Tag: content

CHEESE SUBMARINES. Brexit and Social Media: A Marriage Made in Hull

Two years ago a columnist from The Times, Hugo Rifkind, came up with a spot-on analogy on Twitter, comparing the Brexit mess to a cheese submarine.

The 12-part thread explained how the government promised to build a great cheese submarine, even though all long, they knew it was doomed to fail. The tweets quickly achieved viral status not only for the comedic relief it afforded the situation but its ability to explain it in simpler terms that people could relate to and engage with.

View the full #SMWLDN agenda

With little more than a month to go until the UK’s second scheduled departure date from the EU, the path ahead remains uncertain. What might happen come October 31? Despite efforts of parliament will a no-deal Brexit happen anyway? These are still lingering questions, but one thing has been clear: brands can learn a lot more from all of the confusion beyond how to make impossible promises.

During the final session of #SMWLDN, join David Schneider, Creative Director at That Lot, for a lively conversation unpacking the best and worst of Brexit-related social media and key insights for nailing your satirical writing and video content. Finally, engage with fellow audience members in an end-of-term quiz that will answer the burning question: just how irritated has Brexit made everyone?

There’s still time to join David and many more speakers in London at Westminster’s QEII Centre this fall (31 Oct – 1 Nov), – so act fast, and look toward a future of satirical storytelling with us!

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WATCH THE SMWLDN 2019 PROMO

The post CHEESE SUBMARINES. Brexit and Social Media: A Marriage Made in Hull appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/10/cheese-submarines-brexit-and-social-media-a-marriage-made-in-hull/

Brave Browser Wants to “Tip” Strong Tweeters, Redditors, and More

We’re now conditioned to expect recognition online for content people enjoy: likes, favorites, hearts, claps, and the like. But Brave, the privacy-oriented browser from Mozilla’s former CEO, wants to do you one better, and is building out a tipping system for content to achieve it.

The latest release of the browser (available now for Windows, MacOS, and Linux) includes a tipping system for Twitter; the interface has been modified to include a “tip” icon, where users can literally reward tweets that make them laugh, think, or learn. In turn, users who like your tweets can tip you. And the tipping mechanism is coming to three other platforms: Reddit discussion forums, programming site GitHub, and video platform Vimeo. While oft-called “vanity metrics” can sometimes provide a sense of connection, Brave CEO Brendan Eich believes tipping is a stronger and more substantive means “to connect users directly to their favorite creators.”

Brave joins an ecosystem that allows creators to make money from the content they produce. But it is among the smallest means to do so, and could prove attractive to small-scale makers who don’t produce on a level appropriate for Patreon, Facebook, YouTube, or Snapchat’s creator programs. Writes CNET about the development, “It’s all a significant change in the way web publishers have historically financed themselves.” And for a browser that prides itself on honoring privacy and offering shelter from an Internet built to mine fodder for ad revenue, it feels like a thoughtful next step.

Tipping takes place with a cryptocurrency-like unit called a “basic attention token,” or BAT. To tip a tweeter, you can click the “tip” link that will show up in the Brave browser. From there, you can choose to tip 1, 5, or 10 BAT for the content. You also have the option of making the tip a one-time payment, or setting up a monthly contribution. Tips can be converted into regular currency through Brave partner Uphold.

And while a small number of users are taking advantage of this program (about 60,000 as of August 2019), the rate of growth is climbing steadily. And why shouldn’t it? As concerns about content theft and free labor online grow, the prospect of being rewarded, even in small measure, for the things we post online each day is attractive. And particularly for creators who aren’t seeking to build empires with their content, the small thanks that a tip affords goes a long way for rewarding their time and energy.

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WATCH THE SMWLDN 2019 PROMO

The post Brave Browser Wants to “Tip” Strong Tweeters, Redditors, and More appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/08/brave-browser-wants-to-tip-strong-tweeters-redditors-and-more/

Is Your Brand’s Social Media Strategy Anti-Social?

How do you define your brand’s social media strategy? Do the words “community” or “conversation” come to mind? If they aren’t immediately a part of your answer, it might be time to reevaluate.

This year, LUSH Cosmetics UK announced their move from multiple social handles to a single brand hashtag, #LUSHCommunity. This news quickly became a topic of office conversation. How would LUSH contact their audiences? How would they share updates? Make announcements?

But then, we stopped. We took a second look.

Traditionally, brands have treated social media as a megaphone. But, by using social media as just another tool to expand reach, brands overlook the reason that social media exists in the first place: to cultivate a community for conversation.

For brands, social media should be a starting point. Brands need to remember that social media is a shared space, and for consumers, its value isn’t monetary. It’s the social currency users gain when they engage with each other that matters more.

If the people using social media care more about content, conversation and clout than they do about click-through rates, then brands should care more about those elements as well.

So, what if we started treating brands on social media as communities?

What if we decentralized the brand’s social media presence to let its community curate its story?

Would we cultivate more human connections?

Building customer content into the brand’s social media strategy

Sabine Schwirtz, Community Manager at LUSH Cosmetics North America, discusses a shift in brand identity. She states, “I think many marketers who have been in the industry for a long time are worried about maintaining the voice of the brand. But, the voice of the brand is not always the same as the voice of the customers. We’re moving closer to times where a brand’s identity is the same as their customers’ identity.”

And, Stephanie Buscemi, CMO at Salesforce, recently reiterated that sentiment. She states, “In the future, the content won’t come from the brands. It will come from the communities.”

LUSH has simply given customers a place to discuss, ask questions and interact with each other. The community becomes a place for customers to lean into their passion for the brand and its products.

It’s a disruptive decision. There’s no denying that releasing control of your brand’s narrative in this way is a risk. But, it’s undoubtedly a trend. If you’re too nervous to let your customers take some control of the conversation, it’s possible that you actually don’t know them as well as you think.

Shifting from social listening to social understanding

When a brand shifts from driving the conversation to letting customers take the wheel, the brand’s social media strategy moves from communication to collaboration. In doing so, the brand moves from social listening to social understanding.

Social media isn’t the only place where a marked shift to understanding is happening. Up and coming technologies, like voice search, artificial intelligence and voice robots also require a deeper level of understanding to be effective. It’s a trait that has always differentiated the computer from the human. A computer can listen to provide output, but a human can understand to provide input.

By cultivating community, brands can listen and contribute, but more importantly, they can understand. They can act accordingly.

Creating a community-driven roadmap

When brands better understand customer needs, they can shape their R&D and product roadmaps to solve for those pain points. That level of personalization nurtures loyal customers that in turn organically advocate for your brand.

When a brand’s social media strategy focuses on community, brands acknowledge customers as content creators. This shift replaces a brand’s inauthentic social presence with a content strategy driven by real, lasting relationships.

By recognizing social media as a gateway, brands tap into the world of possibilities that the user-generated content created there provides — and the immense amount of value it adds to brand identity.

The post Is Your Brand’s Social Media Strategy Anti-Social? appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/08/is-your-brands-social-media-strategy-anti-social/

What’s the Key to Keeping it Real? Treat Your Customers Relationships like Friendships, says ELA Advertising

It’s no secret that in today’s digital landscape social media carries tremendous storytelling power. What this means for brands and agencies is wielding a critical responsibility to influence how people think and act in an environment inundated with noise. It’s no small feat, but it’s now more important than ever to identify opportunities to develop truly authentic and meaningful content worthy of our time and attention.

During #SMWLA, Andre Filip, CEO & Founder, ELA Advertising, Max Brabant, Agent, Digital Talent and Packaging, CAA and Jesse Margolis, Founder, Overheard came together to offer their unique perspectives on this topic.

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Keeping it real & ensuring strategic alignment

“Alignment is so critical when it comes to messaging on social media,” said Filip when discussing the creation of authentic content.

Originally, the old model, for agencies in particular, was to view the consumer and their life in a straight path, and to sell directly to them based on their ethos or way of living. This approach, however, has become antiquated and no longer relevant.

“Our new model, on the brand side, is to start understanding and speaking their stories and find similarities and that parallel gap is where social falls in and we have this rhythmic balance of messaging,” he added. “It’s like starting a friendship.”

Weighing on how authenticity between a brand and a celebrity or influencer can do a better job of keeping it real, Brabant explained, that a more holistic approach and identifying overlaps with core values is important. “More often brands approach us for one-off social posts and it isn’t appealing to us as reps. It does very little for our clients. We look to long-term organic partnerships that are more authentic to them and to their audience.”

For OverheardLA, staying true to the idea that you can’t fake being real is an integral part of who they are. To achieve this, posts are purposely unpolished so that they feel raw and more relatable. “We figure out how to monetize without destroying the thing,” Margolis said.

Ultimately, there is a fundamental responsibility on both sides. On the one hand, a brand has to ask itself, does this person truly match us. On the other hand, influencers must also ask themselves, does this brand map to the kind of person I am and my personality?

Choose influencers for their talent, not their followers

On the topic of discerning how to determine what brands to partner with based on your personal brand and why, Andre turned to a recent April Fools campaign ELA completed in partnership with Tik Tok and DJ Khaled. Not only was it critical to understand Tik Tok’s brand values and what they stood for, but selecting the one person that would exemplify this overall spirit.

“It was important that we let Khaled be Khaled. If we would’ve given him a script, he would’ve felt very closed off,” Filip added, underscoring the relationship worked because he was provided loose direction and allowed to express himself how he wished as opposed to feeling as though he had to fit into a certain box.

Leveraging her own experiences, Brabant reiterated the idea that micromanaging is typically not favored by clients and in most cases, results in CAA offering an ultimatum. “There have been cases where we’ve closed a deal and whoever is on the other side has come to us and said, ‘we need it to look exactly like this,’ and I’ve had to go back and tell them that they can either deal with it or if it’s a deal breaker then let’s just not do this partnership.”

Awareness will lead to acquisition, but it’s the long-game that paves the way to a more meaningful, sustainable story to share with your audience. It boils down to patience and long-term commitment to assess each and every part of the communication funnel to identify moments of relevance where you can say, “We are like you and we live like you and think like you.”

Using tone of voice as a filter

Tone of voice is hyper-critical to the success of a brand not getting ‘heckled’ and ensuring the alignment sought after between brands and audiences yet this often gets convoluted when a brand and influencer have two different ways of communicating.

“How you combine this is art and we need to make sure we do that,” stressed Filip.

When discussing OverheardLA’s tone of voice, Margolis used the phrase “elevated curation.” 80 to 90 percent of their social posts are real overheard quotes that are submitted, with very few being written by the team.

“We are a brand of words and nothing we do should not be expressed with the written word,” he added. However, there are guardrails in place that determine which content is allowed or not. No religion, no politics, and no gossip for example.

It’s easy to decide there are no rules or there are rules but once you make these decisions you should stick with them, Margolis emphasized. The same applies to brands — those who have the most success know what they want and have certain red lines they’d prefer not to be crossed but then give the agency freedom to do the translating.

The alternative? Your audience will likely pick up that the message has been heavily filtered. “As much as people are okay with you monetizing, they aren’t ok with scrolling to something that has been sold out or taken over.”

Going beyond social

Born social-first, recently Overheard has stepped outside of the confines of Instagram to build its recognition through the launch of a free print newspaper called the Overheard Post. The paper includes horoscopes, comics, vegan food reviews, and is currently available at roughly 30 cafes and coffee shops throughout Los Angeles.

Serving as a physical manifestation of the social culture Overheard has built, Jesse described the paper as a business card that depicts “who we are and what we can do beyond posts and Stories…The fact that we have social allows us to play in new spaces with our content,” said  Margolis. He then rallied off examples spanning ad campaigns, billboards, merch, and coffee sleeves.

The key takeaway – by being disruptive outside of the platform, you can identify more opportunities to translate into other areas that ironically will feed back into your platform’s growth.

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WATCH OUR SMWLDN 2019 PROMO

The post What’s the Key to Keeping it Real? Treat Your Customers Relationships like Friendships, says ELA Advertising appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/06/whats-the-key-to-keeping-it-real-treat-your-customers-relationships-like-friendships-says-ela-advertising/

NBCUniversal’s Key Tip For Thumb-Stopping Content: Employ the 6 Second Rule

Back in the day, TV and radio adverts were sixty seconds long. That was when we had to watch what was put in front of us. Now, with the power to choose exactly what we see and when we see it, it’s a nearly impossible task to get someone to focus on your product. Nearly.

According to researchers, the average human attention span is eight seconds. Apparently, that’s four seconds less than twenty years ago. It’s also, supposedly, one second less than that of a goldfish.

Join SMW Insider to watch this #SMWNYC session

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We live in an age where everybody is trying to get noticed. Whether it’s companies advertising their brand, bands trying to sell their music or the average person trying to go viral with a tweet or a YouTube video, the odds of success are longer than ever before. Coupled with our distinct lack of bother for anything that doesn’t immediately catch our eye, it’s been calculated that an advert, a trailer or a social post has six seconds – if not significantly less – to catch our attention.

‘Thumb-stopping content” is how it’s referred to by Megan Toth, Senior Social Media Lead at NBCUniversal. Just how, when people are always skipping on to the next song, to the next post, to the next message – do we get someone to stop? At the helm of one of the biggest television production companies in the world, she’s got a big job on her hands – here’s how she claims to do it.

Make it a meme

The sharing power of the internet is much like human instinct. The growth of any brand, musician or company relies on one important communication tool – word of mouth. when people like something, they want to tell their friends.

Megan agrees that one of the most important factors in keeping someone’s attention – and making them remember you – is making them laugh. She used HBO’s Instagram account as an example – with posts that marry popular internet memes with clips and shots from famous shows. It’s a promotion tool.

‘If you make them laugh, they’ll remember you.’

Similarly, the LA Art House’s Instagram account brings art, something that perhaps exceeds some people’s understanding, down to a personal level. People are way more likely to take a chance on something if they know what’s going on and understand it. Memes are the 21st century’s way of doing that.

Switch it up

‘Don’t post the same things on every platform,’ says Megan, as one of her biggest bugbears about brand content. Some brands will get one hundred thousand likes on Instagram, and post the same thing on Facebook, which doesn’t match their platform style or feed in the same way – and get 100. It drives followers away. They don’t need to see things twice.

Make it look nice

Refinery29 has branched out in recent years to become more than just a digital magazine. Their Instagram account is run by professionals with the know-how and experience to make a cracking feed.

Colour is always positive: bright, eye-catching and mood-enhancing. Karson Cressley allegedly has a pink bathroom to wake him up and make him feel better in the morning as supposedly, pink improves serotonin levels.

It may sound obvious, but painting a pretty picture is also a stonewall way to build a brand. It’s the way NatGeo, the ‘Holy Grail’ of social media content, amassed their mega 350m follower count across platforms. They give the account credentials to the photographers, who are trekking through the wild to capture the shots of leopards and dolphins and hyenas: the people who know the photograph best.

Make it snappy

Perhaps the most important aspect of it all in the digital era is selling your content in as minimal a time scale as possible.

Megan used a quote to describe how critical it is to make your image or video as bold as possible when people are always swiping right or scrolling down.’ The scarcest commodity of the 21st century is our attention,’ she says. ‘The attention economy is a cruel mistress and takes no prisoners. Get their attention in six seconds or not at all.’

‘It’s probably less than that,’ she added. It sounds harsh, but it’s true.

GIFS are a goldmine in a six-second world. Short form video content, as GIFS are, on a loop, is worth 1000 words. Megan referenced a study by global orange juice brand Tropicana, where they measured traffic from minute-long, 45, 30, 15 and 6 seconds adverts. The most successful? Take a guess.

Six-second ads on TV are booming and are a win-win for brands. They cost less time and money to make and air.

She ended the session with the following piece of storytelling advice: ‘Think of your story like a joke – distill it down to the punchline.’ There’s no place for timewasters in a window-shopping society.

Join 100,000+ fellow marketers who advance their skills and knowledge by subscribing to our weekly newsletter.

WATCH OUR SMWLA 2019 PROMO

The post NBCUniversal’s Key Tip For Thumb-Stopping Content: Employ the 6 Second Rule appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/05/nbcuniversals-key-tip-for-thumb-stopping-content-employ-the-6-second-rule/

NBCUniversal’s Key Tip For Thumb-Stopping Content: Employ the 6 Second Rule

Back in the day, TV and radio adverts were sixty seconds long. That was when we had to watch what was put in front of us. Now, with the power to choose exactly what we see and when we see it, it’s a nearly impossible task to get someone to focus on your product. Nearly.

According to researchers, the average human attention span is eight seconds. Apparently, that’s four seconds less than twenty years ago. It’s also, supposedly, one second less than that of a goldfish.

Join SMW Insider to watch this #SMWNYC session

Subscribe

We live in an age where everybody is trying to get noticed. Whether it’s companies advertising their brand, bands trying to sell their music or the average person trying to go viral with a tweet or a YouTube video, the odds of success are longer than ever before. Coupled with our distinct lack of bother for anything that doesn’t immediately catch our eye, it’s been calculated that an advert, a trailer or a social post has six seconds – if not significantly less – to catch our attention.

‘Thumb-stopping content” is how it’s referred to by Megan Toth, Senior Social Media Lead at NBCUniversal. Just how, when people are always skipping on to the next song, to the next post, to the next message – do we get someone to stop? At the helm of one of the biggest television production companies in the world, she’s got a big job on her hands – here’s how she claims to do it.

Make it a meme

The sharing power of the internet is much like human instinct. The growth of any brand, musician or company relies on one important communication tool – word of mouth. when people like something, they want to tell their friends.

Megan agrees that one of the most important factors in keeping someone’s attention – and making them remember you – is making them laugh. She used HBO’s Instagram account as an example – with posts that marry popular internet memes with clips and shots from famous shows. It’s a promotion tool.

‘If you make them laugh, they’ll remember you.’

Similarly, the LA Art House’s Instagram account brings art, something that perhaps exceeds some people’s understanding, down to a personal level. People are way more likely to take a chance on something if they know what’s going on and understand it. Memes are the 21st century’s way of doing that.

Switch it up

‘Don’t post the same things on every platform,’ says Megan, as one of her biggest bugbears about brand content. Some brands will get one hundred thousand likes on Instagram, and post the same thing on Facebook, which doesn’t match their platform style or feed in the same way – and get 100. It drives followers away. They don’t need to see things twice.

Make it look nice

Refinery29 has branched out in recent years to become more than just a digital magazine. Their Instagram account is run by professionals with the know-how and experience to make a cracking feed.

Colour is always positive: bright, eye-catching and mood-enhancing. Karson Cressley allegedly has a pink bathroom to wake him up and make him feel better in the morning as supposedly, pink improves serotonin levels.

It may sound obvious, but painting a pretty picture is also a stonewall way to build a brand. It’s the way NatGeo, the ‘Holy Grail’ of social media content, amassed their mega 350m follower count across platforms. They give the account credentials to the photographers, who are trekking through the wild to capture the shots of leopards and dolphins and hyenas: the people who know the photograph best.

Make it snappy

Perhaps the most important aspect of it all in the digital era is selling your content in as minimal a time scale as possible.

Megan used a quote to describe how critical it is to make your image or video as bold as possible when people are always swiping right or scrolling down.’ The scarcest commodity of the 21st century is our attention,’ she says. ‘The attention economy is a cruel mistress and takes no prisoners. Get their attention in six seconds or not at all.’

‘It’s probably less than that,’ she added. It sounds harsh, but it’s true.

GIFS are a goldmine in a six-second world. Short form video content, as GIFS are, on a loop, is worth 1000 words. Megan referenced a study by global orange juice brand Tropicana, where they measured traffic from minute-long, 45, 30, 15 and 6 seconds adverts. The most successful? Take a guess.

Six-second ads on TV are booming and are a win-win for brands. They cost less time and money to make and air.

She ended the session with the following piece of storytelling advice: ‘Think of your story like a joke – distill it down to the punchline.’ There’s no place for timewasters in a window-shopping society.

Join 100,000+ fellow marketers who advance their skills and knowledge by subscribing to our weekly newsletter.

WATCH OUR SMWLA 2019 PROMO

The post NBCUniversal’s Key Tip For Thumb-Stopping Content: Employ the 6 Second Rule appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/05/nbcuniversals-key-tip-for-thumb-stopping-content-employ-the-6-second-rule/

NBCUniversal’s Key Tip For Thumb-Stopping Content: Employ the 6 Second Rule

Back in the day, TV and radio adverts were sixty seconds long. That was when we had to watch what was put in front of us. Now, with the power to choose exactly what we see and when we see it, it’s a nearly impossible task to get someone to focus on your product. Nearly.

According to researchers, the average human attention span is eight seconds. Apparently, that’s four seconds less than twenty years ago. It’s also, supposedly, one second less than that of a goldfish.

Join SMW Insider to watch this #SMWNYC session

Subscribe

We live in an age where everybody is trying to get noticed. Whether it’s companies advertising their brand, bands trying to sell their music or the average person trying to go viral with a tweet or a YouTube video, the odds of success are longer than ever before. Coupled with our distinct lack of bother for anything that doesn’t immediately catch our eye, it’s been calculated that an advert, a trailer or a social post has six seconds – if not significantly less – to catch our attention.

‘Thumb-stopping content” is how it’s referred to by Megan Toth, Senior Social Media Lead at NBCUniversal. Just how, when people are always skipping on to the next song, to the next post, to the next message – do we get someone to stop? At the helm of one of the biggest television production companies in the world, she’s got a big job on her hands – here’s how she claims to do it.

Make it a meme

The sharing power of the internet is much like human instinct. The growth of any brand, musician or company relies on one important communication tool – word of mouth. when people like something, they want to tell their friends.

Megan agrees that one of the most important factors in keeping someone’s attention – and making them remember you – is making them laugh. She used HBO’s Instagram account as an example – with posts that marry popular internet memes with clips and shots from famous shows. It’s a promotion tool.

‘If you make them laugh, they’ll remember you.’

Similarly, the LA Art House’s Instagram account brings art, something that perhaps exceeds some people’s understanding, down to a personal level. People are way more likely to take a chance on something if they know what’s going on and understand it. Memes are the 21st century’s way of doing that.

Switch it up

‘Don’t post the same things on every platform,’ says Megan, as one of her biggest bugbears about brand content. Some brands will get one hundred thousand likes on Instagram, and post the same thing on Facebook, which doesn’t match their platform style or feed in the same way – and get 100. It drives followers away. They don’t need to see things twice.

Make it look nice

Refinery29 has branched out in recent years to become more than just a digital magazine. Their Instagram account is run by professionals with the know-how and experience to make a cracking feed.

Colour is always positive: bright, eye-catching and mood-enhancing. Karson Cressley allegedly has a pink bathroom to wake him up and make him feel better in the morning as supposedly, pink improves serotonin levels.

It may sound obvious, but painting a pretty picture is also a stonewall way to build a brand. It’s the way NatGeo, the ‘Holy Grail’ of social media content, amassed their mega 350m follower count across platforms. They give the account credentials to the photographers, who are trekking through the wild to capture the shots of leopards and dolphins and hyenas: the people who know the photograph best.

Make it snappy

Perhaps the most important aspect of it all in the digital era is selling your content in as minimal a time scale as possible.

Megan used a quote to describe how critical it is to make your image or video as bold as possible when people are always swiping right or scrolling down.’ The scarcest commodity of the 21st century is our attention,’ she says. ‘The attention economy is a cruel mistress and takes no prisoners. Get their attention in six seconds or not at all.’

‘It’s probably less than that,’ she added. It sounds harsh, but it’s true.

GIFS are a goldmine in a six-second world. Short form video content, as GIFS are, on a loop, is worth 1000 words. Megan referenced a study by global orange juice brand Tropicana, where they measured traffic from minute-long, 45, 30, 15 and 6 seconds adverts. The most successful? Take a guess.

Six-second ads on TV are booming and are a win-win for brands. They cost less time and money to make and air.

She ended the session with the following piece of storytelling advice: ‘Think of your story like a joke – distill it down to the punchline.’ There’s no place for timewasters in a window-shopping society.

Join 100,000+ fellow marketers who advance their skills and knowledge by subscribing to our weekly newsletter.

WATCH OUR SMWLA 2019 PROMO

The post NBCUniversal’s Key Tip For Thumb-Stopping Content: Employ the 6 Second Rule appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/05/nbcuniversals-key-tip-for-thumb-stopping-content-employ-the-6-second-rule/

The Most Critical Ingredient to Meaningful Content is UGC, Says Social Native

Fashion, fitness, fishing —there is an account for everything on social media. Yet, brands are struggling with limited opportunities for content that could actually speak to the disposition of so many different audiences.

How can brands create meaningful content on demand?

Jeff Ragovin, Chief Growth Officer at Social Native, believes he has an easy answer: By tapping into the power of users, or user-generated content (UGC).

Being meaningful = being authentic

A true creator trumps an influencer when it comes to finding meaningful content, Ragovin said, because meaningful is also tied to being authentic.

“People on the subway are on their phones … addicted to what people are creating,” Ragovin said, noting that a lot of the time, if we look around, people are on their friends’ or families’ accounts and not necessarily spending much time on brand accounts.

Join SMW Insider to watch this #SMWNYC session

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“Brand ads that are perfect are not seen because people are so used to seeing friends’ work,” he said.

He used the “Shot on iPhone” ads seen on billboards and bus stops as an example of what the Apple brand is doing to keep content meaningful, authentic, and within reach.

Avoid the one-size-fits-all approach

Along with the issue of too-perfect images, brands struggle when they run one-size-fits-all ad campaigns, forgetting that there are hundreds of thousands of kinds of audiences —remember fashion, fitness, fishing— out there.

Ragovin wonders why brands are not reaching out to those hundreds of thousands of people to not only ask them what they would prefer, but because they are often the “mini-creators” of those preferences and for a fraction of the cost.

With so much potential to personalize a product, so many brands are still using a white backdrop in their images, when Ragovin says it would be more meaningful if they showed how real people use the product.

In fact, Ragovin believes there are tremendous options for brands to tap into, highlighting the online real estate database company Zillow and their use of UGC videos for a recent ad campaign.

Zillow compiled two hundred videos that were shot across the country and on mobile phones, only, by people who were getting the keys to their new homes within their ad. That is, content created by real people.

“Think of what that would cost, to send a crew around the country. It would take a lot of time and be really expensive,” he said.

Ragovin’s easy solution, then, is to have users show the brand and the rest of the world how they engage with a given product. “Real stories, for television,” Ragovin concluded.

Want to learn more from Jeff? Listen to our podcast episode with him below!

Join 100,000+ fellow marketers who advance their skills and knowledge by subscribing to our weekly newsletter.

WATCH OUR SMWLA 2019 PROMO

The post The Most Critical Ingredient to Meaningful Content is UGC, Says Social Native appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/05/the-most-critical-ingredient-to-meaningful-content-is-ugc-says-social-native/

YouTube Promises “Blunt Actions” to Secure Child Safety and Soothe Advertisers

A 2018 Cheq and IPG Media survey revealed that most consumers believe that ad placement is intentional; further, they are 2.8 times less willing to associate with a brand when its ads are displayed in environments that are unsafe or unsavory. Given that tidbit, it’s no surprise to see the exodus of advertisers from YouTube in the wake of parallel scandals over sexually inappropriate and anti-vaccination content.

This week, the platform hastened a number of measures in the works to combat this content, and addressed its advertisers in the most comprehensive way yet.

A copy of the letter obtained by AdWeek revealed a combination of contrition and concentration, as the company works to crack down on offenders and demonetize content that presents danger to their users. “Because of the importance of getting child safety right,” they wrote, “we announced a series of blunt actions to sharpen our ability to act more precisely.

Among the measures swiftly undertaken this week:

  • The disabling of comments on “tens of millions of videos” that could attract predatory behavior
  • “Reducing the discoverability” of content that has been flagged (a strategy that Pinterest has used with some success)
  • Terminating offending accounts
  • “Increasing accountability” within the community of creators on the site, a community that uploads a staggering 400 hours of video to the site each second
  • “A more unforgiving stance” for creators who post inappropriate children’s content
  • The hastening of development on a machine learning powered “comments classifier,” which will ultimately be able to flag and remove twice as many comments as the existing system, a combination of algorithms and manual reviewers.

These measures have been deployed in hopes of stopping YouTube’s proverbial bleeding of advertisers, which in recent days has included AT&T, Disney, Nestle, McDonalds, Epic Games, and several others. AT&T reportedly told the New York Times, “until Google (YouTube’s parent company) can protect our brand from offensive content of any kind, we are removing all advertising from YouTube.” A similar exodus of advertisers took place back in 2017, when AT&T ads, along with those of Johnson & Johnson and Verizon were placed alongside racist content and videos posted by terrorist groups. This time, the company’s countermeasures have been swift and public.

The problem is a complicated one, as one executive (speaking anonymously) shared with FastCompany.

“There is no such thing as 100% safety when it comes to user-generated content, and marketers need to know that although there can be a zero-tolerance effort, there’s no such thing as 100% brand safety or 0% risk.”

The measures above, along with demonetizing videos in certain categories, can move a platform toward being a safer place. The 10,000 content reviewers that YouTube brought on in the wake of their 2017 scandal can also make a dent in the problem. But it still may not be enough.

In a statement, YouTube acknowledged, “there’s more to be done, and we continue to work to improve and catch abuse more quickly.” With any luck, this aggressive and comprehensive attention to addressing these concerns – for the sake of advertisers, and the viewing public using the platform – will continue long after the media firestorm dies down.

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http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/03/youtube-promises-blunt-actions-to-secure-child-safety-and-soothe-advertisers/

YouTube Promises “Blunt Actions” to Secure Child Safety and Soothe Advertisers

A 2018 Cheq and IPG Media survey revealed that most consumers believe that ad placement is intentional; further, they are 2.8 times less willing to associate with a brand when its ads are displayed in environments that are unsafe or unsavory. Given that tidbit, it’s no surprise to see the exodus of advertisers from YouTube in the wake of parallel scandals over sexually inappropriate and anti-vaccination content.

This week, the platform hastened a number of measures in the works to combat this content, and addressed its advertisers in the most comprehensive way yet.

A copy of the letter obtained by AdWeek revealed a combination of contrition and concentration, as the company works to crack down on offenders and demonetize content that presents danger to their users. “Because of the importance of getting child safety right,” they wrote, “we announced a series of blunt actions to sharpen our ability to act more precisely.

Among the measures swiftly undertaken this week:

  • The disabling of comments on “tens of millions of videos” that could attract predatory behavior
  • “Reducing the discoverability” of content that has been flagged (a strategy that Pinterest has used with some success)
  • Terminating offending accounts
  • “Increasing accountability” within the community of creators on the site, a community that uploads a staggering 400 hours of video to the site each second
  • “A more unforgiving stance” for creators who post inappropriate children’s content
  • The hastening of development on a machine learning powered “comments classifier,” which will ultimately be able to flag and remove twice as many comments as the existing system, a combination of algorithms and manual reviewers.

These measures have been deployed in hopes of stopping YouTube’s proverbial bleeding of advertisers, which in recent days has included AT&T, Disney, Nestle, McDonalds, Epic Games, and several others. AT&T reportedly told the New York Times, “until Google (YouTube’s parent company) can protect our brand from offensive content of any kind, we are removing all advertising from YouTube.” A similar exodus of advertisers took place back in 2017, when AT&T ads, along with those of Johnson & Johnson and Verizon were placed alongside racist content and videos posted by terrorist groups. This time, the company’s countermeasures have been swift and public.

The problem is a complicated one, as one executive (speaking anonymously) shared with FastCompany.

“There is no such thing as 100% safety when it comes to user-generated content, and marketers need to know that although there can be a zero-tolerance effort, there’s no such thing as 100% brand safety or 0% risk.”

The measures above, along with demonetizing videos in certain categories, can move a platform toward being a safer place. The 10,000 content reviewers that YouTube brought on in the wake of their 2017 scandal can also make a dent in the problem. But it still may not be enough.

In a statement, YouTube acknowledged, “there’s more to be done, and we continue to work to improve and catch abuse more quickly.” With any luck, this aggressive and comprehensive attention to addressing these concerns – for the sake of advertisers, and the viewing public using the platform – will continue long after the media firestorm dies down.

Join 100,000+ fellow marketers who advance their skills and knowledge by subscribing to our weekly newsletter.

WATCH OUR 2019 PROMO

The post YouTube Promises “Blunt Actions” to Secure Child Safety and Soothe Advertisers appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/03/youtube-promises-blunt-actions-to-secure-child-safety-and-soothe-advertisers/

YouTube Promises “Blunt Actions” to Secure Child Safety and Soothe Advertisers

A 2018 Cheq and IPG Media survey revealed that most consumers believe that ad placement is intentional; further, they are 2.8 times less willing to associate with a brand when its ads are displayed in environments that are unsafe or unsavory. Given that tidbit, it’s no surprise to see the exodus of advertisers from YouTube in the wake of parallel scandals over sexually inappropriate and anti-vaccination content.

This week, the platform hastened a number of measures in the works to combat this content, and addressed its advertisers in the most comprehensive way yet.

A copy of the letter obtained by AdWeek revealed a combination of contrition and concentration, as the company works to crack down on offenders and demonetize content that presents danger to their users. “Because of the importance of getting child safety right,” they wrote, “we announced a series of blunt actions to sharpen our ability to act more precisely.

Among the measures swiftly undertaken this week:

  • The disabling of comments on “tens of millions of videos” that could attract predatory behavior
  • “Reducing the discoverability” of content that has been flagged (a strategy that Pinterest has used with some success)
  • Terminating offending accounts
  • “Increasing accountability” within the community of creators on the site, a community that uploads a staggering 400 hours of video to the site each second
  • “A more unforgiving stance” for creators who post inappropriate children’s content
  • The hastening of development on a machine learning powered “comments classifier,” which will ultimately be able to flag and remove twice as many comments as the existing system, a combination of algorithms and manual reviewers.

These measures have been deployed in hopes of stopping YouTube’s proverbial bleeding of advertisers, which in recent days has included AT&T, Disney, Nestle, McDonalds, Epic Games, and several others. AT&T reportedly told the New York Times, “until Google (YouTube’s parent company) can protect our brand from offensive content of any kind, we are removing all advertising from YouTube.” A similar exodus of advertisers took place back in 2017, when AT&T ads, along with those of Johnson & Johnson and Verizon were placed alongside racist content and videos posted by terrorist groups. This time, the company’s countermeasures have been swift and public.

The problem is a complicated one, as one executive (speaking anonymously) shared with FastCompany.

“There is no such thing as 100% safety when it comes to user-generated content, and marketers need to know that although there can be a zero-tolerance effort, there’s no such thing as 100% brand safety or 0% risk.”

The measures above, along with demonetizing videos in certain categories, can move a platform toward being a safer place. The 10,000 content reviewers that YouTube brought on in the wake of their 2017 scandal can also make a dent in the problem. But it still may not be enough.

In a statement, YouTube acknowledged, “there’s more to be done, and we continue to work to improve and catch abuse more quickly.” With any luck, this aggressive and comprehensive attention to addressing these concerns – for the sake of advertisers, and the viewing public using the platform – will continue long after the media firestorm dies down.

Join 100,000+ fellow marketers who advance their skills and knowledge by subscribing to our weekly newsletter.

WATCH OUR 2019 PROMO

The post YouTube Promises “Blunt Actions” to Secure Child Safety and Soothe Advertisers appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/03/youtube-promises-blunt-actions-to-secure-child-safety-and-soothe-advertisers/

How a Culture of Collaboration Between Brands and Marketers Leads to Business Results

Burger King Global CMO Fernando Machado believes marketing is a combination of logic and magic, and that creativity is a driving force to build brands and achieve business results.

When asked by Viacom Head of Ad Solutions Sean Moran, whom he sat with for a fireside interview at CES, about the fine line between the art and science parts of marketing, Machado said we need both. “Everyone has the same data. So, if you’re just managing by data, you’re probably not doing anything that its very different,” he said.

Earlier, during a keynote presentation, Machado cited Mark Zuckerberg’s “the biggest risk is not taking any risk” quote, and encouraged the audience of brand marketers to “let the idea grow” and “trust uncertainty” as ways to achieve the kind of creative breakthrough that moves the needle for brands.

During the subsequent fireside Q&A, the Burger King CMO also embraced data, which he says his team uses to “come up with insights.” “We test everything to make it better,” he said, adding that even though they tend to be more conservative “when there was a lot of media money,” in most cases, they took calculated risks as long as they were on brand/brief.

Moran noted that Machado’s ability to tap into the zeitgeist to revamp a culturally connected brand like Burger King wouldn’t have been possible without the right team. Machado credited his agencies, which he affectionately calls “my partners in crime.” “I hate the expression client/agency,” he’d said adding that he liked to think of brand and agencies as a unified “brand team.”

This way of “creating a culture within the organization,” as Moran described it, has given Burger King its most-recent brand wins, such as the Google Home Whopper, McWhopper, and Chocolate Whopper campaigns, which in many cases originated in the company’s regional offices. “When you set up reactions through results, people feel they are empowered to do more,” Machado said.

When Machado highlighted Burger King’s star-studded chicken strips campaign, Moran asked him about his take on influencer marketing. “I don’t have anything against celebrities or influencers as long as it’s authentic,” the Burger King CMO said. He added that five years ago he would’ve been focused on finding someone who has the most reach, now he’d go for someone smaller as long as the influencer has “an authentic history or affinity with the brand”.

Lastly, the top marketers addressed the way technology is changing QSR. “We still have a lot to do regarding CRM,” Machado, who admitted to having come to CES to learn best practices, said. “I wish we would’ve been here for many years back,” he concluded.

The fireside interview between Sean Moran, Head of Ad Solutions of Viacom, and Fernando Machado, Global CMO of Burger King, was conducted as part of the annual Brand Innovators “Brands Bet on Digital” Conference which was held in Las Vegas in conjunction with the Consumer Electronic Showcase (CES).

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WATCH OUR 2019 PROMO

The post How a Culture of Collaboration Between Brands and Marketers Leads to Business Results appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/02/how-a-culture-of-collaboration-between-brands-and-marketers-leads-to-business-results/

YouTube Doubles Up on Pre-Roll Ads for Long-Form Content

As video length has expanded on YouTube, the platform has been challenged to find an effective ad display solution that doesn’t mimic the inconvenience of commercial interruptions. This week’s announcement—doubling up on pre-roll advertising spots—sounds like more ad content, but the results appear promising so far. Brands and agencies who host long-form content on their YouTube channels stand to see benefits from this latest change; however, a need to be compelling and attention-grabbing from the start will be all the more necessary.

In the coming weeks, desktop YouTube viewing will afford viewers the option to skip ads (which won’t preclude ads from appearing later in their viewing experience) or to watch two ads at the start of a video. Free and ad-supported Hulu subscriptions presently do something similar; Mashable rightfully calls it a “TV-inspired solution.” Otherwise known at YouTube as “ad pods,” a brief explanation will come up as they decide: “choose when you see ads; watch two ads now for fewer interruptions later.” The option will then gradually deploy for mobile viewers, and then those watching on smart TV sets.

Khushbu Rathi, YouTube’s product manager for video ads, noted on the company blog that the early tests on the feature had increased staying power on long-form content. “Fewer interruptions is correlated with better user metrics, including less abandonment of content and higher rates of ad viewing,” Rathi wrote. Users who opt to watch both ads ahead of a video will see up to 40% fewer ad interruptions, and tested videos saw an 8-11% increase in unique user reach. For advertisers, there will be a 5-10% increase in ad frequency.

In some ways, this seems like the evolution of an announced introduction of non-skippable ads for creators this past August. At that time, YouTube announced, “any channel that can monetize its videos will soon be able to implement non-skippable ads” of 15-20 seconds in length. Previously, only a select number of creative accounts could deploy ads in this fashion. But a number of creators quickly voiced a prospective challenge: audiences might click away from unskippable ads altogether, therefore preventing any ad revenue from coming in. By offering more ads but presenting the details for users to make informed decisions about their viewing experience, YouTube seems to be retaining more viewers on longer videos.

While a few questions remain as this strategy rolls out—the timeline for deployment, if creators can select ad categories, and most notably: what runtime constitutes a “long video”?—Rathi and his team seem committed to evolving the ad experience for advertisers and viewers alike: “we’ll continue working to build the ideal video viewing experience, and keep thinking up ways to deliver value for our advertiser partners.”

Learn the latest trends, insights and best practices from the brightest minds in media and technology. Sign up for SMW Insider to watch full-length sessions from official Social Media Week conferences live and on-demand.

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http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2018/11/youtube-doubles-up-on-pre-roll-ads-for-long-form-content/

Here’s Why a Data-Driven Approach is the Key to Creating Content

At Social Media Week Los Angeles 2018, Yuval Rechter, Head of Digital at First Media (Blossom, So Yummy and Blusher) discussed the trials and tribulations of creating branded content that feels authentic through case studies, algorithm changes, and how to gain ‘super fans’ that drive viral video success.

In this clip, Yuval talks about why it’s important to pay attention to your audience demographics and what actions your audience take when you post content.

Read the full recap and sign up for SMW Insider to watch the full session.

Learn the latest trends, insights and best practices from the brightest minds in media and technology. Sign up for SMW Insider to watch full-length sessions from official Social Media Week conferences live and on-demand.

The post Here’s Why a Data-Driven Approach is the Key to Creating Content appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2018/10/heres-why-a-data-driven-approach-is-the-key-to-creating-content/

Giphy Says It’s Worth $300 Million Because It’s a Real-Time Media Platform

Three years ago, Giphy was just two weeks old, having just been launched by co-founders Alex Chung and Jace Cooke as a hacked-together search engine for animated GIFs–something they created as a side project within the New York-based tech incubator Betaworks. On Tuesday, the company announced a $55 million financing round that values Giphy at…

http://fortune.com/2016/02/17/giphy-platform/