all met the brand guidelines.

While 44 may or may not sound like a lot, that is plenty of content to choose from in such a limited time. The company was able to pick the assets they loved and use them on different platforms almost immediately.

Shadpour explained, “Imagine having one unique piece of creative on Instagram whereas you have it different on Twitter, and so on.” And none of the various options were a cost to the company.

What Works Best When Partnering with Consumers

Given the large amount of people that have a smartphone (a figure of 2.5 billion according to Shadpour), how does a brand determine who can actually create high quality content?

“You onboard Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Snapchat, etc., and you start building profiles on individuals. Luckily, through our partnerships, we have a world of data on the audience, and we’ve learned how to predict who is more talented in creating content than others,” Shadpour said.

But that is only one of many phases. Phase two, which Shadpour said he finds the most interesting, consists of ratings. There are tools which allow for pieces of content to be scored and, with time, build up a reliability that companies can evaluate.

Additionally, there is room for further insight. “We’ve, over time, discovered that different people make great vertical video and different people make great still images, and so on, and so on,” he said.

Finally, Shadpour reminded brands that the best part about UGC is authenticity. “Don’t hire random people to create content for dogs, hire someone who is a dog lover. Don’t hire someone random to create content for kids, hire a mom or a dad. That’s what works,” he said.

Join 100,000+ fellow marketers who advance their skills and knowledge by subscribing to our weekly newsletter.

WATCH THE SMWLDN 2019 PROMO

The post Scaling UGC and Navigating the Shifting Agency Model: Tips from Social Native appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/06/scaling-ugc-and-navigating-the-shifting-agency-model-tips-from-social-native/

Scaling UGC and Navigating the Shifting Agency Model: Tips from Social Native

The digital era has enabled anyone with a smartphone to generate high quality, creative content. While traditional agencies struggle to keep up, leading brands are capitalizing on the power of user-generated content, or UGC, by restructuring to attain high quality and cost-effective content as well as shifting their distribution strategies.

Join SMW Insider to watch this #SMWLA session

Subscribe

During #SMWLA, David Shadpour, CEO & Co-Founder of Social Native, highlighted key points to allow a brand to tap into what creative users have to offer.

The Tools to Create Are at Our Fingertips

Shadapour explained that people can be viewed as “micro-agencies” who are creating content all of the time. Polling from the Social Media Week Los Angeles audience, those present agreed that they themselves have thousands of original pictures stored on their phones.

“The smartphone community are trying to preach that phones can now create unbelievable quality content,” he said, referring to the “Shot on iPhone” ads seen on billboards and bus stops.

He commented that the Apple brand is both reminding people of what their phones can do and using that accessibility to produce high quality and authentic content themselves.

UGC is Key to Affordably Creating Content at Scale

More good practice comes from Coca-Cola’s strategy on National Taco Day. According to Shadpour, the beverage company put out a call for taco content on several of their social media platforms on that day. Within two hours, he said, Coca-Cola had 44 unique assets which all met the brand guidelines.

While 44 may or may not sound like a lot, that is plenty of content to choose from in such a limited time. The company was able to pick the assets they loved and use them on different platforms almost immediately.

Shadpour explained, “Imagine having one unique piece of creative on Instagram whereas you have it different on Twitter, and so on.” And none of the various options were a cost to the company.

What Works Best When Partnering with Consumers

Given the large amount of people that have a smartphone (a figure of 2.5 billion according to Shadpour), how does a brand determine who can actually create high quality content?

“You onboard Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Snapchat, etc., and you start building profiles on individuals. Luckily, through our partnerships, we have a world of data on the audience, and we’ve learned how to predict who is more talented in creating content than others,” Shadpour said.

But that is only one of many phases. Phase two, which Shadpour said he finds the most interesting, consists of ratings. There are tools which allow for pieces of content to be scored and, with time, build up a reliability that companies can evaluate.

Additionally, there is room for further insight. “We’ve, over time, discovered that different people make great vertical video and different people make great still images, and so on, and so on,” he said.

Finally, Shadpour reminded brands that the best part about UGC is authenticity. “Don’t hire random people to create content for dogs, hire someone who is a dog lover. Don’t hire someone random to create content for kids, hire a mom or a dad. That’s what works,” he said.

Join 100,000+ fellow marketers who advance their skills and knowledge by subscribing to our weekly newsletter.

WATCH THE SMWLDN 2019 PROMO

The post Scaling UGC and Navigating the Shifting Agency Model: Tips from Social Native appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/06/scaling-ugc-and-navigating-the-shifting-agency-model-tips-from-social-native/

How to Bring Back and Leverage Fun on Social Media: Insights from Grey

Social media was largely considered fun when it first boomed in pop culture. So, what happened? How it can be best brought to life in a social media world?

During #SMWLA, representatives of Grey came together for a candid discussion on what fun means within a social media platform today.

Join SMW Insider to watch this #SMWLA session

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Bevan Mahaney, the West Coast Creative Director of Grey, reminded people that we originally got on social media “because of the organic joy happening there” and for a sense of connection.

Social media has deprioritized fun

But in recent times, social media has meant pressure, anticipation and much expectation.

“Fun has been de-prioritized,” Mahaney said. While people used to use social media to show fun hobbies or moments, it has shifted toward an emphasis on careers and entrepreneurialism

Holland Martini, Director of Data Strategy at Grey, agreed, “Everything’s a hustle.”

Creating a foundation for authentic fun

Mahaney and Martini went on to explain that authentic fun is more likely to spring from spontaneous, unplanned moments that can create connections and leave lasting impressions.

Although social media practices and engagement helps people memorialize their fun, via photo or status updates, recent data may suggest that fun is not something we have anymore.

Grey noted that 43 percent of people in the United States believe their relationships lack meaning, 69 percent are stressed over current politics and the country’s future, and that the U.S. falls in the 18th place when it comes to rankings of the happiest countries in the world.

To top it off, only five percent of people consider fun their top priority.

The Grey representatives posed the question: How can brands leverage fun?

Among those scary percentages, there is also a finding that says 50 percent of people are more likely to purchase from a brand if it can help them have fun. Seventy-six percent would also be willing to spend more on that brand.

There is still money in fun

In other words, it does not have to be all career-talk and entrepreneurialism; there is still money in fun.

Martini said that fun can be specifically tied to entrepreneurialism, as it helps boost one’s mood, productivity and connections. She suggested that if brands were aware that fun could help business in this way, they would probably be willing to invest money in inhibiting fun.

In fact, fun helps counteract the high statistics of stress and lack of meaning or happiness one could be experiencing within the shifted focus of social media.

Join 100,000+ fellow marketers who advance their skills and knowledge by subscribing to our weekly newsletter.

WATCH OUR 2019 PROMO

The post How to Bring Back and Leverage Fun on Social Media: Insights from Grey appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/06/how-to-bring-back-and-leverage-fun-on-social-media-insights-from-grey/

How to Bring Back and Leverage Fun on Social Media: Insights from Grey

Social media was largely considered fun when it first boomed in pop culture. So, what happened? How it can be best brought to life in a social media world?

During #SMWLA, representatives of Grey came together for a candid discussion on what fun means within a social media platform today.

Join SMW Insider to watch this #SMWLA session

Subscribe

Bevan Mahaney, the West Coast Creative Director of Grey, reminded people that we originally got on social media “because of the organic joy happening there” and for a sense of connection.

Social media has deprioritized fun

But in recent times, social media has meant pressure, anticipation and much expectation.

“Fun has been de-prioritized,” Mahaney said. While people used to use social media to show fun hobbies or moments, it has shifted toward an emphasis on careers and entrepreneurialism

Holland Martini, Director of Data Strategy at Grey, agreed, “Everything’s a hustle.”

Creating a foundation for authentic fun

Mahaney and Martini went on to explain that authentic fun is more likely to spring from spontaneous, unplanned moments that can create connections and leave lasting impressions.

Although social media practices and engagement helps people memorialize their fun, via photo or status updates, recent data may suggest that fun is not something we have anymore.

Grey noted that 43 percent of people in the United States believe their relationships lack meaning, 69 percent are stressed over current politics and the country’s future, and that the U.S. falls in the 18th place when it comes to rankings of the happiest countries in the world.

To top it off, only five percent of people consider fun their top priority.

The Grey representatives posed the question: How can brands leverage fun?

Among those scary percentages, there is also a finding that says 50 percent of people are more likely to purchase from a brand if it can help them have fun. Seventy-six percent would also be willing to spend more on that brand.

There is still money in fun

In other words, it does not have to be all career-talk and entrepreneurialism; there is still money in fun.

Martini said that fun can be specifically tied to entrepreneurialism, as it helps boost one’s mood, productivity and connections. She suggested that if brands were aware that fun could help business in this way, they would probably be willing to invest money in inhibiting fun.

In fact, fun helps counteract the high statistics of stress and lack of meaning or happiness one could be experiencing within the shifted focus of social media.

Join 100,000+ fellow marketers who advance their skills and knowledge by subscribing to our weekly newsletter.

WATCH OUR 2019 PROMO

The post How to Bring Back and Leverage Fun on Social Media: Insights from Grey appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/06/how-to-bring-back-and-leverage-fun-on-social-media-insights-from-grey/

Evolving Creativity & Storytelling at the Pace of Pop Culture: Insights from Ira Madison III

In our digital-first world powered by social media, change is fast and constant—and there is a continual pressure on marketers and their partners to keep up (or miss out on critical opportunities to grow and engage with target audiences).

Join SMW Insider to watch this #SMWLA session

Subscribe

During #SMWLA, Ira Madison III sat down with Grey West‘s Bevan Mahaney for a conversation around staying relevant by drafting off or creating for pop culture — and how to maintain your voice and message in the process.

The creative process & stay abreast of pop culture trends

On Keep It! Madison III and his two co-hosts cover a wide variety of topics spanning race, sexuality, and celebrity gossip and get the opportunity to interview and interact with funny and fascinating faces every week.

In discussing how he identifies people to host and what topics will be covered, he described “it’s basically what happened..we’re pretty topical…we find out what’s trending, what people are talking about and go through each story over the weekend and by Monday we decide what we’ll talk about the next day.”

More generally, as much as possible he tries to follow the practice of steering clear of topics he isn’t genuinely interested in. The one exception being ‘mega news,’ but even then if it’s big enough news there is a likelihood you’ll develop a curiosity to discuss what it is.

When asked for his secret in staying ahead of the latest pop culture trends, Madison III had a simple answer: “I’m glued to my phone…it’s hard to take media breaks, even when you’re on vacation…you want to be politically and culturally literate.”

Keeping a positive vibe

If you want to be a successful creative, Madison III recommends surrounding yourself with creative friends. He says that this is reflected in his conversations on Keep It!

“If you’re a creative person, specifically in LA and the industries we work in, it’s easy to get wrapped up in your work and the idea of trying to keep up with the Jones’ of the industry. It’s great when you have friends as creative as you and as interested in the same things you’re talking about.”

He went on to describe that a lot of the conversations that he engages in on a non-professional, everyday life basis serve as an inspiration and help formulate the opinions he’ll ultimately deliver on the podcast. When this happens, “it doesn’t feel like work – rather it’s preparation for the show,” he explained.

Beyond serving as fuel to continue delivering high-quality podcast episodes, Madison III also added this is important in avoiding your own “echo chamber.” In other words, pushing yourself to look outside of your own perspective before fully formulating your thoughts on a given story. As examples of who he particularly looks to, he mentioned Allison Davis, Wesley Morris, and Jenna Wortham.

“You read their works and you get them coming to you as opposed to seeking out the entire website,” he added.

None of this is to say there isn’t a level of healthy competition amongst Madison IIi and his friends, “if there wasn’t any at all, we probably wouldn’t be who we are,” he said. The differentiating factor is that they feed off one another and in turn, push and build each other up to be greater together as opposed to bringing one another down.

The role of bloggers/commentators/podcast hosts in pop culture

In the context of red carpets and fashion, Madison III expressed “there’s this idea that people bonk against criticism…there’s someone you don’t know judging you but you have to think of it as a push and pull and how criticism creates the culture and a necessary part of it.”

Taking this example further, he articulated that there are celebrities and reporters who are talking about whether they look good or not in this dress or outfit, but it’s also the fact that they’ve been provided the wardrobe for free and wore it because the designer wants people to see and critique it. ”If you’re participating in this you have to participate in the other part.”

“Criticism is very good in terms of television, and films and books and other culture because you constantly can’t have …a culture as I said earlier that’s an echo chamber and a lot of people now have built their own echo chambers where they don’t hear any criticism.”

The role of brands

When posed with the question as to whether or not brands have a role in cultural movements and conversation Madison III explained, “whether or not they’re doing an ad or tweeting, they have a voice. If a brand wants to advertise on Tucker Carlson for instance, that’s having a voice whether or not they know it.”

He added that if your brand wishes to be engaged with a community and is interested in supporting a cause at one point in the year, support it year round. Be proud about your brand’s beliefs and you’ll attract the right people.

“Instead of creating an activation around a tent pole because this is the moment we celebrate Pride for instance if that’s the community you want to target, support Pride year-round not just in June – that’s when you see what a brand truly represents,” Mahaney added.

In short, prove to your audience there’s authenticity behind your dedication to them and make them feel heard and seen outside of the confines of a given month, day, or week that may be devoted to them.

As a piece of parting advice for creators looking to kick off their own podcasts, he shared, “pretty much anyone can do a podcast.” The key requirements: the ability to record it, edit it, and have the tenacity to keep going until you develop a following.

Join 100,000+ fellow marketers who advance their skills and knowledge by subscribing to our weekly newsletter.

WATCH OUR 2019 PROMO

The post Evolving Creativity & Storytelling at the Pace of Pop Culture: Insights from Ira Madison III appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/06/evolving-creativity-storytelling-at-the-pace-of-pop-culture-insights-from-ira-madison-iii/

Evolving Creativity & Storytelling at the Pace of Pop Culture: Insights from Ira Madison III

In our digital-first world powered by social media, change is fast and constant—and there is a continual pressure on marketers and their partners to keep up (or miss out on critical opportunities to grow and engage with target audiences).

Join SMW Insider to watch this #SMWLA session

Subscribe

During #SMWLA, Ira Madison III sat down with Grey West‘s Bevan Mahaney for a conversation around staying relevant by drafting off or creating for pop culture — and how to maintain your voice and message in the process.

The creative process & stay abreast of pop culture trends

On Keep It! Madison III and his two co-hosts cover a wide variety of topics spanning race, sexuality, and celebrity gossip and get the opportunity to interview and interact with funny and fascinating faces every week.

In discussing how he identifies people to host and what topics will be covered, he described “it’s basically what happened..we’re pretty topical…we find out what’s trending, what people are talking about and go through each story over the weekend and by Monday we decide what we’ll talk about the next day.”

More generally, as much as possible he tries to follow the practice of steering clear of topics he isn’t genuinely interested in. The one exception being ‘mega news,’ but even then if it’s big enough news there is a likelihood you’ll develop a curiosity to discuss what it is.

When asked for his secret in staying ahead of the latest pop culture trends, Madison III had a simple answer: “I’m glued to my phone…it’s hard to take media breaks, even when you’re on vacation…you want to be politically and culturally literate.”

Keeping a positive vibe

If you want to be a successful creative, Madison III recommends surrounding yourself with creative friends. He says that this is reflected in his conversations on Keep It!

“If you’re a creative person, specifically in LA and the industries we work in, it’s easy to get wrapped up in your work and the idea of trying to keep up with the Jones’ of the industry. It’s great when you have friends as creative as you and as interested in the same things you’re talking about.”

He went on to describe that a lot of the conversations that he engages in on a non-professional, everyday life basis serve as an inspiration and help formulate the opinions he’ll ultimately deliver on the podcast. When this happens, “it doesn’t feel like work – rather it’s preparation for the show,” he explained.

Beyond serving as fuel to continue delivering high-quality podcast episodes, Madison III also added this is important in avoiding your own “echo chamber.” In other words, pushing yourself to look outside of your own perspective before fully formulating your thoughts on a given story. As examples of who he particularly looks to, he mentioned Allison Davis, Wesley Morris, and Jenna Wortham.

“You read their works and you get them coming to you as opposed to seeking out the entire website,” he added.

None of this is to say there isn’t a level of healthy competition amongst Madison IIi and his friends, “if there wasn’t any at all, we probably wouldn’t be who we are,” he said. The differentiating factor is that they feed off one another and in turn, push and build each other up to be greater together as opposed to bringing one another down.

The role of bloggers/commentators/podcast hosts in pop culture

In the context of red carpets and fashion, Madison III expressed “there’s this idea that people bonk against criticism…there’s someone you don’t know judging you but you have to think of it as a push and pull and how criticism creates the culture and a necessary part of it.”

Taking this example further, he articulated that there are celebrities and reporters who are talking about whether they look good or not in this dress or outfit, but it’s also the fact that they’ve been provided the wardrobe for free and wore it because the designer wants people to see and critique it. ”If you’re participating in this you have to participate in the other part.”

“Criticism is very good in terms of television, and films and books and other culture because you constantly can’t have …a culture as I said earlier that’s an echo chamber and a lot of people now have built their own echo chambers where they don’t hear any criticism.”

The role of brands

When posed with the question as to whether or not brands have a role in cultural movements and conversation Madison III explained, “whether or not they’re doing an ad or tweeting, they have a voice. If a brand wants to advertise on Tucker Carlson for instance, that’s having a voice whether or not they know it.”

He added that if your brand wishes to be engaged with a community and is interested in supporting a cause at one point in the year, support it year round. Be proud about your brand’s beliefs and you’ll attract the right people.

“Instead of creating an activation around a tent pole because this is the moment we celebrate Pride for instance if that’s the community you want to target, support Pride year-round not just in June – that’s when you see what a brand truly represents,” Mahaney added.

In short, prove to your audience there’s authenticity behind your dedication to them and make them feel heard and seen outside of the confines of a given month, day, or week that may be devoted to them.

As a piece of parting advice for creators looking to kick off their own podcasts, he shared, “pretty much anyone can do a podcast.” The key requirements: the ability to record it, edit it, and have the tenacity to keep going until you develop a following.

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The post Evolving Creativity & Storytelling at the Pace of Pop Culture: Insights from Ira Madison III appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/06/evolving-creativity-storytelling-at-the-pace-of-pop-culture-insights-from-ira-madison-iii/

Inside the Influencer-Marketer Partnership: Tips from Julius

Influencer marketing has become much sought after, but as the field grows, it is important to explore and understand the priorities within an influencer and marketer partnership.

Join SMW Insider to watch this #SMWLA session

Subscribe

During #SMWLA, Karin Swanson, Head of Strategic Partnerships at Julius, a company that specializes in influencer vetting, spoke with several influencers to break down what marketers should be asking themselves when working alongside them and in order to execute a better campaign.

What do influencers want from their marketing partners?

Swanson touched on this need with a slide that advised, “Be informed and know as much about the influencer as you would like them to know about your brand.”

There are often strict standards which require influencers to know the brand’s mission, aesthetic and team structure, to name a few things, prior to working with it. Yet the brand itself is does not meet those same standards when working with an influencer, according to Swanson.

It’s about authenticity and building trust.

To prove the point, Swanson shared statistics that showed that 66% of influencers polled said they are motivated by the opportunity to share a passion and expertise with a marketing partner. So it should not be simply the other way around.

What can solidify a partnership?

While influencers care about compensation for their work, experiences and creativity are sometimes valued over money.

Matthew Nadu, an actor, host and producer, relayed that when brands offer things (products, dinners, experiences) as part of the compensation, they stand out to him because he is gaining an access that is not typically available.

“It’s things that you wouldn’t normally get to do…You can authentically enjoy it,” Nadu said.

In addition, there can be value to the brand in providing these things to an influencer: Nadu talked about working with Australian brand Traveller’s Autobarn, whom was converting Ford vans into camper vans, and receiving access for two-weeks to drive around in one.

“We basically just took this thing, ran it 3,000 miles, all over the west coast, and we hit every national park that we love. That was awesome because they were like, ‘Here, we trust you guys. Just make whatever the content is that you want to make. Just make our van look cool.’”

For a company that was having trouble connecting to the American audience, that worked. And it also worked for the influencer, adding truth to Swanson’s stat. that 74%  of influencers polled were motivated by the ability to be more creative.

How can advertisers build better relationships with influencers?

It is important that influencers feel like they can still be themselves while working with a brand, Swanson has found.

Tyler Grove, who has the podcast and website We Traveled Where, advised brands to build organic relationships, as she experienced with COOLA Suncare, which she described as her favorite partnership to this day.

Because she feels there is an honesty in their relationship, she also feels free to test and tell them her true opinion about their new products.

In addition, she reminded brands to capitalize on people that are excited and loyal to the brand from the start.

“Don’t forget about those nano-influencers, or people that you might be seeing on social media, posting about your brand, that might have two or 3,000 followers because in three to five years from now, they might be the people with 100,000 followers,” she said.

Join 100,000+ fellow marketers who advance their skills and knowledge by subscribing to our weekly newsletter.

WATCH OUR 2019 PROMO

 

The post Inside the Influencer-Marketer Partnership: Tips from Julius appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/06/inside-the-influencer-marketer-partnership-tips-from-julius/

Inside the Influencer-Marketer Partnership: Tips from Julius

Influencer marketing has become much sought after, but as the field grows, it is important to explore and understand the priorities within an influencer and marketer partnership.

Join SMW Insider to watch this #SMWLA session

Subscribe

During #SMWLA, Karin Swanson, Head of Strategic Partnerships at Julius, a company that specializes in influencer vetting, spoke with several influencers to break down what marketers should be asking themselves when working alongside them and in order to execute a better campaign.

What do influencers want from their marketing partners?

Swanson touched on this need with a slide that advised, “Be informed and know as much about the influencer as you would like them to know about your brand.”

There are often strict standards which require influencers to know the brand’s mission, aesthetic and team structure, to name a few things, prior to working with it. Yet the brand itself is does not meet those same standards when working with an influencer, according to Swanson.

It’s about authenticity and building trust.

To prove the point, Swanson shared statistics that showed that 66% of influencers polled said they are motivated by the opportunity to share a passion and expertise with a marketing partner. So it should not be simply the other way around.

What can solidify a partnership?

While influencers care about compensation for their work, experiences and creativity are sometimes valued over money.

Matthew Nadu, an actor, host and producer, relayed that when brands offer things (products, dinners, experiences) as part of the compensation, they stand out to him because he is gaining an access that is not typically available.

“It’s things that you wouldn’t normally get to do…You can authentically enjoy it,” Nadu said.

In addition, there can be value to the brand in providing these things to an influencer: Nadu talked about working with Australian brand Traveller’s Autobarn, whom was converting Ford vans into camper vans, and receiving access for two-weeks to drive around in one.

“We basically just took this thing, ran it 3,000 miles, all over the west coast, and we hit every national park that we love. That was awesome because they were like, ‘Here, we trust you guys. Just make whatever the content is that you want to make. Just make our van look cool.’”

For a company that was having trouble connecting to the American audience, that worked. And it also worked for the influencer, adding truth to Swanson’s stat. that 74%  of influencers polled were motivated by the ability to be more creative.

How can advertisers build better relationships with influencers?

It is important that influencers feel like they can still be themselves while working with a brand, Swanson has found.

Tyler Grove, who has the podcast and website We Traveled Where, advised brands to build organic relationships, as she experienced with COOLA Suncare, which she described as her favorite partnership to this day.

Because she feels there is an honesty in their relationship, she also feels free to test and tell them her true opinion about their new products.

In addition, she reminded brands to capitalize on people that are excited and loyal to the brand from the start.

“Don’t forget about those nano-influencers, or people that you might be seeing on social media, posting about your brand, that might have two or 3,000 followers because in three to five years from now, they might be the people with 100,000 followers,” she said.

Join 100,000+ fellow marketers who advance their skills and knowledge by subscribing to our weekly newsletter.

WATCH OUR 2019 PROMO

 

The post Inside the Influencer-Marketer Partnership: Tips from Julius appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/06/inside-the-influencer-marketer-partnership-tips-from-julius/

Building Relationships and Strengthening Brand Loyalty through Personalization: Tips from Collective Bias, an Inmar Platform

Only 22 percent of shoppers are satisfied with the level of personalization they currently receive from businesses despite 80 percent of brands feeling they meet customer expectations “extremely well.”

This discrepancy has resulted in a whopping 75 billion revenue loss for companies every year — but there is an upside: with this void, there is a huge opportunity for traditional companies to start connecting with their consumers on a more personal level to build relationships and strengthen brand loyalty.

Join SMW Insider to watch this #SMWLA session

Subscribe

During a #SMWLA panel hosted by Leah Logan, Vice President Media Products Strategy and Marketing, Collective Bias, an Inmar platform, representatives from Facebook, HP, and Coty sat down to explore how brands are using data to personalize their communications and why personalization is so important in competing in today’s D2C space.

Personalization = product + loyalty + customer service

Targeting outreach is important when it comes to starting a conversation, but a lot of the focus for businesses is on is supporting the entire purchase journey.

Stated differently, we must think of modern brands in the context of a service, not necessarily the product or commodity it’s delivering. Attributes and level of quality are givens; it’s how you’re going to serve the customer and communicate how you’ll meet their needs that is key to success. Put into a simplified equation: personalization = product + loyalty + customer service.

This notion was echoed across the panelists’ definitions of what personalization means to them in the context of their companies and specific roles.

  • “Personalization is finding out about your customer, their problems, and solving them,” said Austin Ratner, Affiliate + Partnerships Marketing Manager, HP
  • “Personalization is the right product at the right time with the right message built into the right channel…Consumers are expecting brands to add value beyond their product offering,” said Jess Chu, Brand Manager, Fragrance, Coty
  • “Personalization to me is making sure I’m getting stuff that matters to me 100 percent of the time,” said Asher Rapkin, Director, Global Business Marketing, Messenger and Emerging Platforms, Facebook

Adding value through data

Brands are using data primarily to shorten the distance between the consumer and their particular objective, and in turn, introduce a unique value-add to the overall experience.

Chu introduced the example of Johnson & Johnson’s Zyrtec team, which tracks a variety of data points in the backend even before the need — in this case allergies — is identified. They then deliver their messaging based on a person’s geographic location and what the pollen count is for that area.

Utilizing data should be less about segmenting audiences and more about “how do we let a consumer raise their hand and say, ‘I’ll tell you what I’m looking for, and if you can utilize the knowledge you have to deliver the thing that will be most useful, then you have met my expectations,’” said Rapkin.

Leveraging new tools & emerging tech

Meeting consumer objectives directly and accurately was a unanimous theme raised by the panelists when discussing the use of new and emerging technologies.

Instead of using technical jargon, HP describes their computers in a user-first perspective so that their customers can easily choose a laptop that works for them.

Similarly, Facebook’s approach tries to distill down what exactly it is the individual is ultimately trying to achieve by employing an objective-driven approach to utilizing new technologies.

“Whether this is done through a mobile app, a website, an ad unit, or in a virtual world, whichever is the most effective emerging technology is the best technology to meet the goal, regardless of novelty,” Rapkin stated.

The convergence of content & commerce

Influencer partnerships can help brands get consumer feedback on their products. Give your influencers campaign goals and seek feedback frequently. Make it a conversation.

In this way, you can compress distance and more successfully take feedback to heart and incorporate it in a way that will be viewed favorably amongst your target audiences.

“We think of influencers as brand advocates in the sense that we want them to be able to talk about how our products fit into their life authentically. We never want them to push a product just because,” Chu explained.

In the fragrance world, this is beneficial to consumers especially because choices are keenly reflective of a person’s lifestyle. Is this for me? Is it recommended by someone I trust and who knows me? These are all questions that closing the loop between a person’s point of discovery and point of conversion can address.

By being connected through social commerce in this way, “we can shorten the path to purchase and get it to consumers in their hands in a very frictionless way,” she added.

Advice to traditional brands in competing with D2C competitors

  • Focus explicitly on the opportunity or the problem; not the experience first
  • Diversify your choices and solutions
  • Don’t be deterred by the need to “catch up”

Join 100,000+ fellow marketers who advance their skills and knowledge by subscribing to our weekly newsletter.

WATCH OUR 2019 PROMO

The post Building Relationships and Strengthening Brand Loyalty through Personalization: Tips from Collective Bias, an Inmar Platform appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/06/building-relationships-and-strengthening-brand-loyalty-through-personalization-tips-from-collective-bias-an-inmar-platform/

Building Relationships and Strengthening Brand Loyalty through Personalization: Tips from Collective Bias, an Inmar Platform

Only 22 percent of shoppers are satisfied with the level of personalization they currently receive from businesses despite 80 percent of brands feeling they meet customer expectations “extremely well.”

This discrepancy has resulted in a whopping 75 billion revenue loss for companies every year — but there is an upside: with this void, there is a huge opportunity for traditional companies to start connecting with their consumers on a more personal level to build relationships and strengthen brand loyalty.

Join SMW Insider to watch this #SMWLA session

Subscribe

During a #SMWLA panel hosted by Leah Logan, Vice President Media Products Strategy and Marketing, Collective Bias, an Inmar platform, representatives from Facebook, HP, and Coty sat down to explore how brands are using data to personalize their communications and why personalization is so important in competing in today’s D2C space.

Personalization = product + loyalty + customer service

Targeting outreach is important when it comes to starting a conversation, but a lot of the focus for businesses is on is supporting the entire purchase journey.

Stated differently, we must think of modern brands in the context of a service, not necessarily the product or commodity it’s delivering. Attributes and level of quality are givens; it’s how you’re going to serve the customer and communicate how you’ll meet their needs that is key to success. Put into a simplified equation: personalization = product + loyalty + customer service.

This notion was echoed across the panelists’ definitions of what personalization means to them in the context of their companies and specific roles.

  • “Personalization is finding out about your customer, their problems, and solving them,” said Austin Ratner, Affiliate + Partnerships Marketing Manager, HP
  • “Personalization is the right product at the right time with the right message built into the right channel…Consumers are expecting brands to add value beyond their product offering,” said Jess Chu, Brand Manager, Fragrance, Coty
  • “Personalization to me is making sure I’m getting stuff that matters to me 100 percent of the time,” said Asher Rapkin, Director, Global Business Marketing, Messenger and Emerging Platforms, Facebook

Adding value through data

Brands are using data primarily to shorten the distance between the consumer and their particular objective, and in turn, introduce a unique value-add to the overall experience.

Chu introduced the example of Johnson & Johnson’s Zyrtec team, which tracks a variety of data points in the backend even before the need — in this case allergies — is identified. They then deliver their messaging based on a person’s geographic location and what the pollen count is for that area.

Utilizing data should be less about segmenting audiences and more about “how do we let a consumer raise their hand and say, ‘I’ll tell you what I’m looking for, and if you can utilize the knowledge you have to deliver the thing that will be most useful, then you have met my expectations,’” said Rapkin.

Leveraging new tools & emerging tech

Meeting consumer objectives directly and accurately was a unanimous theme raised by the panelists when discussing the use of new and emerging technologies.

Instead of using technical jargon, HP describes their computers in a user-first perspective so that their customers can easily choose a laptop that works for them.

Similarly, Facebook’s approach tries to distill down what exactly it is the individual is ultimately trying to achieve by employing an objective-driven approach to utilizing new technologies.

“Whether this is done through a mobile app, a website, an ad unit, or in a virtual world, whichever is the most effective emerging technology is the best technology to meet the goal, regardless of novelty,” Rapkin stated.

The convergence of content & commerce

Influencer partnerships can help brands get consumer feedback on their products. Give your influencers campaign goals and seek feedback frequently. Make it a conversation.

In this way, you can compress distance and more successfully take feedback to heart and incorporate it in a way that will be viewed favorably amongst your target audiences.

“We think of influencers as brand advocates in the sense that we want them to be able to talk about how our products fit into their life authentically. We never want them to push a product just because,” Chu explained.

In the fragrance world, this is beneficial to consumers especially because choices are keenly reflective of a person’s lifestyle. Is this for me? Is it recommended by someone I trust and who knows me? These are all questions that closing the loop between a person’s point of discovery and point of conversion can address.

By being connected through social commerce in this way, “we can shorten the path to purchase and get it to consumers in their hands in a very frictionless way,” she added.

Advice to traditional brands in competing with D2C competitors

  • Focus explicitly on the opportunity or the problem; not the experience first
  • Diversify your choices and solutions
  • Don’t be deterred by the need to “catch up”

Join 100,000+ fellow marketers who advance their skills and knowledge by subscribing to our weekly newsletter.

WATCH OUR 2019 PROMO

The post Building Relationships and Strengthening Brand Loyalty through Personalization: Tips from Collective Bias, an Inmar Platform appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/06/building-relationships-and-strengthening-brand-loyalty-through-personalization-tips-from-collective-bias-an-inmar-platform/

How to Optimize and Drive the Influencer Marketing Bubble: Advice from Social Chain

Influencers should be a cornerstone of every tool kit spend in marketing and advertising. They have the potential to boost business awareness and engagement when used effectively.

Audiences want to see the world through other people’s eyes so that’s why they follow them. Yet, if the influencer doesn’t stand by and remain true to their own vision, audiences catch on fast and they lose engagement via lack of trust and authenticity.

During #SMWLA Oliver Yonchev, the USA Managing Director of Social Chain offered his insights on the topic sharing the five most important lessons marketers should know to navigate the IM climate.

Join SMW Insider to watch this #SMWLA session

Subscribe

Trust is the biggest issue in influencer marketing today: Consumer trust in what influencers have to say sits at just 4 percent and, according to Edelman’s trust barometer, advertising is now in last place of all industries measured with a trust level of 37 percent, behind banking, energy, and telecommunications.

Nobody cares as much about you as you so you need to capture attention.

Human beings have a notoriously short attention span. Mindless scrolling is an easy habit to fall into so you want to make sure the social media content you’re producing is invigorating. This doesn’t have to only concern the aesthetic of it but the context of the content as well as the definition, too. The honest truth is that a lot of users will be prioritizing their own wants and needs when on Instagram – in order for them to make your content a priority, they have to feel like there’s a takeaway from it, whether it be emotive or inspiring, for example.

Great influencers are honest and authentic.

Yonchev highlighted this point by describing the difference between black box companies – those we know little about other than what the leadership tells us – and glass box companies – those who let us see everything they do inside. The latter is the preferred model for marketing. Yonchev proved this through a social experiment carried out by Social Chain that revealed 64 percent of users online responded positively to Elon Musk as opposed to a small 7 percent to Mark Zuckerberg.

Context is what makes good social stories great; create depth.

Depth can be created by understanding cultural moments (in sport, entertainment, political, etc.), emotional sentiment and current reactions, social first distribution, and by understanding people. A person’s own influences and actions are influenced by the actions of the majority of the group.

Don’t conflate follower size with influence.

Work with people who represent your brand’s values and do it consistently. Between five and ten billion dollars is expected to be spent on influencer marketing next year, so it’s essential to note that direct ROI spend doesn’t necessarily equate to bigger returns. Nano followers and micro-influencers are the way forward and you should pay attention to the correlation between engagement and revenue and not following and revenue.

When receiving a cost you need to determine what you’re buying: you’re buying an endorsement, their word, their audience and you’re asking them to create something. What’s their actual audience reach? Engagement rate? Supply and demand? Industry averages? Most importantly, is what you’re asking them to create risky?

Know what you’re buying, develop robust processes, and invest in the right tools to protect yourself.

Don’t fall victim to fraud. Yonchev left attendees with a description of the tool Social Chain is developing, using AI technology, which is able to predict an influencer’s engagement curve over the long-term so you’re can assess whether their growth is organic or fed by bot farms.

Join 100,000+ fellow marketers who advance their skills and knowledge by subscribing to our weekly newsletter.

WATCH OUR SMWLDN 2019 PROMO

The post How to Optimize and Drive the Influencer Marketing Bubble: Advice from Social Chain appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/06/how-to-optimize-and-drive-the-influencer-marketing-bubble-advice-from-social-chain/

How to Optimize and Drive the Influencer Marketing Bubble: Advice from Social Chain

Influencers should be a cornerstone of every tool kit spend in marketing and advertising. They have the potential to boost business awareness and engagement when used effectively.

Audiences want to see the world through other people’s eyes so that’s why they follow them. Yet, if the influencer doesn’t stand by and remain true to their own vision, audiences catch on fast and they lose engagement via lack of trust and authenticity.

During #SMWLA Oliver Yonchev, the USA Managing Director of Social Chain offered his insights on the topic sharing the five most important lessons marketers should know to navigate the IM climate.

Join SMW Insider to watch this #SMWLA session

Subscribe

Trust is the biggest issue in influencer marketing today: Consumer trust in what influencers have to say sits at just 4 percent and, according to Edelman’s trust barometer, advertising is now in last place of all industries measured with a trust level of 37 percent, behind banking, energy, and telecommunications.

Nobody cares as much about you as you so you need to capture attention.

Human beings have a notoriously short attention span. Mindless scrolling is an easy habit to fall into so you want to make sure the social media content you’re producing is invigorating. This doesn’t have to only concern the aesthetic of it but the context of the content as well as the definition, too. The honest truth is that a lot of users will be prioritizing their own wants and needs when on Instagram – in order for them to make your content a priority, they have to feel like there’s a takeaway from it, whether it be emotive or inspiring, for example.

Great influencers are honest and authentic.

Yonchev highlighted this point by describing the difference between black box companies – those we know little about other than what the leadership tells us – and glass box companies – those who let us see everything they do inside. The latter is the preferred model for marketing. Yonchev proved this through a social experiment carried out by Social Chain that revealed 64 percent of users online responded positively to Elon Musk as opposed to a small 7 percent to Mark Zuckerberg.

Context is what makes good social stories great; create depth.

Depth can be created by understanding cultural moments (in sport, entertainment, political, etc.), emotional sentiment and current reactions, social first distribution, and by understanding people. A person’s own influences and actions are influenced by the actions of the majority of the group.

Don’t conflate follower size with influence.

Work with people who represent your brand’s values and do it consistently. Between five and ten billion dollars is expected to be spent on influencer marketing next year, so it’s essential to note that direct ROI spend doesn’t necessarily equate to bigger returns. Nano followers and micro-influencers are the way forward and you should pay attention to the correlation between engagement and revenue and not following and revenue.

When receiving a cost you need to determine what you’re buying: you’re buying an endorsement, their word, their audience and you’re asking them to create something. What’s their actual audience reach? Engagement rate? Supply and demand? Industry averages? Most importantly, is what you’re asking them to create risky?

Know what you’re buying, develop robust processes, and invest in the right tools to protect yourself.

Don’t fall victim to fraud. Yonchev left attendees with a description of the tool Social Chain is developing, using AI technology, which is able to predict an influencer’s engagement curve over the long-term so you’re can assess whether their growth is organic or fed by bot farms.

Join 100,000+ fellow marketers who advance their skills and knowledge by subscribing to our weekly newsletter.

WATCH OUR SMWLDN 2019 PROMO

The post How to Optimize and Drive the Influencer Marketing Bubble: Advice from Social Chain appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/06/how-to-optimize-and-drive-the-influencer-marketing-bubble-advice-from-social-chain/