Tag Archives: Video Marketing

Marketing Services for Small and Medium sized businesses in Wales!

Are you a small or medium sized business in Wales?

Do you require more customers or help with you marketing?

If so we can provide the following Marketing Services:

A New Website – Website Design & Build

– get more customer through more engagement and more targeted content,

SEO Services

– Get your website found and gain more enquiries;

Video Production Services

– have a new business marketing video to say more to your customers in a quick and simple way that will get high customer engagement;

Video Marketing Services

– Gain lots of views of your new marketing video;

App Design & Development Services

– We will build a customer contact & marketing app for you, helping to make your life easier and getting your customers to work for you;

App marketing services

– we will get your existing & new customers to use your app, helping to make your life much easier;

Social Media Marketing Services & Social Media Management Services

– we will manage your social media and build the following as well as plan and implant a content marketing strategy, so that you can get on with what you do best;

Social Media Advertising Services

– We can market your company, products, offers, videos, marketing literature, websites and SocialMedia accounts to help you gain more customers, via our own Social Media following of over 200,000+ engaged followers.

For more info on any of these Marketing Services for Small and Medium sized businesses in Wales please call: 07517 024979 or email: maconsultancy1@gmail.com

The Marketing Services for Small and Medium sized businesses in Wales page was posted “By Mike Armstrong”

IMG_0153.JPG

Seasons Greetings Videos for your #Business for the bargain price of £99+ vat from @TwitMynt

20141115-000448.jpg

Seasons Greetings Videos from Mynt Media

For a limited time only, Mynt Media are giving all businesses an opportunity to create a professionally filmed Christmas and New Year message for them to spread the Christmas cheer and thank their customers for all of their support during 2014.

These Seasons Greetings Videos will look like the following video (link below image):

20141115-000200.jpg
Seasons Greeting Video

These Seasons Greetings videos are fantastic for social media and website updates and will save you precious time when sending out Christmas cards!

The normal price of these Christmas message videos is £299 + VAT however they will film, edit and produce your very own Seasons Greetings video including music and animation for just £99 + VAT. It will only take 15-20 minutes of your time and Mynt Media will take care of the rest.

20141115-000408.jpg
If you are interested in a seasonal greetings video contact Mynt Media using code MAC1:

Bob Kennedy
Mynt Media

20141115-000121.jpg
07918 080749
19 Cathedral Rd | Cardiff | CF11 9HA | United Kingdom

In addition to Video Production Mynt Media also provide the following Marketing Services:


VIDEOS
Promotional corporate videos to increase brand awareness and google rankings
WEB
Affordable professional websites to suit all budgets
APPS
Your content in a native mobile app.
ANIMATION
Company animations to inform your customers
CORPORATE PHOTOGRAPHY
Professional images of your business

For more see: Mynt Media – Video Production Company

The Seasons Greetings Videos for your #Business for the bargain price of £99+ vat from @TwitMynt page is posted “By Mike Armstrong”

Seasons Greetings Videos for your #Business for the bargain price of £99+ vat from @TwitMynt

20141115-000448.jpg

Seasons Greetings Videos from Mynt Media

For a limited time only, Mynt Media are giving all businesses an opportunity to create a professionally filmed Christmas and New Year message for them to spread the Christmas cheer and thank their customers for all of their support during 2014.

These Seasons Greetings Videos will look like the following video (link below image):

20141115-000200.jpg
Seasons Greeting Video

These Seasons Greetings videos are fantastic for social media and website updates and will save you precious time when sending out Christmas cards!

The normal price of these Christmas message videos is £299 + VAT however they will film, edit and produce your very own Seasons Greetings video including music and animation for just £99 + VAT. It will only take 15-20 minutes of your time and Mynt Media will take care of the rest.

20141115-000408.jpg
If you are interested in a seasonal greetings video contact Mynt Media using code MAC1:

Bob Kennedy
Mynt Media

20141115-000121.jpg
07918 080749
19 Cathedral Rd | Cardiff | CF11 9HA | United Kingdom

In addition to Video Production Mynt Media also provide the following Marketing Services:


VIDEOS
Promotional corporate videos to increase brand awareness and google rankings
WEB
Affordable professional websites to suit all budgets
APPS
Your content in a native mobile app.
ANIMATION
Company animations to inform your customers
CORPORATE PHOTOGRAPHY
Professional images of your business

For more see: Mynt Media – Video Production Company

The Seasons Greetings Videos for your #Business for the bargain price of £99+ vat from @TwitMynt page is posted “By Mike Armstrong”

Seasons Greetings Videos for your Business for the bargain price of £99+ vat

20141115-000448.jpg

Seasons Greetings Videos from Mynt Media

For a limited time only, Mynt Media are giving all businesses an opportunity to create a professionally filmed Christmas and New Year message for them to spread the Christmas cheer and thank their customers for all of their support during 2014.

These Seasons Greetings Videos will look like the following video (link below image):

20141115-000200.jpg
Seasons Greeting Video

These Seasons Greetings videos are fantastic for social media and website updates and will save you precious time when sending out Christmas cards!

The normal price of these Christmas message videos is £299 + VAT however they will film, edit and produce your very own Seasons Greetings video including music and animation for just £99 + VAT. It will only take 15-20 minutes of your time and Mynt Media will take care of the rest.

20141115-000408.jpg
If you are interested in a seasonal greetings video contact Mynt Media using code MAC1:

Bob Kennedy
Mynt Media

20141115-000121.jpg
07918 080749
19 Cathedral Rd | Cardiff | CF11 9HA | United Kingdom

In addition to Video Production Mynt Media also provide the following Marketing Services:


VIDEOS
Promotional corporate videos to increase brand awareness and google rankings
WEB
Affordable professional websites to suit all budgets
APPS
Your content in a native mobile app.
ANIMATION
Company animations to inform your customers
CORPORATE PHOTOGRAPHY
Professional images of your business

For more see: Mynt Media – Video Production Company

The Seasons Greetings Videos for your Business for the bargain price of £99+ vat page is posted “By Mike Armstrong”

How to make your podcasts stand out…

New post on Online Marketing Hub

How to Stand Out in a World of Dull Podcasts
by christopherjanb

Think about this for a moment. Your favorite podcasts.

This American Life.

WTF with Marc Maron.

Pat Flynn’s Smart Passive Income.

Every single one of them started at the bottom. Every single one of them started in obscurity. Every single one of them started without an audience.

It’s hard to believe. Over 25 years ago, at age 19, Ira Glass was an intern at NPR, and a terrible writer. It took him, he confesses, eight years to learn how to effectively structure a story. Now he hosts a show with nearly two million weekly listeners.

Marc Maron was a late-30-something comedian, twice divorced, holding the record for most guest spots on Late Night with Conan O’Brien as his only claim to fame when he started his podcast — a somewhat desperate gig considering the fact he’d just been fired from his job.

He now regularly boasts the number one podcast in comedy on iTunes.

As a “Job Captain” at an architecture firm in Southern California, Pat Flynn loved his job and enjoyed life. Until he got laid off. That event, devastating for sure, turned out to benefit Flynn.

He decided to work for himself and launched a podcast, which has become a top-ranked business podcast on iTunes featured in the New York Times.

Three people. Three podcasts. Three success stories. All from normal people like you.

Life before podcasts
In the past, when we were young, restless, and abrupt, we all started with a blog, perhaps one that was free. Or we bit the bullet and bought a paid version, something like Typepad.

Every day we dutifully published a post — sounding off on the circus called politics, or sharing our everyday traumas, or teaching others a new skill.

Blogs were a boon for both the shy and the verbose. Then, around 2004, along came the podcast. Now we could use audio to share our opinions, dramas, and skills.

Former MTV host Adam Curry, smitten by the new technology, doubled down on podcasts. In fact, he launched iPodder.org, a platform that allowed you to easily subscribe to shows.

But alas, the idea was before its time and quietly boiled away in the background. Seems even with an app like iPodder.org, downloading episodes was still a clunky process.

We weren’t ready for podcasts until smartphones — with the ability to stream or download on the spot — saturated the market.

Introducing the rebirth of podcasts
Once the technology caught up with the concept, podcasts took off again. So much so that audio is now a foundational content format that provides you with the opportunity to tap into large distribution networks like iTunes and Stitcher.

See, if you only write on a blog, you are invisible to the audiences on these other networks.

But if you start a podcast, you become visible to these large networks, and you can also enhance your podcast’s visibility by publishing the transcript online. And why not do this when audio is relatively cheap to create. How cheap?

Jerod Morris and I produce The Lede podcast with a couple of decent microphones through Skype or Google Hangouts. Jerod edits with GarageBand, a free app from Apple. We then publish to iTunes and Stitcher. The cost is in our time and a small fee for the transcript. Everything else is free.

The one thing your podcast must have
Perhaps you’ve reached a stage in your life where you are ready to do something for yourself. You have a story to tell. A business idea you want to cultivate. Opinions about music that must be heard.

If you don’t have an audience, consider building one with a podcast. Your finished audio product will give you text to publish on a blog, too. (Just keep in mind that once you churn out the transcript, it’s best to polish it up for readability, since transcripts often aren’t publication quality, or even proofread.)

The beauty of this approach is that you create two pieces of content that honor two different learning styles — in half the time. Anyone who can speak can do this. But there is one thing your podcast must have: structure.

Rambling is a no-no. There are only a few people in the world who can go off script and keep a podcast interesting. And while it may seem they are off script, the truth is they just prepared intensely for the podcast.

Howard Stern, for example, can get away with it because in reality he doesn’t ramble. His experience and preparation carry the interviews right along. The same goes for world-class interviewers like Katie Couric, Jim Lehrer, and Dick Cavett.

Preparation is everything when you create media. It not only serves your audience, who does not want to listen to a rambling mess (no matter how authentic you think it is), preparation also serves you.

Giving your podcast structure and order makes it easier to convert into other formats. As Brain Clark said:

Many, many people are able to create fantastic content and create audiences and end up with content that can be repurposed into other formats by doing audio interviews.

But it can be tough to get the right people on your show, especially when you’re just starting out.

How to get superstars on your show
Most people in your industry with even a smidgen of reputation will be happy to jump on an interview. Doing an interview for a podcast is the equivalent to the academic world of logrolling: “I’ll give you a nice blurb about your book if you do that for me.”

It’s the trading of favors. The interviewee gets exposed to a new audience (the interviewer’s) while the interviewer gets exposed to a new audience, too. More than likely, the interviewee will share the finished product with her social media crowd.

Money is never discussed; money is never exchanged.

But when you go up the food chain, the game changes. Industry leaders have floods of requests from analysts, reporters, and podcasters. Everyone wants a piece of their time. But no one seems to have a budget.

Giving our time freely for interviews is an odd phenomenon in an economy where it is assumed we trade time for money. If you want something from me — my time, my experience, my results — you will have to pay me for that.

No one bats an eye at this expectation (unless you charge outlandish fees). As we all like to say, “I have a family to feed.”

This is important when you start a podcast. While interviewing industry players can help you build a body of work, it probably won’t lead to any breakthrough. In fact, it often leads to a humdrum echo chamber.

Your breakthrough won’t occur until you snag that talk with an unreachable industry authority. Then people will pay attention. And, more than likely, pay money for the content.

A classic example of the value of great content
Let me give you an example of why this actually makes a lot of sense.

Two guys who paid $100,000 for the rights to Napoleon Hill’s book Think and Grow Rich, before it landed in the public domain, started Guthy-Renker – a powerhouse direct response company and pioneer of ethical infomercials with $2 billion a year in sales.

You are probably saying to yourself, “That’s a classic book. Everyone has read it. They probably drained their life savings for that. What a stupid gamble.”

Truth is, not everyone has read it. There was still a huge, thirsty market for Hill’s ideas. With those rights in hand, Guthy and Renker created an infomercial starring Hall of Fame quarterback Fran Tarkenton.

They made $10 million off that one commercial.

Clearly, it was a smart move and money well spent. Given that, paying an expert a reasonable hourly fee to provide you with content seems like a smart move, too — one way to distinguish yourself from the ordinary crowd of podcasts.

Here’s the magic of this approach
Once you have great content and the rights to use it as your intellectual property, which is what Guthy-Renker did, you could:

Give it away as an asset pillar.
Put that content behind a paywall as part of a content library.
Use the transcripts to create an ebook you can sell.
Send interviews monthly as part of a private members email newsletter.
Create a video tutorial.
Design an infographic around the ideas discussed in the podcast.
And so on.

Your turn
The hard part is getting people on your show if you don’t have an audience. But once you have an audience, people will ask you if they can be on your show.

How do you prompt the catalyst? What do you have to do to hit that breakthrough — to crack the top 10 on iTunes in your category?

Paying a few rock stars to appear on your podcast might just do the trick.

The lesson of this article is that paying for great content is worth it down the road.

That’s because as long as you obtain the rights to your audio, which can be accomplished with a very simple release guests should sign if you pay them, then you can use (and monetize) the content however you choose.

That’s a smart strategy in a world full of ordinary podcasts.

Whom would you like to have as a guest on your podcast?

How would his or her expertise serve your audience?

If you don’t currently have a podcast, what’s stopping you from starting one?

Share your thoughts over in the discussion on Google+ …

And if you would like to learn more about this approach to podcasting, check out our New Rainmaker course — a two-week training opportunity that will teach you how to create the type of media your customers will love.

Click here to register for the free course.

About the author
Demian Farnworth
Demian Farnworth is Copyblogger Media’s Chief Copywriter. Follow him on Twitter or Google+.

The post How to Stand Out in a World of Dull Podcasts appeared first on Copyblogger.

For more on this article or content marketing see:
http://omhub.wordpress.com/2014/10/13/how-to-stand-out-in-a-world-of-dull-podcasts/

The How to make your podcasts stand out… Page was posted “By Mike Armstrong”

Video Marketing Tips

New post on Online Marketing Hub

Hear the Call? 3 Steps for Better Video CTAs
by christopherjanb

As more of you expand your foray in video content marketing, you undoubtedly know (and have been told) that a call to action (CTA) is an absolute must have. That all-important prompt encourages someone to actually do something and it offers an opportunity to evaluate your video’s effectiveness.

Advice on how to weave an engaging and tightly integrated CTA into your video is much less decisive. Create a funny and personal or slick-motion graphic? Incorporate in video or description? The fact is that there is no single answer. The secrets to crafting a great CTA address your unique circumstances.

This guide focuses on YouTube because the CTA design is more direct and easier to measure than on other platforms. (Vimeo, for example, is a popular tool because of its visual clarity and compression for crowd-founded campaigns like Kickstarter, but those initiatives often have different goals.) In a medium where there are no one-size-fits-all solutions, access to information is key for successful content marketing.

Step 1: Assess your goals

Your CTA is the nudge you give viewers so that they will do something, so what do you want them to do? Take stock of of your business goals in both abstract and specific terms:

What do you want to achieve with this video? Be broad. Evaluate how the video is designed to contribute to your goals. Do you want viewers to buy a product, install an app or subscribe to your channel?
How can your CTA support those goals? Be specific. If you want someone to purchase a product, does the CTA allow them to click through to the sales funnel? If you want more YouTube followers, does it encourage them to subscribe to your channel? If you want viewers to visit an affiliate, is the affiliate identified with a clear link?
After you’ve nailed down exactly what you want your CTA to achieve, your next task is to create something that meets these goals as effectively as possible.

Step 2: Identify the best options

At this point you have two decisions to make: how should you craft your CTA stylistically and which tools can help you meet the goals.

How does your CTA fit with the video content? Think thematically. Let’s use Dove’s Real Beauty Sketches as an example. The video is pensive, introspective, and emotionally charged. As such, the CTA on the screen at the video’s end is thoughtful, restrained, and unobtrusive. Dove didn’t use brightly colored annotations or loud noises. In its description, Dove simply included a hashtag and link.
Now look at Cartoon Hangover Bravest Warriors episodic cartoon’s CTA end card. It’s busy, colorful and energetic, just like the video.

Its visible description focuses on the episode and doesn’t include a CTA, and the full description reads like closing credits for a show.

Both Dove and Cartoon Hangover understood their videos — they matched the CTA to the video, and more importantly they matched the CTA to their goals. For a B2C like Dove, its primary objective was to encourage viewers to further their experience with the brand, while Cartoon Hangover’s primary objective was to inform viewers about the show.

What tools will effectively communicate your CTA?

Annotations: These pop-up messages on the video don’t have to detract from the viewing experience, but if they show up in the meatier content they can. The upside is that users can interact with your CTA immediately within the video experience. The downside is that annotations have a tendency to make users bounce, and annotations don’t appear on mobile or set-top boxes. Annotations in end cards? Totally cool.
Descriptions: A video description offers two-fold viewing — a few sentences on the first screen underneath the video and an expanded version after the viewer clicks “show more.” Including CTA links in descriptions is both better and worse than annotations because they don’t distract the viewer from the video experience. They’re more versatile than annotations and engaged viewers will naturally check your description for more information. But be careful about how you use your real estate: the first three lines of your description are a critical part of YouTube SEO (YouTube is the world’s second largest search engine), and the first lines are all that appear on the first screen.
Verbal (speaker mentions) vs. (direct host): A CTA during the video that comes from the narrator or host can carry more emotional weight than an end-card CTA. It also requires you to lock you into a single CTA so make sure the CTA is sufficiently attractive or powerful to engage viewers. Unlike an end card, which can be changed and updated easily, a speaker mention cannot be changed without significant production overhead. Many Kickstarter videos use this technique because viewers are likely already on the campaign page, making the next step obvious.
In addition, if your videos involve multiple speakers or subjects, the person speaking may not be in a position to deliver a meaningful CTA. In those cases, consider filming a separate end card with a familiar host that can be shot and edited separately.

Other in-video CTAs: In-video CTAs can be more effective because they can be delivered before viewers fall off. (Visible Measures reports one-third stop before the timer hits 30 seconds.)
In this edition of its Ripple Effect videos, Red Bull opens the video with its general web address then uses Red Bull.com/Surfing as on the opening credit slide. The CTA returns 14 minutes 30 seconds later in the end credits. Note the lack of annotations in the video, though.

End cards: CTAs on the end cards can work, but it’s a risky move given a good portion of your audience may not still be viewing. That means you should explore all CTA options, but don’t give up on end cards. The 40+% of your audience that may still be watching are probably interested and looking for more information.
As we’ve seen, there are pros and cons to every tool and stylistic decision you make, but this can be mitigated by combining CTA styles. Make sure they all support your goals so that you can don’t risk overcomplicating your pool of results and possibilities.

Step 3: Test, measure, and iterate

After you implement your CTAs, the evaluation begins. What happens with your CTAs? How you measure your CTA depends on what goals you’re trying to hit, but since many marketers are ultimately trying to push YouTube viewers off site and into their own funnels, we’ll focus on three critical measurements:

Measure in-video CTA viewership: If you click on Audience Retention in YouTube Analytics, you can see at which points viewers are dropping off, and this information can be used in multiple ways. For example, a significant drop-off that coincides with an annotation is a good sign that viewers do not think the CTA is too disruptive to the experience. Perhaps more importantly, these analytics allow you to see what percentage of users even makes it to your CTA. You can calculate a CTA viewership number by multiplying the number of total views by the percentage that made it to the point in video with a CTA.
Measure click-throughs: Other than clicking the universal “X” in the right corner of a page to cease viewing, there are only two ways to click out of YouTube – through annotations to your verified website (known in YouTube parlance as Associate Website Annotations) or through links in the description.
Ultimately, you want is to extrapolate the conversion rate of your CTA by dividing the number of views by the number of out-bound clicks. This CTA-conversion rate is a really handy way to compare variations in your execution.

Tip: Further track your CTAs by using custom links through shortened-URL sites like Bit.ly, which can bring in demographic and easy-tracking data for each CTA.

Measure your annotations: You can see how well an annotation is performing by visiting the Annotations page under Engagement Reports in YouTube Analytics. Enter the name of your video and not only will you get your number of clicks, but also the close rate (the number of times a viewer closed the video when the annotation appeared).

Conclusion

This three-step video CTA process can help you create a goal-oriented CTA, pick the right delivery avenues, gauge each CTA’s effectiveness, and adjust and use analytics to evaluate what you should continue, change, or stop. It will likely take a few tries before you’ve developed an effective style, but once done, you will have a systematic approach to engaging your audience, increasing retention and in turn, boosting the number of people responding to your CTA.

Evaluating the effectiveness of your video’s call to action is important to your video content marketing program’s success. Want to explore further measurement tools? Check out our online How-to Guide for Measuring Success.

For more about this video call to action article or content marketing in general see:
http://omhub.wordpress.com/2014/10/14/hear-the-call-3-steps-for-better-video-ctas/

Tips for better Video Call To Actions page posted “By Mike Armstrong”

Twitter Marketing Services – Cardiff, Wales, UK to Consumer and/or Businesses (B2B)!

Would you like to market your Cardiff or Welsh business products or services, website, blog, Facebook Page, video, marketing literature, company offers or competitions to 200k twitter followers.

Our 200k Twitter followers include 200k Consumers (100k of which are ABC1 Business owners) & 100k Business Owners, Directors or Decision Makers!

Approximately 100k are located in Wales (100k Consumers of which 50k are Businesses Owners / Directors) and the other 100k are through the UK (many across the M4 corridor and In the South East of England including London)!

Many of these followers are in specific niches including Welsh Followers, Business Owner & Decision Makers, Business Networkers, Exhibitors, Wedding Industry, Fashion, Sport, Business News etc.

Our Twitter Marketing Services start from £300 (£50 a month for 6 months or £100 a month for 3 months) and go up to any amount depending on requirements and amount of activity required.

If you want to subscribe to our Twitter Marketing Services or want to discuss them further please email: maconsultancy1@gmail.com or call: 07517 024979.

The Twitter Marketing Services page was posted “By Mike Armstrong”

Video Marketing Tips

New post on Online Marketing Hub

Hear the Call? 3 Steps for Better Video CTAs
by christopherjanb

As more of you expand your foray in video content marketing, you undoubtedly know (and have been told) that a call to action (CTA) is an absolute must have. That all-important prompt encourages someone to actually do something and it offers an opportunity to evaluate your video’s effectiveness.

Advice on how to weave an engaging and tightly integrated CTA into your video is much less decisive. Create a funny and personal or slick-motion graphic? Incorporate in video or description? The fact is that there is no single answer. The secrets to crafting a great CTA address your unique circumstances.

This guide focuses on YouTube because the CTA design is more direct and easier to measure than on other platforms. (Vimeo, for example, is a popular tool because of its visual clarity and compression for crowd-founded campaigns like Kickstarter, but those initiatives often have different goals.) In a medium where there are no one-size-fits-all solutions, access to information is key for successful content marketing.

Step 1: Assess your goals

Your CTA is the nudge you give viewers so that they will do something, so what do you want them to do? Take stock of of your business goals in both abstract and specific terms:

What do you want to achieve with this video? Be broad. Evaluate how the video is designed to contribute to your goals. Do you want viewers to buy a product, install an app or subscribe to your channel?
How can your CTA support those goals? Be specific. If you want someone to purchase a product, does the CTA allow them to click through to the sales funnel? If you want more YouTube followers, does it encourage them to subscribe to your channel? If you want viewers to visit an affiliate, is the affiliate identified with a clear link?
After you’ve nailed down exactly what you want your CTA to achieve, your next task is to create something that meets these goals as effectively as possible.

Step 2: Identify the best options

At this point you have two decisions to make: how should you craft your CTA stylistically and which tools can help you meet the goals.

How does your CTA fit with the video content? Think thematically. Let’s use Dove’s Real Beauty Sketches as an example. The video is pensive, introspective, and emotionally charged. As such, the CTA on the screen at the video’s end is thoughtful, restrained, and unobtrusive. Dove didn’t use brightly colored annotations or loud noises. In its description, Dove simply included a hashtag and link.
Now look at Cartoon Hangover Bravest Warriors episodic cartoon’s CTA end card. It’s busy, colorful and energetic, just like the video.

Its visible description focuses on the episode and doesn’t include a CTA, and the full description reads like closing credits for a show.

Both Dove and Cartoon Hangover understood their videos — they matched the CTA to the video, and more importantly they matched the CTA to their goals. For a B2C like Dove, its primary objective was to encourage viewers to further their experience with the brand, while Cartoon Hangover’s primary objective was to inform viewers about the show.

What tools will effectively communicate your CTA?

Annotations: These pop-up messages on the video don’t have to detract from the viewing experience, but if they show up in the meatier content they can. The upside is that users can interact with your CTA immediately within the video experience. The downside is that annotations have a tendency to make users bounce, and annotations don’t appear on mobile or set-top boxes. Annotations in end cards? Totally cool.
Descriptions: A video description offers two-fold viewing — a few sentences on the first screen underneath the video and an expanded version after the viewer clicks “show more.” Including CTA links in descriptions is both better and worse than annotations because they don’t distract the viewer from the video experience. They’re more versatile than annotations and engaged viewers will naturally check your description for more information. But be careful about how you use your real estate: the first three lines of your description are a critical part of YouTube SEO (YouTube is the world’s second largest search engine), and the first lines are all that appear on the first screen.
Verbal (speaker mentions) vs. (direct host): A CTA during the video that comes from the narrator or host can carry more emotional weight than an end-card CTA. It also requires you to lock you into a single CTA so make sure the CTA is sufficiently attractive or powerful to engage viewers. Unlike an end card, which can be changed and updated easily, a speaker mention cannot be changed without significant production overhead. Many Kickstarter videos use this technique because viewers are likely already on the campaign page, making the next step obvious.
In addition, if your videos involve multiple speakers or subjects, the person speaking may not be in a position to deliver a meaningful CTA. In those cases, consider filming a separate end card with a familiar host that can be shot and edited separately.

Other in-video CTAs: In-video CTAs can be more effective because they can be delivered before viewers fall off. (Visible Measures reports one-third stop before the timer hits 30 seconds.)
In this edition of its Ripple Effect videos, Red Bull opens the video with its general web address then uses Red Bull.com/Surfing as on the opening credit slide. The CTA returns 14 minutes 30 seconds later in the end credits. Note the lack of annotations in the video, though.

End cards: CTAs on the end cards can work, but it’s a risky move given a good portion of your audience may not still be viewing. That means you should explore all CTA options, but don’t give up on end cards. The 40+% of your audience that may still be watching are probably interested and looking for more information.
As we’ve seen, there are pros and cons to every tool and stylistic decision you make, but this can be mitigated by combining CTA styles. Make sure they all support your goals so that you can don’t risk overcomplicating your pool of results and possibilities.

Step 3: Test, measure, and iterate

After you implement your CTAs, the evaluation begins. What happens with your CTAs? How you measure your CTA depends on what goals you’re trying to hit, but since many marketers are ultimately trying to push YouTube viewers off site and into their own funnels, we’ll focus on three critical measurements:

Measure in-video CTA viewership: If you click on Audience Retention in YouTube Analytics, you can see at which points viewers are dropping off, and this information can be used in multiple ways. For example, a significant drop-off that coincides with an annotation is a good sign that viewers do not think the CTA is too disruptive to the experience. Perhaps more importantly, these analytics allow you to see what percentage of users even makes it to your CTA. You can calculate a CTA viewership number by multiplying the number of total views by the percentage that made it to the point in video with a CTA.
Measure click-throughs: Other than clicking the universal “X” in the right corner of a page to cease viewing, there are only two ways to click out of YouTube – through annotations to your verified website (known in YouTube parlance as Associate Website Annotations) or through links in the description.
Ultimately, you want is to extrapolate the conversion rate of your CTA by dividing the number of views by the number of out-bound clicks. This CTA-conversion rate is a really handy way to compare variations in your execution.

Tip: Further track your CTAs by using custom links through shortened-URL sites like Bit.ly, which can bring in demographic and easy-tracking data for each CTA.

Measure your annotations: You can see how well an annotation is performing by visiting the Annotations page under Engagement Reports in YouTube Analytics. Enter the name of your video and not only will you get your number of clicks, but also the close rate (the number of times a viewer closed the video when the annotation appeared).

Conclusion

This three-step video CTA process can help you create a goal-oriented CTA, pick the right delivery avenues, gauge each CTA’s effectiveness, and adjust and use analytics to evaluate what you should continue, change, or stop. It will likely take a few tries before you’ve developed an effective style, but once done, you will have a systematic approach to engaging your audience, increasing retention and in turn, boosting the number of people responding to your CTA.

Evaluating the effectiveness of your video’s call to action is important to your video content marketing program’s success. Want to explore further measurement tools? Check out our online How-to Guide for Measuring Success.

For more about this video call to action article or content marketing in general see:
http://omhub.wordpress.com/2014/10/14/hear-the-call-3-steps-for-better-video-ctas/

Tips for better Video Call To Actions page posted “By Mike Armstrong”