Tag: Diversity

How YouTube is Supporting Black Creators and Artists

Last summer admist the Black Lives Matter Movement and protests in support of George Floyd, YouTube announced the launch of a multi-year $100 million fund dedicated to amplifying and developing the voices of Black creators and artists and their stories. More specifically, the fund has supported programs such as 2 Chainz’ “Money Maker Fund” series highlighting HBCU entrepreneurs and Masego’s “Studying Abroad” livestreamed concert series.

Today, the platform is using capital for that effort to create a global grant program for Black creators.

“The painful events of this year have reminded us of the importance of human connection and the need to continue to strengthen human rights around the world. In the midst of uncertainty, creators continue to share stories that might not otherwise be heard while also building online communities,” YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki wrote in a blog post detailing the decision and reflecting on 2020.

The #YouTubeBlack Voices Class of 2021

Per Billboard, the program is kicking off with an inaugural class of 132 individuals spanning musicians and lifestyle vloggers including Kelly Stamps and Jabril Ashe, also known as Jabrils, who share educational videos centered around the emerging gaming, technology, and AI spaces.

The musicians named to the group include Brent Faiyaz, BRS Kash, Fireboy DML, Jean Dawson, Jensen McRae, Jerome Farah, Joy Oladokun, KennyHoopla, Mariah the Scientist, MC Carol, Miiesha, Myke Towers, Péricles, Rael, Rexx Life Raj, Sauti Sol, serpentwithfeet, Sho Madjozi, Tkay Maidza, Urias and Yung Baby Tate.

Each grant recipient will be provided an undisclosed funding amount to be used in support of their channels, and can encompass needs such as editing, lighting or other equipment to amplify and enhance the quality of their content. YouTube will also offer additional resources such as workshops, training and networking opportunities to boost skills and fuel meaning collaborations. “We are not only supporting them in the moment, but this is seed funding that will help them to thrive on the platform long-term,” he added.

Hailing from across the United States, Kenya, Brazil, Australia, South Africa and Nigeria, the cohort was selected in part based on their past participation in #YouTubeBlack, a campaign and event series promoting Black creators launched in 2016.

Paving a future for change

“These creators and artists have been doing this work already and are known by their communities, but we’re really excited to invest in them, and we believe that they can and will become household names with this support, shared Malik Ducard, YouTube Vice President of Partners on the #YouTubeBlack community.

In today’s landscape, influencers are themselves a media channel. The budgets put against them shouldn’t just be production-driven but rather emphasize a broader commitment to diverse and authentic stories driven by co-communication and co-creation. For YouTube, this effort is not only beneficial in ensuring these creators have their voices heard, but in allowing the platform to stay true to its goals and values and its commitment to its community.

“This is not a flash-in-the pan Instagram moment. This is about keeping the drum beat of change alive, and in the DNA of our organization,” added Lyor Cohen, YouTube’s Global Head of Music, reiterating the confidence in the ability of this group to lead and find long-term success through raw passion, creativity, and an entrepreneurial spirit. “Our expectation is that these artists are going to be significant and important voices and make music even more enjoyable.”

The future of brand-artist collaborations

For brands partnering with music artists – the takeaway here is that social listening requires responsiveness, flexibility, and mindfulness when it comes to integrating culture. People want to be heard, not sold to, and efforts should extend offline. This is only achieved through a full understanding of a new age of partnerships – one where brands have a bigger role to play in artist’s lives and artists are crossing the threshold to become true digital marketers monetizing the whole self.

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The post How YouTube is Supporting Black Creators and Artists appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2021/01/how-youtube-is-supporting-black-creators-and-artists/

How Pinterest is Advocating for Underrepresented Communities and Cultural Sensitivity

Earlier this year, in a push to create a more diverse community and deliver unique and hyper-refined results for every person, Pinterest upgraded its skin tone feature launched initially in 2018 and opened it to more regions including the UK, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand. The move was fueled by earlier research that found over half (60%) of the top 100 search terms for skin-related searches on the platform also included a tone.

Today, Pinterest is furthering its commitment to underrepresented users and demonstrating that it understands its users can’t feel inspired if they don’t feel represented. Here’s a breakdown of what the platform has in the works.

A new self-identification tool

Following its recent introduction of Story Pins and curated spaces, Pinterest is committed to ensuring that 50 percent of the managed creators it works with come from underrepresented groups.

“As we continue to build a platform for everyone, it’s important that the ideas Pinners discover and take action on are inclusive of our global community…We’re continuing to make progress on our commitments to support meaningful change—whether it’s increasing the discoverability of diverse ideas to reflect our hundreds of millions of Pinners, using our marketing channels to help drive change or our amplifying creators from all backgrounds and experiences.” the platform shared in the official announcement.

Pinterest further explained that its aim is to have those who self-identify via its upcoming tool see their content in key areas across the platform including the Today tab, Shopping Spotlights and the Pinterest Shop. This will all be centrally managed by retailers, creators, and advertisers through the Community Information tab in the settings menu — but the catch is these must be registered business profiles.

“Make the World See All Beauty” Campaign

As part of this event and in partnership with advertising agency 72andSunny, Pinterest also kicked off its newest campaign “Make the World See All Beauty,” including a social film and V Magazine cover wrap which shines a light on 10 creators pushing the boundaries and driving the conversations surrounding diversity and inclusion. The film highlights some of their personally captured content with the goal of displaying a more representative future — one where the beauty world sees all variations of beauty.

The campaign will go live on Pinterest creator social channels and YouTube in addition to exclusive content in Story Pins. Participating creators include Nyma Tang, Kiitan Akinniranye, Tennille Murphy, Kiitan Akinniranye, and Nam Vo.

Differentiating between appropriation and appreciation

In an effort to use an atypical Halloween and holiday season to drive awareness about cultural sensitivity — Pinterest earlier this month announced that it would implement informational prompts into key searches as people planned their unique celebrations at home.

“Many people may not know that certain costumes are appropriations of other cultures. As a platform for positivity, we want to make it easy to find culturally-appropriate Halloween ideas, and bring awareness to the fact that costumes should not be opportunities to turn a person’s identity into a stereotyped image,” the platform explained.

To help brands and Pinners give additional consideration to the campaign tie-ins and decisions around these celebrations, searches — like for “Day of the Dead costumes” — will now show a Pin at the top of results with information curated by Pinterest employee group PIndigenous and experts such as Dr. Adrienne Keene on how to celebrate thoughtfully and respectfully. Additionally, the platform will limit recommendations for costumes that appropriate cultures.

Whether in the context of Halloween or otherwise, these conversations are integral to advancing as a society and an industry. The Black Lives Matter movement has fundamentally altered the advertising industry and accelerated the need for brands to tackle tough questions head-on including how they define terms including “diversity” and “inclusion” within their own organization but also how that is manifested in their messaging to consumers. With this, they also have an important role to play in understanding the difference between performative action and a real, long-term strategy and commitment to DE&I.

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The post How Pinterest is Advocating for Underrepresented Communities and Cultural Sensitivity appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2020/10/how-pinterest-is-advocating-for-underrepresented-communities-and-cultural-sensitivity/

How Pinterest is Embracing Inclusivity and Video Content

More than ever, people, especially younger demographics are looking to places like Pinterest to be inspired. They want to be represented and find inspiration that directly ties into their passions and primary interests. This has only been exacerbated by the global pandemic in addition to the industry seeing a massive shift towards video consumption and creation.

Here are a few ways Pinterest is doubling down on these trends and taking advantage of the whitespaces presented by COVID-19 to better connect with its audience and deliver meaningful experiences.

Embracing inclusivity and diversity

At the start of the pandemic, Pinterest reported a spike in shopping activity on the platform by nearly half (44%). Shortly after Pinterest launched new features including curated shopping lists from pinned boards, a Shop Similar algorithm, and shoppable style guides. To build on its most popular category, the platform decided to upgrade its skin tone feature launched initially in 2018, and open it to more countries including the UK, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand.

“No one should have to work extra hard to uncover personalized ideas, and all should feel welcome. A more diverse Pinterest is a more useful, positive, and powerful one.” said the company’s Annie Ta in an official statement. Ta also revealed that the app launched skin tone ranges because nearly 60 percent of searches involving “skin” included a specific tone, such as dark, olive, or pale.

Ultimately, with this move, Pinterest is demonstrating that it understands its users can’t feel inspired if they don’t feel represented. Powered by machine vision, the feature is aimed to make it easier to find relevant content specifically by offering searches including “grey hair on dark skin women,” “blonde hair color ideas for fair skin blue eyes,” and “soft natural makeup for Black women“ to deliver unique and hyper-refined results for every person.

Streamlining video pin creation

According to Pinterest data, video views on the platform have increased more than 3x in 2020 over the same period in 2019, while Pinners are also 2.6x more likely to make a purchase after viewing brand video content on the platform.

In response to the uptick in video creation, Pinterest is partnering with Vimeo in an effort to enable Pinners access to the newly launched Vimeo Create platform. By joining forces, users can upload their videos directly to Pinterest and more easily streamline their efforts. Launched in February, Vimeo Create allows brands and marketers to pick from pre-made, professionally curated video templates customizable to their specific needs or start a new video from scratch, integrating their own video footage. After the video is finalized, they can automatically tailor the content for each of their social channels in distinct versions depending on the format and aspect ratios needed: square, vertical, or horizontal.

“Designed for video newbies and experienced editors alike, Vimeo Create is built to help small businesses and scrappy creators craft video ads and social media content that drives engagement and builds brand buy-in, even if you’ve never made a video before. And now, you can seamlessly publish videos you make directly to Pinterest, no downloading or middleman required,” explained Vimeo’s Aubrey Page.

Maximize your Pinterest videos

To kick start your Pinterest video efforts — pocket these five key tips from Vimeo:

  • Ensure your information is fresh and spell out the details in your copy. Get in a DIY mindset to make it engaging and interactive as possible.
  • Brevity is key for maximizing impact and boosting shareability– the ideal Pinterest video length is between 6 and 15 seconds.
  • Be sure your clips are explained with captions and other visuals. Most will tune in with their sound off.
  • Carefully consider your thumbnail. This is the first piece people will see and it needs to be attention-grabbing, highlight your brand, and depict your aesthetic point of view.
  • Don’t overlook the power of prominent branding. Place your brand name as early as possible and leverage titles and descriptions to get this across and let people know where they can find more exciting video content.

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The post How Pinterest is Embracing Inclusivity and Video Content appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2020/08/how-pinterest-is-embracing-inclusivity-and-video-content/

The Strong Link Between Diversity and Innovation: Insights from Salesforce and TBWA/Worldwide

Platforms are transforming to better acknowledge real-life demographics of users across traditional and social platforms. Fifty percent of the US population under 35  are people of color and 50% of the global population are women, after all.

How can we get more action from conversations about diversifying platforms and invite more users to become part of the creative process?

Join SMW Insider to watch this #SMWNYC session

Subscribe

Doug Melville, Chief Diversity Officer of TBWA\Worldwide in North America, sat down with Lola Banjo, Strategy Innovation Executive at Salesforce, during #SMWNYC to talk about the opportunities for women and people of color within a creative and digital space, among other topics.

Here are a few highlights from the conversation.

Diversity is a business imperative

While Melville’s role within diversity at TBWA\Worldwide is significant, he himself began the discussion by saying it is key that a diversity officer not always be in charge of the matter, rather turn to people who know about innovation, like Banjo, to look past an established “recipe” for diversity issues.

“People that are not in the diversity role, talking about diversity is so important because you recognize that it’s not because they’re doing their job. It’s because it is important. Diversity is a business imperative. It’s something that is going to drive real, meaningful change in our world, but it’s also driving real business results,” Banjo agreed.

The message of diversity has to be owned by a given organization or brand and “embedded in the DNA,” Banjo said.

Banjo inclusively went beyond the sentiment of variety and included research that can attest to the importance of diversity within a business, citing that companies which are gender diverse are 15% more likely to outperform. Companies that are ethnically diverse are 35% more likely to outperform. It is an undeniable win-win for all.

Innovation without inclusion fails its consumers

When testing for an audience, Banjo says she strives to find a person that is very different from herself, or her team.

“[We] dig into how we can solve for this persona that’s different,” she said, adding that it could be a middle-aged disabled woman who could most benefit from a given product if it is designed with her in mind.

Need a bigger example?

Banjo talked about a research study out of the University of Virginia which showed that women were more likely to be injured in car accidents because the crash-test dummies that product designers used were shaped as males. “I think the statistic was around 71% chance of [women] being moderately injured in an accident,” she said.

Opportunity through diverse thinking

Any medium of communication serves as a voice and is a way to connect with others, Banjo reminded people. But consumers are the ones who pick what thought patterns or conversations they want to be a part of.

Within social media, for instance, consumers can more quickly voice their takes or concerns to a company as opposed to before, when they needed to utilize snail mail or find a way to phone the headquarters.

“You can go on Twitter connect directly with a brand, you can connect with the people that are influencing that thought at the organization. It’s forcing companies to think differently as well, to think about the fact that if they do something unnecessarily wrong, it can travel through social media within a day,” she said.

Thus, the focus on diversity can make or break a brand, quickly.

Diversity just is

Banjo’s goal is to emphasize that brand and product design should not be limited to itself, but should instead consider how it will design a better world. Yet, ultimately, she hopes there will be no need for an extensive talk on diversity.

“I’m looking forward to a future where we don’t have to have a diversity conversation anymore. Where we are doing it because it just is,” she said, versus having to strategize on how to include different people.

Join 100,000+ fellow marketers who advance their skills and knowledge by subscribing to our weekly newsletter.

WATCH OUR SMWLA 2019 PROMO

The post The Strong Link Between Diversity and Innovation: Insights from Salesforce and TBWA/Worldwide appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/05/the-strong-link-between-diversity-and-innovation-insights-from-salesforce-and-tbwa-worldwide/

The Strong Link Between Diversity and Innovation: Insights from Salesforce and TBWA/Worldwide

Platforms are transforming to better acknowledge real-life demographics of users across traditional and social platforms. Fifty percent of the US population under 35  are people of color and 50% of the global population are women, after all.

How can we get more action from conversations about diversifying platforms and invite more users to become part of the creative process?

Join SMW Insider to watch this #SMWNYC session

Subscribe

Doug Melville, Chief Diversity Officer of TBWA\Worldwide in North America, sat down with Lola Banjo, Strategy Innovation Executive at Salesforce, during #SMWNYC to talk about the opportunities for women and people of color within a creative and digital space, among other topics.

Here are a few highlights from the conversation.

Diversity is a business imperative

While Melville’s role within diversity at TBWA\Worldwide is significant, he himself began the discussion by saying it is key that a diversity officer not always be in charge of the matter, rather turn to people who know about innovation, like Banjo, to look past an established “recipe” for diversity issues.

“People that are not in the diversity role, talking about diversity is so important because you recognize that it’s not because they’re doing their job. It’s because it is important. Diversity is a business imperative. It’s something that is going to drive real, meaningful change in our world, but it’s also driving real business results,” Banjo agreed.

The message of diversity has to be owned by a given organization or brand and “embedded in the DNA,” Banjo said.

Banjo inclusively went beyond the sentiment of variety and included research that can attest to the importance of diversity within a business, citing that companies which are gender diverse are 15% more likely to outperform. Companies that are ethnically diverse are 35% more likely to outperform. It is an undeniable win-win for all.

Innovation without inclusion fails its consumers

When testing for an audience, Banjo says she strives to find a person that is very different from herself, or her team.

“[We] dig into how we can solve for this persona that’s different,” she said, adding that it could be a middle-aged disabled woman who could most benefit from a given product if it is designed with her in mind.

Need a bigger example?

Banjo talked about a research study out of the University of Virginia which showed that women were more likely to be injured in car accidents because the crash-test dummies that product designers used were shaped as males. “I think the statistic was around 71% chance of [women] being moderately injured in an accident,” she said.

Opportunity through diverse thinking

Any medium of communication serves as a voice and is a way to connect with others, Banjo reminded people. But consumers are the ones who pick what thought patterns or conversations they want to be a part of.

Within social media, for instance, consumers can more quickly voice their takes or concerns to a company as opposed to before, when they needed to utilize snail mail or find a way to phone the headquarters.

“You can go on Twitter connect directly with a brand, you can connect with the people that are influencing that thought at the organization. It’s forcing companies to think differently as well, to think about the fact that if they do something unnecessarily wrong, it can travel through social media within a day,” she said.

Thus, the focus on diversity can make or break a brand, quickly.

Diversity just is

Banjo’s goal is to emphasize that brand and product design should not be limited to itself, but should instead consider how it will design a better world. Yet, ultimately, she hopes there will be no need for an extensive talk on diversity.

“I’m looking forward to a future where we don’t have to have a diversity conversation anymore. Where we are doing it because it just is,” she said, versus having to strategize on how to include different people.

Join 100,000+ fellow marketers who advance their skills and knowledge by subscribing to our weekly newsletter.

WATCH OUR SMWLA 2019 PROMO

The post The Strong Link Between Diversity and Innovation: Insights from Salesforce and TBWA/Worldwide appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/05/the-strong-link-between-diversity-and-innovation-insights-from-salesforce-and-tbwa-worldwide/

The Strong Link Between Diversity and Innovation: Insights from Salesforce and TBWA/Worldwide

Platforms are transforming to better acknowledge real-life demographics of users across traditional and social platforms. Fifty percent of the US population under 35  are people of color and 50% of the global population are women, after all.

How can we get more action from conversations about diversifying platforms and invite more users to become part of the creative process?

Join SMW Insider to watch this #SMWNYC session

Subscribe

Doug Melville, Chief Diversity Officer of TBWA\Worldwide in North America, sat down with Lola Banjo, Strategy Innovation Executive at Salesforce, during #SMWNYC to talk about the opportunities for women and people of color within a creative and digital space, among other topics.

Here are a few highlights from the conversation.

Diversity is a business imperative

While Melville’s role within diversity at TBWA\Worldwide is significant, he himself began the discussion by saying it is key that a diversity officer not always be in charge of the matter, rather turn to people who know about innovation, like Banjo, to look past an established “recipe” for diversity issues.

“People that are not in the diversity role, talking about diversity is so important because you recognize that it’s not because they’re doing their job. It’s because it is important. Diversity is a business imperative. It’s something that is going to drive real, meaningful change in our world, but it’s also driving real business results,” Banjo agreed.

The message of diversity has to be owned by a given organization or brand and “embedded in the DNA,” Banjo said.

Banjo inclusively went beyond the sentiment of variety and included research that can attest to the importance of diversity within a business, citing that companies which are gender diverse are 15% more likely to outperform. Companies that are ethnically diverse are 35% more likely to outperform. It is an undeniable win-win for all.

Innovation without inclusion fails its consumers

When testing for an audience, Banjo says she strives to find a person that is very different from herself, or her team.

“[We] dig into how we can solve for this persona that’s different,” she said, adding that it could be a middle-aged disabled woman who could most benefit from a given product if it is designed with her in mind.

Need a bigger example?

Banjo talked about a research study out of the University of Virginia which showed that women were more likely to be injured in car accidents because the crash-test dummies that product designers used were shaped as males. “I think the statistic was around 71% chance of [women] being moderately injured in an accident,” she said.

Opportunity through diverse thinking

Any medium of communication serves as a voice and is a way to connect with others, Banjo reminded people. But consumers are the ones who pick what thought patterns or conversations they want to be a part of.

Within social media, for instance, consumers can more quickly voice their takes or concerns to a company as opposed to before, when they needed to utilize snail mail or find a way to phone the headquarters.

“You can go on Twitter connect directly with a brand, you can connect with the people that are influencing that thought at the organization. It’s forcing companies to think differently as well, to think about the fact that if they do something unnecessarily wrong, it can travel through social media within a day,” she said.

Thus, the focus on diversity can make or break a brand, quickly.

Diversity just is

Banjo’s goal is to emphasize that brand and product design should not be limited to itself, but should instead consider how it will design a better world. Yet, ultimately, she hopes there will be no need for an extensive talk on diversity.

“I’m looking forward to a future where we don’t have to have a diversity conversation anymore. Where we are doing it because it just is,” she said, versus having to strategize on how to include different people.

Join 100,000+ fellow marketers who advance their skills and knowledge by subscribing to our weekly newsletter.

WATCH OUR SMWLA 2019 PROMO

The post The Strong Link Between Diversity and Innovation: Insights from Salesforce and TBWA/Worldwide appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/05/the-strong-link-between-diversity-and-innovation-insights-from-salesforce-and-tbwa-worldwide/

The Strong Link Between Diversity and Innovation: Insights from Salesforce and TBWA/Worldwide

Platforms are transforming to better acknowledge real-life demographics of users across traditional and social platforms. Fifty percent of the US population under 35  are people of color and 50% of the global population are women, after all.

How can we get more action from conversations about diversifying platforms and invite more users to become part of the creative process?

Join SMW Insider to watch this #SMWNYC session

Subscribe

Doug Melville, Chief Diversity Officer of TBWA\Worldwide in North America, sat down with Lola Banjo, Strategy Innovation Executive at Salesforce, during #SMWNYC to talk about the opportunities for women and people of color within a creative and digital space, among other topics.

Here are a few highlights from the conversation.

Diversity is a business imperative

While Melville’s role within diversity at TBWA\Worldwide is significant, he himself began the discussion by saying it is key that a diversity officer not always be in charge of the matter, rather turn to people who know about innovation, like Banjo, to look past an established “recipe” for diversity issues.

“People that are not in the diversity role, talking about diversity is so important because you recognize that it’s not because they’re doing their job. It’s because it is important. Diversity is a business imperative. It’s something that is going to drive real, meaningful change in our world, but it’s also driving real business results,” Banjo agreed.

The message of diversity has to be owned by a given organization or brand and “embedded in the DNA,” Banjo said.

Banjo inclusively went beyond the sentiment of variety and included research that can attest to the importance of diversity within a business, citing that companies which are gender diverse are 15% more likely to outperform. Companies that are ethnically diverse are 35% more likely to outperform. It is an undeniable win-win for all.

Innovation without inclusion fails its consumers

When testing for an audience, Banjo says she strives to find a person that is very different from herself, or her team.

“[We] dig into how we can solve for this persona that’s different,” she said, adding that it could be a middle-aged disabled woman who could most benefit from a given product if it is designed with her in mind.

Need a bigger example?

Banjo talked about a research study out of the University of Virginia which showed that women were more likely to be injured in car accidents because the crash-test dummies that product designers used were shaped as males. “I think the statistic was around 71% chance of [women] being moderately injured in an accident,” she said.

Opportunity through diverse thinking

Any medium of communication serves as a voice and is a way to connect with others, Banjo reminded people. But consumers are the ones who pick what thought patterns or conversations they want to be a part of.

Within social media, for instance, consumers can more quickly voice their takes or concerns to a company as opposed to before, when they needed to utilize snail mail or find a way to phone the headquarters.

“You can go on Twitter connect directly with a brand, you can connect with the people that are influencing that thought at the organization. It’s forcing companies to think differently as well, to think about the fact that if they do something unnecessarily wrong, it can travel through social media within a day,” she said.

Thus, the focus on diversity can make or break a brand, quickly.

Diversity just is

Banjo’s goal is to emphasize that brand and product design should not be limited to itself, but should instead consider how it will design a better world. Yet, ultimately, she hopes there will be no need for an extensive talk on diversity.

“I’m looking forward to a future where we don’t have to have a diversity conversation anymore. Where we are doing it because it just is,” she said, versus having to strategize on how to include different people.

Join 100,000+ fellow marketers who advance their skills and knowledge by subscribing to our weekly newsletter.

WATCH OUR SMWLA 2019 PROMO

The post The Strong Link Between Diversity and Innovation: Insights from Salesforce and TBWA/Worldwide appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/05/the-strong-link-between-diversity-and-innovation-insights-from-salesforce-and-tbwa-worldwide/

Imagining Prejudice-Free Platforms with June Sarpong MBE

We are all a product of conditioning, and it’s not the standard Tresemme. Society has presents when it comes to social order, standards and outlooks and it’s hard to see past them when we’re saturated with them in the form of archetypes, stereotypes and new stories expressing blatant intolerance.

Everyone has an unconscious bias. For June Sarpong MBE, it was whilst she was filming in Las Vegas that she discovered hers. Having grown up in Walthamstow where diversity was second nature, she found herself nerved on set in an unfamiliar country by an unfamiliar man with tattoos. This prompted her to wonder: “how much are we losing as a society to the way that we’ve all been conditioned?”

At Social Media Week London 2018, June sat down with Founder and Executive Director of SMW, Toby Daniels for a conversation about navigating social media without prejudice.

We’re Living on Isolation Station

With help from Oxford University, Sarpong discovered that, in the UK, only one in ten people have a best friend of a different background and a third of Brits don’t have any friends from that at all.

Social media allows you to connect with people we wouldn’t normally, but on the flipside is that it can probe isolation. Sarpong recommends following at least ten people you wouldn’t normally interact with online, in order to make a start on diversifying your feed and acknowledging flipside views. The first step is to acknowledge your bias, then act on it by mastering tolerance, which is the gateway to acceptance.

The Moral Argument vs Social vs Economic

Living without prejudice is morally the right thing to do which is why we feel comfortable talking about it, and the social argument makes for a richer society. However, Sarpong explained how those arguments to date hadn’t enforced a change and used this as reasoning as to why the UK has moved on to the economic argument. Companies with more diversity are able to improve their profits, access more insight and expand, so it’s economically smart. In demand, younger talent like Generation Z are climatized to diversity as it’s like night and day for them, so are likely to be attracted to companies championing it.

We Need a Shift in the Tech-tonic Plates

Sarpong spoke of how the tech industry has been and continues to be the hardest and slowest to make a change in terms of diversity because “it’s still in its relatively embryonic stages.” For example, Steve is essentially hiring another Steve. Perhaps if the minority were able to access Silicon Valley, we’d be able to work from the bottom up?

It’s possible for everyone to start addressing their unconscious bias today. “Go back to your team and look at everyone in the room,” Sarpong advised. “If they’re not [diverse], diversify when you can.”

Outside the workplace, she encouraged speaking to neighbors and sponsoring others – actions with trickle effects. It’s clear it’s possible to use social media without prejudice, and it’s possible to live, too.

Learn the latest trends, insights and best practices from the brightest minds in media and technology. Sign up for SMW Insider to watch full-length sessions from official Social Media Week conferences live and on-demand.

The post Imagining Prejudice-Free Platforms with June Sarpong MBE appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2018/11/imagining-prejudice-free-platforms-with-june-sarpong-mbe/

What the Tech Summit Needs to Accomplish

A bevy of technology executives are meeting with President-elect Trump today, the first in what’s likely to be a long and awkward relationship with the man who both uses their platforms and derides them at every turn. Alphabet CEO Larry Page, Apple CEO Tim Cook, Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg, Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella, and SpaceX…

http://fortune.com/2016/12/14/what-the-tech-summit-needs-to-accomplish/

How a Diverse Twitter Network Will Help You Get Ahead at Work

Interesting research shows that all the time you’re spending on Twitter may not be a complete waste – but only if you’ve cultivated a truly diverse network of people to follow. Three researchers, Salvatore Parise, from Babson College in Massachusetts, Eoin Whelan from the J.E. Cairnes School of Business & Economics at the National University…

http://fortune.com/2016/08/16/diverse-twitter-network-career-tips/