Tag: fake news

4 Major Brands and Platforms Addressing Digital Literacy and Fake News in 2020

The majority of marketers realize the issues presented by fake news and “deepfake” techniques in skewing the information we’re exposed to and the implications for determining what is fact from fiction.

We face a critical point in our industry where many brands and platforms are facing increased pressure for setting a benchmark for detecting these types of conversations.

Here are a few that are taking action in 2020.

Tumblr’s Digital Literacy Initiative “World Wide What”

With the 2020 election on the horizon, social media platforms are making moves to update their strategies to curb the spread of information. The latest to join the bandwagon is Tumblr, which recently launched an internet literacy campaign targeted to help younger demographics entering the voting scene spot fake news and unsavory posts.

The initiative, World Wide What, was developed in partnership with UK-based internet literacy organization, Ditch the Label. The campaign’s structure emphasizes six core community topics in video form that include fake news skewed views, authenticity, cyberbullying, the importance of minimizing screen time, how much we share online, and creating a safer internet through moderation.

Unlike traditional literacy materials, the platform is tapping into visual, more culturally messaging such as GIFs, memes, and short text in line with imagery native to the Tumblr brand. Videos will also leverage outside experts and industry leaders to tackle certain subjects through a series of Q&As in the coming weeks and months.

“We are constantly striving to learn and utilize new ways to create a safe place for our communities,” Tumblr shared in a statement on the World Wide What site.

Google x Jigsaw Visual Database of Deepfakes

In September 2019, Google tapped Jigsaw in an effort to develop a dataset of visual deepfakes aimed to boost early detection efforts. The tech giant worked with both paid and consenting actors to record and gather hundreds of videos which ultimately were crafted into deepfakes. The final products including both real and fake videos, were then incorporated into the Technical University of Munich and the FaceForensics benchmark and made widely available for synthetic video detection methods.

Fast forward to November, Jigsaw has continued on this momentum by releasing what it refers to as “the largest public data set of comments and annotations with toxicity labels and identity labels. “ This includes the addition of comments and annotations with toxicity and identity labels. The goal with incorporating these details is to more accurately measure bias within AI comment classification systems. Traditionally conversations are measured with synthetic data from template sentences that often fail to address the complexity and variety of comments.

“By labeling identity mentions in real data, we are able to measure bias in our models in a more realistic setting, and we hope to enable further research into unintended bias across the field,” shared in a recent Medium post. The key in the ever-evolving deepfake tech space will be a healthy and growing research community.

Twitter Policies Targeting Synthetic and Manipulated Media

Twitter is looking to its community for support in fleshing out its strategy for addressing synthetic and manipulated media, what the company defines as “…any photo, audio, or video that has been significantly altered or fabricated in a way that intends to mislead people or changes its original meaning.

As a draft to its policy, the platform has outlined that it will:

  • Place a notice next to Tweets that share synthetic or manipulated media
  • Warn people before they share or like Tweets with synthetic or manipulated media
  • Add a link – for example, to a news article or Twitter Moment – so that people can read more about why various sources believe the media is synthetic or manipulated

The platform also vowed to remove any deepfake believed capable of threatening someone or leading to serious harm. This raises the question as to how it would address these types of manipulated conversations spurring a falsity but not technically causing harm or that use newer creation methods that lag behind the detection techniques.

To garner feedback from users, the platform created a multiple-choice survey that addresses the broader preference of removing versus flagging (e.g. should altered photos and videos be removed, have warning labels, or not be removed at all). To date, the survey is closed and the platform is reported to be working on an official policy that will be announced 30 days prior to roll out.

Facebook’s “Deepfake Challenge” and Ban

This past fall Facebook teamed up with Amazon Web Services (AWS), Microsoft, and academics from Cornell Tech, University of Oxford, UC Berkley, University of Maryland, and SUNY Albany to launch the Deepfake Detection Challenge. The DFDC as its referred to includes a data set of 100k+ videos using paid actors — as well as grants and awards —aimed to inspire new ways of detecting and preventing AI-manipulated media.

The DFDC will run to the end of March of this year with the goal of “…producing technology that everyone can use to better detect when AI has been used to alter a video in order to mislead the viewer.” According to the official website, a winner will be determined based on “a test mechanism that enables teams to score the effectiveness of their models, against one or more black-box tests from our founding partners,” the company shared.

‘Deepfake’ techniques, which present realistic AI-generated videos of real people doing and saying fictional things, have significant implications for determining the legitimacy of information presented online,” shared Facebook CTO Mike Schroepfer in a recent blog post.

In addition to these efforts, the platform followed up with a new policy that would remove synthesized or edited content in ways that “aren’t apparent to an average person and would likely mislead,” or deepfake posts that use AI technologies to “merge, replace, or superimpose content onto a video, making it appear authentic.”

Again, the issue becomes how we as an industry will move forward walking the fine line between malicious deepfakes and those with less-harmful intents of creative parodies or satire.

Learn more about this topic as part of our 2020 theme HUMAN.X through the lens of the subtheme Privacy Matters. Read the official announcement here and secure your early-bird discount today to save 20% on your full-conference pass to #SMWNYC (May 5-7, 2020).

Join 100,000+ fellow marketers who advance their skills and knowledge by subscribing to our weekly newsletter.

WATCH THE SMWNYC 2019 RECAP

The post 4 Major Brands and Platforms Addressing Digital Literacy and Fake News in 2020 appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2020/01/4-major-brands-and-platforms-addressing-digital-literacy-and-fake-news-in-2020/

Getting Savvy in a Post-Trust Era with Shiv Singh

We are living in what is possibly the most difficult time to tell apart the real from the fake.

That is what inspired the married couple Shiv Singh, a marketer, speaker, and advisor, and Rohini Luthra, a board-certified psychologist, to write the book Savvy.

Join SMW Insider to watch this #SMWNYC session

Subscribe

Singh has learned how to navigate fake companies and leaders, despite living in a “post-trust” era. At Social Media Week New York, Singh broke down the savviest ways to stop perpetuating “fake news” in just five steps.

Don’t be complicit in the fakeness

Focusing on “fake news” to discuss the difficulties in telling apart real headlines from fake ones, Singh cited Deb Roy’s, former chief media scientist at Twitter, research which showed that fake news was shared seven times faster than real news, by real people.

“It’s not just Russian trolls,” Singh said.

How can we stop the perpetuation of fake news? Read more.

Singh specified that if people took time to read beyond the headline, they may find that the “news” is questionable, and thus be less willing to hit “share” on social media.

Fight the urge to always be right

Because Singh wrote Savvy with his wife, he comically claimed to know what it is like to fight the urge to always be right.

“Savvy is part business part psychology,” he said.

He pointed to companies like Tesla, which despite scandalous tweets and broken promises by owner Elon Musk, has continued to thrive throughout the years as its followers would rather feel they are right and choosing a reputation over reality.

“Tesla should not have sold as many cars as it did last year,” Singh said, highlighting the psychology behind people who blindly follow a brand like Tesla, which may be hyped up more than it merits. In the process, they ignore the reality of poor reviews and stories.

That is how badly some people want to be right.

Reevaluate how (and where) you place trust

Think of how, why, and what you are trusting, Singh suggested.

Within Savvy, Singh and Luthra drew on Morton Deutsch’s, a World War II Veteran and researcher of trust, work to find the role of trust in modern-day social networks.

“Deutsch said a fundamental challenge when it comes to trust is that we don’t have shared goals,” Singh shared, “and when we don’t have shared goals, we compete versus collaborate.”

In the context of Facebook, Twitter, and other social media platforms, if the goals of users do not match theirs, it becomes harder and harder to trust them.

“Consumers feel more like data providers than consumers,” Singh said.

With the knowledge that trusting brands saves time as people come to know what they will get time and time again, Singh resolved that ultimately companies have to earn that trust first in order for users to return.

Stop privileging belonging

Singh warned to keep the desire to belong at bay.

“Don’t assume anything,” he warned.

Citing the psychological aspect of Savvy, Singh talked about the phenomenon of “groupthink” (thinking as a group, instead of for one’s self) and how it plays a huge role in perpetuating fake news, particularly in an era where we can join large groups in just a few keystrokes.

“Always trust your own judgment. Don’t belong because it’s a good story, because it’s something that feels special, or because it’s something that everyone else is saying so,” Singh said.

Control the Influence of AI

People may not be aware of how much influence artificial intelligence has when it comes to their day to day browsing online.

Singh posed some reminders. He talked about an Amazon tool for facial recognition and video analysis software known as Rekognition, which performs best on lighter skinned people. The reason? The people coding it have implemented their own biases into the software.

Fears about Amazon’s facial recognition software are tied to civil rights as much as they relate to the problematic intersection of racism and technology.

While Singh believes a product like this should not be deemed really for roll-out, Amazon currently has Rekognition on the market, thereby leaving the control and recognition of these biases up to us.

Join 100,000+ fellow marketers who advance their skills and knowledge by subscribing to our weekly newsletter.

WATCH OUR SMWLA 2019 PROMO

The post Getting Savvy in a Post-Trust Era with Shiv Singh appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/05/getting-savvy-in-a-post-trust-era-with-shiv-singh/

Branding, Selling, and Building Open Trust in a Fake News Era: Strategies from Social Chain

Artificial Intelligence. Data. Influencer campaigns. Social media management and fast-thinking, real-time platforms. With these technologies growing in the digital marketing space, companies need to stay on top of the game in order to use these tools to their advantage.

Steven Bartlett, CEO of Social Chain, shared insights with attendees at his #SMWNYC session, Nobody Trusts or Cares. Here’s How to Sell Anyway. How can brands optimize tech tools to create quality content against their competitors, while keeping up with the fast changes of the digital world?

Bartlett told a story about how he built his first startup company, WallPark, while in college in the U.K., how he was trying different marketing strategies, but nobody cared.

“Three years of blood, sweat, and tears, poured my heart into something, and nobody came to my events; and that’s when I learned my first real lesson about marketing, thinking you’re special — nobody really cared,” Bartlett said. “Really, my job as a marketer was to give them something and to reach them where they were.”

Bartlett turned to the Twitter world for inspiration. He saw viral accounts like the UK-based @FactsofSchool (which tweets about common university student struggles) finding a huge, target audience in 2012, and he partnered with their owners to help beef up their social presence. (@FactsofSchool alone drove about 35,000 student views and engagement per day).

While the typical business strategy is partnering with brands to drive traffic to your website, Bartlett wanted to keep building big social channels across social media, because he understood these platforms were only going to get bigger.

Join SMW Insider to watch this #SMWNYC session

Subscribe

His group began to partner with over 40 young people running viral Twitter, Instagram and Facebook accounts — including @FactsofSchool, @SPORF,@BeFitMotivation and @cupcakegrid — and acquired over 400 of these popular social channels, each with their own robust, active communities online.

Building a young, savvy team (which understands social media more than anybody) with a huge reach in and of itself became an important strategy, Bartlett discovered. Two companies with this audience and knowledge were born from these experiences: Social Chain, a social-first marketing agency; and Media Chain, a leading media group with over 2.5 billion views on social media.

#FakeNews: social media has a PR problem

But with great influence comes great responsibility. When trust is impacted in the social media space, especially in a very non-private way, it can spread a message: both negative and positive.

“It’s been a rough time to be in the industry; there have been stories of fake news which we’ve seen impact everything, not just social media, but trust generally,” says Bartlett. “Fake news just sort of came out of nowhere.”

Understanding culture and customer sentiment, while using emotion and employing a kind of distribution, are all key ingredients to getting fake news to travel.

“These are moments of cultural sensitivity—you see them across politics, with xenophobia, and with ISIS — but if you can take one of these pieces of inflammatory sentiment, you can go a long way.”

With the dawn of fake news, the election of U.S. President Donald Trump, and public political scandals like Facebook and Cambridge Analytica, trust online and with social media has decreased.

“We put money before trust, privacy, morals, and accountability, and now we are paying that price.”

This is why it’s important for brands to be transparent, because “trust is so vitally important,” Bartlett added. It is the glue of human connectivity.”

“We are living in an age of authenticity — and there’s an opportunity to be transparent. One of the most important decisions in branding is leaning into transparency.”

Black box vs. glass box

Whereas a traditional corporate model structure is usually kept internal, as in a “black box,” Bartlett suggests brands transitioning into a more transparent “glass box” approach.

“In a glass box world, you don’t have internal company culture, you have public company culture. Your company culture is your brand.”

By leveraging transparency, business leaders can better reach their consumers and target audience—and thus, build trust and open communication.

Openness is really “on brand.”

“When you look at stats, transparency is actually working for people like Elon Musk, versus Mark Zuckerberg,” said Bartlett.

He compared both CEO/tech giants’ vastly different, active presence–or lack thereof–on social. While Zuckerberg doesn’t interact with his users on Facebook, and seemingly “lives in a bunker,” Bartlett said, Mr. Musk’s blunt, sometimes-controversial Twitter presence actually makes him feel “like a friend to me — even though I don’t know him.”

Transparency and interactivity are in style, and openness should be the main goal.

“With influencer marketing, we know nobody actually really believes it. Everyone knows influencers are paid to show off this stuff. But, there’s a different approach required if you’re going to be effective,” Bartlett finished. “It’s an extension of word of mouth.”

It comes down to two things: the authority factor (having an influencer’s natural endorsement) and the actual reach.

What’s more important than high engagements is having influencers who trust with their audiences/followers. This keeps the lines of communication — valuable selling points for a company — open.

“In order to believe the authority factor, you have to believe endorsement, but the real impact is in the reach.”

Join 100,000+ fellow marketers who advance their skills and knowledge by subscribing to our weekly newsletter.

WATCH OUR SMWLA 2019 PROMO

The post Branding, Selling, and Building Open Trust in a Fake News Era: Strategies from Social Chain appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/05/branding-selling-and-building-open-trust-in-a-fake-news-era-strategies-from-social-chain/

Establishing Trust in a Fake News Era: Best Practices from Code & Theory and SKDKnickerbocker

“Fake news is a term that can be applied in the news category,” said Anita Dunn, Managing Director, SKDKnickerbocker during a #SMWNYC session hosted by Code and Theory President, Michael Treff.

“A challenge for politicians in 2020 will be deciding what’s true. People struggle to find credible news outlets.” Dunn has spent an admirable amount of time working in politics, from interning at President Carter’s re-election to her current role at SKDKnickerboker — a practice more around advocacy and the public dialogue, as opposed to the electoral, allowing her to watch the concept of fake news grow and evolve.

Join SMW Insider to watch this #SMWNYC session

Subscribe

Treff agreed and was quick to note that brands, including Adidas, feel as if they are under attack by it and don’t know how to respond.

The two also agreed that deciding what issues to get involved in, politically and socially, poses a high-risk assessment. It’s vital for brands to engage with the policies of their assumed consumers and demographics. focusing on their product alone is ineffective when seeking engagement. However, it is important to remember that when putting their voice out there, brands hold their own authority. Their high visibility prompts them to maintain a respectful demeanor at all times.

Treff notes that “at the end of the day, brands are businesses and they’re trying to advance their agenda for profit.” Consumers have a right to be skeptical and brands taking positions on issues that directly benefit them on the commercial bottom line is always going to be a risky move.

Social Media & CEOs

However, social media has enabled CEO’s to exist more at the forefront of their company and speak directly with politicians as well as citizens. Before deciding to put themselves forward though, an ethos and their safety must be decided. “You need consensus from a senior leadership team in what you’re going to engage in and that’s true for politicians as well,” Dunn explained. “CEO’s increasingly can’t hide from issues as there’s an expectation they’re going to say something on it from shareholders and employees.”

All major tech companies have traditionally been aligned with the White House. The way in which social platforms are used has become more sophisticated – Republicans see privacy as censorship.

Treff understands that the majority of large tech companies are in some sort of ‘hot water’ and that there is a “survivalist nature instinct” in dealing with controversies and flaws.

Best Practices for a Positive Future

In order to move forward online in an effective, trusting way, a brand must do the following three steps:

  1. Establish your business model. Are you a publisher? Subscription based? How you make money impacts your distribution process.
  2. Respond to issues and queries on your socials as opposed to your own platform as you can react in real time and speed in response is effective in building trust.
  3. Think about the type of content you’re creating and where it’s being delivered. For example, storytelling and investigative journalism don’t have that much impact on social media and typically those types of pieces are perceived as too long in length. Audiences look to social media for short and snappy delivery of content, which can lead to sloppy journalism and bad fact checking if the brand or outlet isn’t careful.

It’s important to remember that whilst fake news is being churned out on social media, there are those online who are able to out inaccuracy immediately by personal experience and direct knowledge. For everything the public is able to hold power accountable for, people on the other side are able to power it too. You just have to be engaged in the conversation, no matter what side you’re on.

Join 100,000+ fellow marketers who advance their skills and knowledge by subscribing to our weekly newsletter.

WATCH OUR SMWLA 2019 PROMO

The post Establishing Trust in a Fake News Era: Best Practices from Code & Theory and SKDKnickerbocker appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/05/establishing-trust-in-a-fake-news-era-best-practices-from-code-theory-and-skdknickerbocker/

Establishing Trust in a Fake News Era: Best Practices from Code & Theory and SKDKnickerbocker

“Fake news is a term that can be applied in the news category,” said Anita Dunn, Managing Director, SKDKnickerbocker during a #SMWNYC session hosted by Code and Theory President, Michael Treff.

“A challenge for politicians in 2020 will be deciding what’s true. People struggle to find credible news outlets.” Dunn has spent an admirable amount of time working in politics, from interning at President Carter’s re-election to her current role at SKDKnickerboker — a practice more around advocacy and the public dialogue, as opposed to the electoral, allowing her to watch the concept of fake news grow and evolve.

Join SMW Insider to watch this #SMWNYC session

Subscribe

Treff agreed and was quick to note that brands, including Adidas, feel as if they are under attack by it and don’t know how to respond.

The two also agreed that deciding what issues to get involved in, politically and socially, poses a high-risk assessment. It’s vital for brands to engage with the policies of their assumed consumers and demographics. focusing on their product alone is ineffective when seeking engagement. However, it is important to remember that when putting their voice out there, brands hold their own authority. Their high visibility prompts them to maintain a respectful demeanor at all times.

Treff notes that “at the end of the day, brands are businesses and they’re trying to advance their agenda for profit.” Consumers have a right to be skeptical and brands taking positions on issues that directly benefit them on the commercial bottom line is always going to be a risky move.

Social Media & CEOs

However, social media has enabled CEO’s to exist more at the forefront of their company and speak directly with politicians as well as citizens. Before deciding to put themselves forward though, an ethos and their safety must be decided. “You need consensus from a senior leadership team in what you’re going to engage in and that’s true for politicians as well,” Dunn explained. “CEO’s increasingly can’t hide from issues as there’s an expectation they’re going to say something on it from shareholders and employees.”

All major tech companies have traditionally been aligned with the White House. The way in which social platforms are used has become more sophisticated – Republicans see privacy as censorship.

Treff understands that the majority of large tech companies are in some sort of ‘hot water’ and that there is a “survivalist nature instinct” in dealing with controversies and flaws.

Best Practices for a Positive Future

In order to move forward online in an effective, trusting way, a brand must do the following three steps:

  1. Establish your business model. Are you a publisher? Subscription based? How you make money impacts your distribution process.
  2. Respond to issues and queries on your socials as opposed to your own platform as you can react in real time and speed in response is effective in building trust.
  3. Think about the type of content you’re creating and where it’s being delivered. For example, storytelling and investigative journalism don’t have that much impact on social media and typically those types of pieces are perceived as too long in length. Audiences look to social media for short and snappy delivery of content, which can lead to sloppy journalism and bad fact checking if the brand or outlet isn’t careful.

It’s important to remember that whilst fake news is being churned out on social media, there are those online who are able to out inaccuracy immediately by personal experience and direct knowledge. For everything the public is able to hold power accountable for, people on the other side are able to power it too. You just have to be engaged in the conversation, no matter what side you’re on.

Join 100,000+ fellow marketers who advance their skills and knowledge by subscribing to our weekly newsletter.

WATCH OUR SMWLA 2019 PROMO

The post Establishing Trust in a Fake News Era: Best Practices from Code & Theory and SKDKnickerbocker appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/05/establishing-trust-in-a-fake-news-era-best-practices-from-code-theory-and-skdknickerbocker/

Establishing Trust in a Fake News Era: Best Practices from Code & Theory and SKDKnickerbocker

“Fake news is a term that can be applied in the news category,” said Anita Dunn, Managing Director, SKDKnickerbocker during a #SMWNYC session hosted by Code and Theory President, Michael Treff.

“A challenge for politicians in 2020 will be deciding what’s true. People struggle to find credible news outlets.” Dunn has spent an admirable amount of time working in politics, from interning at President Carter’s re-election to her current role at SKDKnickerboker — a practice more around advocacy and the public dialogue, as opposed to the electoral, allowing her to watch the concept of fake news grow and evolve.

Join SMW Insider to watch this #SMWNYC session

Subscribe

Treff agreed and was quick to note that brands, including Adidas, feel as if they are under attack by it and don’t know how to respond.

The two also agreed that deciding what issues to get involved in, politically and socially, poses a high-risk assessment. It’s vital for brands to engage with the policies of their assumed consumers and demographics. focusing on their product alone is ineffective when seeking engagement. However, it is important to remember that when putting their voice out there, brands hold their own authority. Their high visibility prompts them to maintain a respectful demeanor at all times.

Treff notes that “at the end of the day, brands are businesses and they’re trying to advance their agenda for profit.” Consumers have a right to be skeptical and brands taking positions on issues that directly benefit them on the commercial bottom line is always going to be a risky move.

Social Media & CEOs

However, social media has enabled CEO’s to exist more at the forefront of their company and speak directly with politicians as well as citizens. Before deciding to put themselves forward though, an ethos and their safety must be decided. “You need consensus from a senior leadership team in what you’re going to engage in and that’s true for politicians as well,” Dunn explained. “CEO’s increasingly can’t hide from issues as there’s an expectation they’re going to say something on it from shareholders and employees.”

All major tech companies have traditionally been aligned with the White House. The way in which social platforms are used has become more sophisticated – Republicans see privacy as censorship.

Treff understands that the majority of large tech companies are in some sort of ‘hot water’ and that there is a “survivalist nature instinct” in dealing with controversies and flaws.

Best Practices for a Positive Future

In order to move forward online in an effective, trusting way, a brand must do the following three steps:

  1. Establish your business model. Are you a publisher? Subscription based? How you make money impacts your distribution process.
  2. Respond to issues and queries on your socials as opposed to your own platform as you can react in real time and speed in response is effective in building trust.
  3. Think about the type of content you’re creating and where it’s being delivered. For example, storytelling and investigative journalism don’t have that much impact on social media and typically those types of pieces are perceived as too long in length. Audiences look to social media for short and snappy delivery of content, which can lead to sloppy journalism and bad fact checking if the brand or outlet isn’t careful.

It’s important to remember that whilst fake news is being churned out on social media, there are those online who are able to out inaccuracy immediately by personal experience and direct knowledge. For everything the public is able to hold power accountable for, people on the other side are able to power it too. You just have to be engaged in the conversation, no matter what side you’re on.

Join 100,000+ fellow marketers who advance their skills and knowledge by subscribing to our weekly newsletter.

WATCH OUR SMWLA 2019 PROMO

The post Establishing Trust in a Fake News Era: Best Practices from Code & Theory and SKDKnickerbocker appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/05/establishing-trust-in-a-fake-news-era-best-practices-from-code-theory-and-skdknickerbocker/

Establishing Trust in a Fake News Era: Best Practices from Code & Theory and SKDKnickerbocker

“Fake news is a term that can be applied in the news category,” said Anita Dunn, Managing Director, SKDKnickerbocker during a #SMWNYC session hosted by Code and Theory President, Michael Treff.

“A challenge for politicians in 2020 will be deciding what’s true. People struggle to find credible news outlets.” Dunn has spent an admirable amount of time working in politics, from interning at President Carter’s re-election to her current role at SKDKnickerboker — a practice more around advocacy and the public dialogue, as opposed to the electoral, allowing her to watch the concept of fake news grow and evolve.

Join SMW Insider to watch this #SMWNYC session

Subscribe

Treff agreed and was quick to note that brands, including Adidas, feel as if they are under attack by it and don’t know how to respond.

The two also agreed that deciding what issues to get involved in, politically and socially, poses a high-risk assessment. It’s vital for brands to engage with the policies of their assumed consumers and demographics. focusing on their product alone is ineffective when seeking engagement. However, it is important to remember that when putting their voice out there, brands hold their own authority. Their high visibility prompts them to maintain a respectful demeanor at all times.

Treff notes that “at the end of the day, brands are businesses and they’re trying to advance their agenda for profit.” Consumers have a right to be skeptical and brands taking positions on issues that directly benefit them on the commercial bottom line is always going to be a risky move.

Social Media & CEOs

However, social media has enabled CEO’s to exist more at the forefront of their company and speak directly with politicians as well as citizens. Before deciding to put themselves forward though, an ethos and their safety must be decided. “You need consensus from a senior leadership team in what you’re going to engage in and that’s true for politicians as well,” Dunn explained. “CEO’s increasingly can’t hide from issues as there’s an expectation they’re going to say something on it from shareholders and employees.”

All major tech companies have traditionally been aligned with the White House. The way in which social platforms are used has become more sophisticated – Republicans see privacy as censorship.

Treff understands that the majority of large tech companies are in some sort of ‘hot water’ and that there is a “survivalist nature instinct” in dealing with controversies and flaws.

Best Practices for a Positive Future

In order to move forward online in an effective, trusting way, a brand must do the following three steps:

  1. Establish your business model. Are you a publisher? Subscription based? How you make money impacts your distribution process.
  2. Respond to issues and queries on your socials as opposed to your own platform as you can react in real time and speed in response is effective in building trust.
  3. Think about the type of content you’re creating and where it’s being delivered. For example, storytelling and investigative journalism don’t have that much impact on social media and typically those types of pieces are perceived as too long in length. Audiences look to social media for short and snappy delivery of content, which can lead to sloppy journalism and bad fact checking if the brand or outlet isn’t careful.

It’s important to remember that whilst fake news is being churned out on social media, there are those online who are able to out inaccuracy immediately by personal experience and direct knowledge. For everything the public is able to hold power accountable for, people on the other side are able to power it too. You just have to be engaged in the conversation, no matter what side you’re on.

Join 100,000+ fellow marketers who advance their skills and knowledge by subscribing to our weekly newsletter.

WATCH OUR SMWLA 2019 PROMO

The post Establishing Trust in a Fake News Era: Best Practices from Code & Theory and SKDKnickerbocker appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/05/establishing-trust-in-a-fake-news-era-best-practices-from-code-theory-and-skdknickerbocker/

Establishing Trust in a Fake News Era: Best Practices from Code & Theory and SKDKnickerbocker

“Fake news is a term that can be applied in the news category,” said Anita Dunn, Managing Director, SKDKnickerbocker during a #SMWNYC session hosted by Code and Theory President, Michael Treff.

“A challenge for politicians in 2020 will be deciding what’s true. People struggle to find credible news outlets.” Dunn has spent an admirable amount of time working in politics, from interning at President Carter’s re-election to her current role at SKDKnickerboker — a practice more around advocacy and the public dialogue, as opposed to the electoral, allowing her to watch the concept of fake news grow and evolve.

Join SMW Insider to watch this #SMWNYC session

Subscribe

Treff agreed and was quick to note that brands, including Adidas, feel as if they are under attack by it and don’t know how to respond.

The two also agreed that deciding what issues to get involved in, politically and socially, poses a high-risk assessment. It’s vital for brands to engage with the policies of their assumed consumers and demographics. focusing on their product alone is ineffective when seeking engagement. However, it is important to remember that when putting their voice out there, brands hold their own authority. Their high visibility prompts them to maintain a respectful demeanor at all times.

Treff notes that “at the end of the day, brands are businesses and they’re trying to advance their agenda for profit.” Consumers have a right to be skeptical and brands taking positions on issues that directly benefit them on the commercial bottom line is always going to be a risky move.

Social Media & CEOs

However, social media has enabled CEO’s to exist more at the forefront of their company and speak directly with politicians as well as citizens. Before deciding to put themselves forward though, an ethos and their safety must be decided. “You need consensus from a senior leadership team in what you’re going to engage in and that’s true for politicians as well,” Dunn explained. “CEO’s increasingly can’t hide from issues as there’s an expectation they’re going to say something on it from shareholders and employees.”

All major tech companies have traditionally been aligned with the White House. The way in which social platforms are used has become more sophisticated – Republicans see privacy as censorship.

Treff understands that the majority of large tech companies are in some sort of ‘hot water’ and that there is a “survivalist nature instinct” in dealing with controversies and flaws.

Best Practices for a Positive Future

In order to move forward online in an effective, trusting way, a brand must do the following three steps:

  1. Establish your business model. Are you a publisher? Subscription based? How you make money impacts your distribution process.
  2. Respond to issues and queries on your socials as opposed to your own platform as you can react in real time and speed in response is effective in building trust.
  3. Think about the type of content you’re creating and where it’s being delivered. For example, storytelling and investigative journalism don’t have that much impact on social media and typically those types of pieces are perceived as too long in length. Audiences look to social media for short and snappy delivery of content, which can lead to sloppy journalism and bad fact checking if the brand or outlet isn’t careful.

It’s important to remember that whilst fake news is being churned out on social media, there are those online who are able to out inaccuracy immediately by personal experience and direct knowledge. For everything the public is able to hold power accountable for, people on the other side are able to power it too. You just have to be engaged in the conversation, no matter what side you’re on.

Join 100,000+ fellow marketers who advance their skills and knowledge by subscribing to our weekly newsletter.

WATCH OUR SMWLA 2019 PROMO

The post Establishing Trust in a Fake News Era: Best Practices from Code & Theory and SKDKnickerbocker appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/05/establishing-trust-in-a-fake-news-era-best-practices-from-code-theory-and-skdknickerbocker/

How to Master Storytelling in the Fake News Era

In an era of fake news, it can be easy for storytelling to get caught alongside untrue or unsavory content.

A recent Gallup poll found that in 2018 only 45 percent of Americans claimed they had “a great deal or fair amount of confidence” in the mass media. While this figure showed signs of improvement — up from 41 percent in 2017 and 32 percent in 2016 — there is undoubtedly more room for growth.

Sixty-percent of survey respondents in a separate Gallup study claimed they were less likely to share stories from sites clearly marked as unreliable. Results also showed they were more likely to trust stories from websites labeled credible, pointing to one potentially effective approach for the future: labels.

But, it isn’t solely the ethical responsibility of the social platforms that host the misinformation or negative content to guard us.

At #SMWNYC next month, we’ll explore the responsibility we as storytellers have to reverse the trend of increasingly fake and negative information as well as the opportunities we can embrace to spread positive content with the potential to shape the future.

Taking responsibility

Shiv Singh, Founder and CEO, Savvy Matters will center his session on how we accept and perpetuate fake news. Specifically, he’ll outline ways to identify exaggerated truths and avoid perpetuating these experiences as well as offer a retrospective on 2018’s misrepresentation across social media feeds.

Establishing trust & ensuring integrity

Michael Treff, President, Code and Theory will discuss a variety of topics pertaining to notion of trust including methods for understanding what this term means today, the landscape of trust in brands and publishers, how brands should perceive the effect of safety as it relates to illegitimate content and how to identify good indicators of trust from a measurement perspective.

Moving beyond a “social first” world

Neil Vogel, CEO Of Dotdash will describe how he and his team have been able to scale their digital publishing business by not only focusing on traffic generated from social networks like Facebook. Rather, they emphasize producing the best content on the fastest websites that host respectful advertising as key to guaranteeing success for the future.

There’s still time to join these speakers and many more at Social Media Week New York this spring (April 30-May 2, at the Sheraton New York Times Square) – so act fast, and look toward a future of truthful storytelling with us!

View the final agenda and grab your pass for our 11th annual event — our most expansive program to date — to guarantee your place before they’re gone.

Join 100,000+ fellow marketers who advance their skills and knowledge by subscribing to our weekly newsletter.

WATCH OUR 2019 PROMO

The post How to Master Storytelling in the Fake News Era appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/04/how-to-master-storytelling-in-the-fake-news-era/

The Unlikely Frontrunner in Muffling Misinformation? Pinterest.

It’s a problem that’s stymied many social media platforms: quelling the spread of misinformation, and punishing the bad actors that contribute to its rise. Amidst high-profile efforts from Twitter and Facebook to suspend these account, and the consequences that YouTube currently faces for not doing so, Pinterest has quietly but effectively enacted a solution that seems to be working.

Currently viewed as a place to find inspiration for craft projects, fashion, and fitness, Pinterest finds itself plagued by a very specific type of misinformation: namely, those centered around anti-vaccination and other phony health claims. Information “pinned” at a point of origin can be searched, spread, and repinned en masse within a short period. But what if those in search of those sorts of information, couldn’t find it?

As Fast Company reported, “the company now blocks anti-vaccination searches across the board, and it even deletes anti-vaccination content it detects that is uploaded to the site.” Their manager of public policy and social impact, Ifeoma Ozoma, has been unequivocal in her stance on why this is the right approach for them: “people come to our platform to find inspiration, and there’s nothing inspiring about harmful content.” Their misinformation policy echoes this philosophy, reading:

We remove harmful advice, content that targets individuals or protected groups, and content created as part of disinformation campaigns.

It may raise questions about what role platforms should have in arbiting what precisely can be said on its site (in its reporting, the Wall Street Journal called it “the power of tech companies to censor discussion of hot-button issues”). But in making the decision to embrace this course of action, one they also recently undertook to reduce false health claims and false cancer cures, Pinterest decided that the harm these claims could cause was great enough to justify their course of action. It should be noted that individual users can still pin these articles, quotes, and other pieces to their own pages; they simply can’t be spread beyond individual profiles. The approach is one The Verge’s Casey Newton termed “freedom of speech, versus freedom of reach.” In that regard, it’s not unlike the recent measures WhatsApp—a platform plagued by its own crisis of misinformation—took to limit a message’s forwardability.

The pointed stand that Pinterest has taken to limit the spread of these sorts of claims defies years of social media giants insisting that the veracity of claims made on their sites, is not their problem. Samuel Woolley, researcher for the Institute for the Future think tank, noted in the Wall Street Journal, “Until recently, social media companies have drawn a line in the sand saying they’re not arbiters of truth; that they are passive purveyors of information.”

Again, Ozoma affirmed the site’s right, and indeed responsibility, to push back when claims are demonstrably false: “right now we’re focused on misinformation that can cause real-world harm.” She went on to say of the information that does remain on the site, “it’s better not to serve those results than to lead people down what is like a recommendation rabbit hole.” Similar rabbitholes are proving to be the undoing of YouTube at present, as they face advertiser horror and pushback over search results that expose both child endangerment and anti-vaccination propaganda.

While some may say that Pinterest’s hard line is unsustainable for larger sites, Newton seems to believe that if a platform cares enough to make it happen, such moves become sustainable. “If you want to know what taking care of your community looks like—if you want to know what social responsibility for a tech platform looks like—it looks a lot like what Ozoma is [doing].” Indeed, this stance is one that recognizes influence and uses it responsibly; it’ll be telling to see if other platforms take up this mantle of responsibility as a way to combat dangerous claims made in their space.

Join 100,000+ fellow marketers who advance their skills and knowledge by subscribing to our weekly newsletter.

WATCH OUR 2019 PROMO

The post The Unlikely Frontrunner in Muffling Misinformation? Pinterest. appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/02/the-unlikely-frontrunner-in-muffling-misinformation-pinterest/

Mark Zuckerberg Finally Admits Facebook Is a Media Company

It was a small step, perhaps, but still a noteworthy one. After months of denying that Facebook is a media company, Mark Zuckerberg admitted in a recent one-on-one interview with his COO, Sheryl Sandberg, that the social network actually is a media company–although not a traditional one. For years, Zuckerberg has argued that Facebook is…

http://fortune.com/2016/12/23/zuckerberg-media-company/

Facebook Doesn’t Need One Public Editor, It Needs 1,000 of Them

Depending on whom you believe, the problem of fake news on Facebook is either one of the most important issues facing mankind, or an over-blown controversy pumped up by the mainstream media. And in a way, that dichotomy itself points out the problem with defining–let alone actually getting rid of–”fake news.” When someone uses that…

http://fortune.com/2016/11/21/facebook-public-editor/

Facebook Joins Google With Updated Policy Restricting Ads on Fake News Sites

Alphabet’s Google and Facebook on Monday announced measures aimed at halting the spread of “fake news” on the internet by targeting how some purveyors of phony content make money: advertising. Google googl said it is working on a policy change to prevent websites that misrepresent content from using its AdSense advertising network, while Facebook fb…

http://fortune.com/2016/11/15/facebook-google-policy-ads-fake-news/