Tag: social media week new york

Here’s How Reddit’s Technology and New Partnership are Supporting Mental Health

Today’s teens spend nearly seven and a half hours on their phones each day per a recent report by Common Sense Media, a non-profit dedicated to promoting safe technology and media use for children. Those in the tween category (ages 8 to 12) don’t fall far behind in comparison spending roughly four hours and 45 minutes daily.

As these stats have evolved, there has been a lot of research and discussion around the correlation between this screen time and the mental health and wellbeing of younger demographics. While some argue the linkage is clear and direct, others push back and advocate the connection is more nuanced — that it is about the quality of use that determines whether the relationship to the platforms is healthy and productive or if it’s simply a distraction from larger issues and there isn’t enough adequate mental health services at their disposal.

Younger users are becoming increasingly aware of the negative implications of their social media use and are turning to the platforms to help them take the steps to mitigate these appropriately.

PROVIDING AN OFF-RAMP TO KEY RESOURCES

A growing number of platforms including Snapchat and Pinterest are innovating around opportunities to meet their users where they are and connect them with the communities and tools they can take offline. Reddit is yet another example recently unveiling a slew of suicide prevention tools created in partnership with the Crisis Text Line. Specifically, the update includes a feature that allows Redditors to report those who are encountered and felt to be at risk.

Users can flag someone through reporting a comment or piece of content or by using a button on the individual’s user profile. To report directly from a post, simply select the option that reads, “Someone is considering suicide or serious self-harm.” Alternatively, if you’re on the person’s profile, tap the prompt that says “get them help and support.” A note: if you’re accessing Reddit from your computer on a web browser this will fall under the “more options” section.

When a user is flagged, the platform will send a private message including details to access mental health resources and a suggestion to text the phrase ‘CHAT’ to the number for the Crisis Text Line, 741741. They will then be connected to a trained counselor with whom they can text for as long as they need to have someone to actively empathize with them and help them get to the root of their thoughts and feelings.

EMPLOYING GOOD AI: FUELING NEW APPROACHES TO PUBLIC HEALTH

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is leveraging artificial intelligence from Reddit and Twitter to improve the forecasting of suicide rates. Its current figures, according to a spokesperson, are currently delayed up to two years, negatively influencing policy updates the allocation of resources. This is a significant problem given suicide rates have surged 40 percent in less than two decades.

Without the most up-to-date numbers, the agency can’t properly respond and improve how it’s directing its efforts so it’s relying on platforms to help whittle down publicly available data and address the question: how can signals from various real-time sources be leveraged in order to offset this one to two-year lag?

A helpful source has been reports that break down keyword use across platforms related to suicide. When combined with other CDC data including crisis text and call lines and previous suicide rates from the National Vital Statistics program, newer algorithms can be trained to forecast the actual rate.

“We can now estimate these rates of suicide up to a year in advance of when death records become available,” said Munmun de Choudhury, a professor at Georgia Tech’s School of Interactive Computing who is working with the CDC on this project, in a statement to Recode. What does this say for future projections? Data collected until December 2019 can be employed to predict the suicide rate for every week of 2021. She added that the initial phase of the research had an error rate of less than 1 percent.

Social media can be a force for deeper and more empathetic human connection. But, as brands and platforms, we need to put our creative energy behind the programs, partnerships, and technology at our disposal if we are to make a dent in the problem. We have a moral obligation to ensure we’re creating safe and meaningful spaces in which today’s youth can interact and grow and understand the importance of empathy as a foundational skill.

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The post Here’s How Reddit’s Technology and New Partnership are Supporting Mental Health appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2020/03/heres-how-reddits-technology-and-new-partnership-are-supporting-mental-health/

Why LinkedIn is Bringing Ephemeral Marketing into the Business World

Our industry faces an entire generation growing up with Stories as a preferred way of forging digital relationships. They’re more private, comfortable, foster a greater sense of trust and loyalty, and above all ephemeral stories live for a moment in time versus in the feed forever.

They first appeared on Snapchat with Facebook and Instagram following suit shortly after, and they caught fire for their ability to deliver in a lighter, more fun way to share without it having to be carefully filtered and attached to your profile for the long haul.

LinkedIn’s Journey into Ephemeral Marketing

What might this content look like in a professional context? Can this exist in the business world? LinkedIn is determined to find the answers as it continues to see the volume of conversations on the platform increase. From features to Newsletters, Live Video, Trending News, and Reactions, the platform is now turning to the Stories bandwagon.

The company currently sees a 25 percent year-over-year increase in engagement spanning sharing job updates, business reports, collaborating to share creative strategies, and bringing a community together to remember the loss of a basketball player whose life and career inspired generations of fans.

“Last year, we started asking ourselves what Stories might look like in a professional context…I’m excited to see how Stories will bring creativity and authenticity to the ways that members share more of their work life, so that they can build and nurture the relationships necessary to become more productive and successful,” said Pete Davies, LinkedIn’s Head of Content Products in the official announcement. Specifically, he pointed to the full-screen format as ideal for sharing “key moments from work events” and sharing the digestible “tips and tricks that help us work smarter.”

Preparing for a Stories-Driven Future

According to Business Insider, 66 percent of U.S. creative and digital decision-makers plan to invest in Stories this year, and only 62 percent expect to channel their dollars into News Feed advertising. What does this really mean? The Stories are no longer a novelty and their effectiveness will be an important consideration in 2020 and many years ahead.

Let’s take a look at some overarching creative best practices you can use whether you’re new to the scene or looking to take your existing strategy to new heights.

Stay true to your brand

One of the biggest draws to Stories is the authentic peek behind the curtain it gives to your audience. With this in mind, a general rule of thumb to pocket should be to design your creative around your ad’s objective. For example, if it’s tied to a brand objective, emphasize the human element. If it’s more focused on conversion, spell out the important benefits of your product or service.

If there’s uncertainty around the specific objective, look to your brand’s mission as a guidepost. Start with important brand elements and see where connections can be made to how the specific ad can be tied back to the overall purpose.

Aim for a blend of visuals, text and sound

Case studies have found 83 percent of videos using stickers helped express key messages about the brand or product whereby another study using static creatives showed there is an 87 percent chance ads without stickers deliver better conversion results than with stickers. The bottom line? The best strategy when considering visuals in your Story is to ask yourself if it feels like it belongs in the environment or if it simply makes the message feel more like an ad and takes away from it being relatable.

Similarly, sound and text overlays can feel inconsistent and take attention away from your core messages. Use these only when they feel aligned with the ad’s objective and not if it feels disingenuous or distracting from the call to action you’re looking to convey to your audience.

Keep attention with vertical designs and speed

Stories are consumed much faster compared to other existing mediums. To cater to this, a top tip is to craft your ad to grab attention from the first frame and use speed to keep their attention through the end of the ad. A couple of ways to achieve this include using multiple scenes that are short and digestible. If a scene consists of static imagery, consider adding motion to add some liveliness.

When experimenting with videos and asset design, studies have shown that organically shot videos on mobile are effective when it comes to ad recall and intent while professionally crafted content often drives more brand awareness. If you’re designing yourself, feel free to repurpose content as desired but above all, the full- screen vertical design will be the most natural fit for the Stories medium.

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The post Why LinkedIn is Bringing Ephemeral Marketing into the Business World appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2020/03/why-linkedin-is-bringing-ephemeral-marketing-into-the-business-world/

Statement Regarding SMW New York and COVID-19

SMW Community,

For the past several months we’ve been hard at work planning the 12th edition of Social Media Week New York. While we are excited for this year’s conference and have never been more proud of the program we are working hard to produce, we are also seriously monitoring the current situation around the COVID-19 outbreak. We have no plans to cancel the conference at this time, but will continue to stay up to date on important developments as our first priority is to the health and wellbeing of our participants.

With just over two months until kickoff, we remain hopeful that the virus can be contained and/or managed prior to the first week of May. In terms of this specific event, we’ve looked closely at where our attendees, speakers, and sponsors will be traveling from where and can confirm there are no large groups attending from high-risk countries.

Our team appreciates your patience as the situation evolves and asks for your continued commitment to Social Media Week. We’re pleased to see that we’re currently tracking ahead of last year in terms of registrations, and we will continue with our relentless efforts to make this an incredibly valuable learning, sharing, and networking experience.

In line with the WHO’s guidelines around planning for mass gatherings in the context of this global health issue, our decision to move forward with the program is based on a thorough risk assessment. This includes taking all recommendations from the New York City government and the CDC seriously and following relevant conferences within our industry for best practice examples. We are also staying in regular communication with our venue, The Sheraton Times Square, and our existing partners.

Beyond our own precautions, we realize many of you are involved in your own company’s response plans and protocols and we offer our well wishes for success in coping with this challenging and unpredictable situation. If your business must adhere to travel bans, we fully respect this and are prepared to offer a number of alternative options to take advantage of such as:

Pass Transfers:

  • You can transfer your pass to a friend or colleague who would receive permission to attend SMW New York 2020.
  • We can apply the pass credit for the same city in 2021, or any one of our other flagship conferences in 2020 (SMW Los Angeles or SMW London)

SMW Insider & Mobile App Networking: If pass transferring is not of interest, your pass provides you access to SMW Insider, where you can watch the livestream of the majority of mainstage sessions, together with over 300 hours talks, panels and interviews from past SMW Flagship events.

Mobile app networking: You can also still download the mobile app to network with fellow SMW delegates where you can connect with like-minded industry peers to complement the content experience provided by SMW Insider. We are excited to announce that we are launching a new attendee app experience in early April that will have enhanced networking features.

As always, please feel free to contact our team directly with any questions you may have at newyork@socialmediaweek.org.

Thank you so much for your continued support and participation,

– Team SMW

WATCH THE SMWNYC 2019 RECAP

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http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2020/03/statement-regarding-smw-new-york-and-covid-19/

Gary Vaynerchuk to Close Out #SMWNYC + Major Agenda Updates!

We’re beyond excited to share some huge announcements with you today!

First, we’re thrilled to announce that the inimitable Gary Vaynerchuk will be joining our founder Toby Daniels on stage for the closing keynote on May 7th.

It’s unlikely you’ve not heard of him, but for the uninitiated Gary is one of the most influential people in social media and digital marketing over the past 10 years. He’s the Chairman of VaynerX, CEO and Co-Founder of VaynerMedia, a full-service digital agency servicing Fortune 500 clients across the company’s four locations and author of five New York Times best-selling books including “Crushing It!: How Great Entrepreneurs Build Business and Influence-and How You Can, Too.”

Gary rose to prominence in the late ‘90s after establishing one of the first e-commerce wine sites, WineLibrary, a family business that he helped his father grow from 4 to 60MM in sales. Today, he has amassed a huge social media audience across several platforms including TikTok where he has over 3M followers.

In addition to confirming our closer for #SMWNYC 2020, we’re also over the moon regarding the newest additions to the agenda, which we are also releasing today, including:

  • How Hulu Helps DTC Brands Stream to Success, hosted by Hulu
  • Having a Heart and Driving Growth: Combining Art and Science to Make a Difference, with Grubhub
  • Little Resources, Big Results: How to Make an Impact with Video, with Vimeo
  • Are Employees the New Influencers? with General Electric
  • Why Authenticity is Key to Human-First Influencer Marketing, with Takumi
  • The Lost Art of Anticipation, with Netflix
  • How To Create Brand Experiences That Are Built to Scale, with Heineken
  • The Devil in Discourse, hosted by Code and Theory
  • Bringing Transparency and Accountability to Influencer Marketing: Navigating the Wild West, with Whalar
  • Augmented Reality isn’t an Accessory, it’s a Staple, hosted by Havas New York
  • Why Your Marketing Campaign Will Never Go Viral, with Twitter
  • After The Fall: Marketing In the Post Attention Era, with Salesforce

This is just a small taste of the latest additions to the program and we have more major announcements to come in the next few weeks, including the agenda for The Brand Leaders Summit, the full lineup for the SMW Academy program and more partner announcements.

Browse the full agenda and secure your pass by next Friday, February 14 to take advantage of the 20% discount before it expires.

WATCH THE SMWNYC 2019 RECAP

The post Gary Vaynerchuk to Close Out #SMWNYC + Major Agenda Updates! appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2020/02/gary-vaynerchuk-to-close-out-smwnyc-major-agenda-updates/

What the New ‘Off-Facebook’ Activity Tool Really Means for Advertisers and Users

Two years ago Facebook hinted at giving users an option to remove the browsing history utilized it us to deliver targeted ads at its annual F8 developer conference following the Cambridge Analytica Scandal. Fast forward to today, and after several unexpected delays, the platform is pulling the trigger officially. In doing so, it is making a pretty firm stance on the evolution of a permission-based, personalized future.

The Off-Facebook Activity: What is it and how to use it?

The platform is introducing the “Off-Facebook Activity” menu available to users on a global scale where they have the option to:

  • View a summary of the information other apps and websites have sent Facebook
  • Disconnect this information from their account
  • Disconnect future off-Facebook activity from their account (this holds for all off-Facebook activity or only specific apps or websites

“Other businesses send us information about your activity on their sites, and we use that information to show you ads that are relevant to you. Now you can see a summary of that information and clear it from your account if you want to. Off-Facebook Activity marks a new level of transparency and control.”

Now that you’re briefed on what the new feature enables, here’s a quick run-down of how to use the feature.

To begin, click on the drop-down menu in the top right of the desktop version of Facebook. Then, select “Settings” followed by “Your Facebook Information.” You’ll then be presented with an option for “Off-Facebook Activity” as depicted below:

From there you can browse all of the websites sharing your information with Facebook and decide whether to clear your history and remove this information from your account, strip the tracking for specific sites, or disable this tracking in entirety. Full disclosure — by turning off the tracking Facebook says you’ll still see the same number of ads and it can receive information about your activity, it just won’t be associated with your account. In other words, the ads you are fed will be less personalized.

What does this mean for the advertising industry?

There are several implications with regards to the advertising industry to note here. Primarily, giving users the onus to remove their details will inevitably make it harder for advertisers to retarget customers that visit their apps, websites, or make purchases in-store. In terms of measuring success, without these added specifics, it will likely be harder for brands to trace who was served an ad when and whether it was effective or not.

The good news? The majority of users will likely appreciate the gesture but not take the time to go through and remove the traces to the large number of websites who have collected it over the years. Several advertisers who have already spoken out anticipate adoption of the feature among the public will be limited.

“Consumers have a track record of apathy when it comes to actively managing their privacy,” said Aaron Goldman, CMO at marketing technology company 4C in a statement to Mashable. “Whether it’s deleting cookies or clearing history, these tools typically get very little usage and have very little impact on marketers.

On top of this, and more importantly, while the majority of social media users have voiced growing concerns about not knowing when their data is being collected, by who, and how it is being used, the overwhelming preference remains: personalized advertisements that align with their needs, interests and values will always garner higher engagement than those that are irrelevant.

“You should be able to easily understand and manage your information, which is why strengthening your privacy controls is so important. We’ll have more to share as we continue to make progress on this important work in the decade ahead.”

Learn more about Privacy Matters as part of our 2020 global theme: HUMAN.X and help us establish a human-first, experience-driven approach to digital marketing. Secure your early-bird discount today to save 20% on your full-conference pass to #SMWNYC (May 5-7, 2020).

WATCH THE SMWNYC 2019 RECAP

The post What the New ‘Off-Facebook’ Activity Tool Really Means for Advertisers and Users appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2020/02/what-the-new-off-facebook-activity-tool-really-means-for-advertisers-and-users/

How Custom Instagram AR Filters Can Boost Your Brand’s Personality

Augmented reality (AR) filters have been introduced to Instagram since 2017, but more recently the feature has found new momentum through parent company Facebook’s Spark AR Studio, a platform launched in August 2019 that allows users to create customized AR filters for Instagram Stories, Facebook Stories, Messenger and Portal.

According to Instagram, one-third of the most viewed Stories on the platform come from businesses and more than 200 million users visit at least one business account each day. While that isn’t to say this tool may be right for every brand, these stats are reason enough to at least test the waters.

Here, we break down the steps for how you can get started, the key benefits it can offer your brand, and a few examples in action to help kick-start your inspiration:

Why create your own original filters?

A primary way creating your own filter can help leverage your brand is by more accurately depicting your brand’s style, flair, and tone of voice — especially if this falls into the fun and playful category. In a sea of information, these elements are critical for forging sustainable relationships and rising above the noise.

Per a Nielsen Catalina study, 56 percent of a brand’s sales lift from digital advertising can be attributed to the quality of the creative. This is largely due to the ability this offers to inform buying decisions. Using our AR filter example, potential customers can “try on” a product before making a purchase. Self-promotion aside, filters can also be used to show the human side to your brand by demonstrating your support for social causes.

Finally, a big draw of creating AR filters for your brand is increased awareness. Anyone visiting your brand’s Instagram profile can click the new face icon to see the AR filters you’ve created. When they share a selfie using one of your filters, their followers, both current and potential, will be exposed to your brand. There’s also an “upload” button that users can use to pocket their favorites for future photos.

For more general context on the growth and power behind the Stories platform, more than 500 million accounts use Stories every day and one-third of the most viewed Stories are from businesses.

Examples in action

Here are just a few samples of brands putting AR filters to use to drive brand awareness and have some fun:

Coca Cola Poland uses the Studio’s World Object Template in a filter that superimposes the brand’s polar bear on top of the real world.

Inès Longevial, a French painter and illustrator who boasts nearly 300k followers on the platform uses the ‘Save the Planet Mask’ to show her support for climate change and a ‘Flower Mask’ to highlight her creative passion and talent.

Ray-Ban launched a Reindeerized filter as a way for consumers to playfully interact with the brand and virtually try on a pair of sunglasses prior to buying.

Getting started: 5 simple steps

If seeing some examples and exploring value-adds for your brand was enough to convince you to get AR filters a try, it’s time to get creative!

Fortunately, getting started with Spark AR Studio is very simple, here are the five steps you’ll need to follow:

1. Download Spark AR Studio.

2. Get familiar.

Take a spin through the tutorials in the Learning Center to familiarize yourself with the platform and interface.

As part of the exercise, you’ll download a sample folder of content to use to follow along, which includes a 3D object (like the polar bear).

3. Start your first project.

You can create a project from scratch or by building off one of eight existing templates. A few important terms to keep in mind include the ‘Stimulator,’ where you’ll preview your work. The default is an iPhone 8 screen, but this can be changed to another device. The other is the ‘Scene panel.’ This is are where all your options live to edit your filter.

4. Test and publish.

Send a test file to Instagram or Facebook to see how your work looks like if it were live within Instagram or Facebook Stories. Alternatively, you can download the Spark AR Player app and preview there.

Once you’re set, press the “upload” button in the bottom left-hand corner directly below the “test on device” button. Note that your new effect won’t be published immediately. First, it will be reviewed to ensure it meets Spark AR’s policies and guidelines.

5. Continue learning!

There’s an endless supply of tutorials in the Learning Center. As you get more confident in your creations, experiment with ways to take your designs to new heights including

  • Using face tracking effects to create a filter that responds to movement
  • Adding hand trackers that make your filter responsive to someone’s touch
  • Creating world effects
  • Incorporating audio

As we encounter opportunities to embrace new forms of technology, it is important to remember that we can move forward innovating without losing what is core to us as people. Whether AR-driven or otherwise, we can highlight the elements of our business that are unique and that demonstrate a deeper level of understanding of consumers.

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WATCH THE SMWNYC 2019 RECAP

The post How Custom Instagram AR Filters Can Boost Your Brand’s Personality appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2020/01/how-custom-instagram-ar-filters-can-boost-your-brands-personality/

4 Major Brands and Platforms Addressing Digital Literacy and Fake News in 2020

The majority of marketers realize the issues presented by fake news and “deepfake” techniques in skewing the information we’re exposed to and the implications for determining what is fact from fiction.

We face a critical point in our industry where many brands and platforms are facing increased pressure for setting a benchmark for detecting these types of conversations.

Here are a few that are taking action in 2020.

Tumblr’s Digital Literacy Initiative “World Wide What”

With the 2020 election on the horizon, social media platforms are making moves to update their strategies to curb the spread of information. The latest to join the bandwagon is Tumblr, which recently launched an internet literacy campaign targeted to help younger demographics entering the voting scene spot fake news and unsavory posts.

The initiative, World Wide What, was developed in partnership with UK-based internet literacy organization, Ditch the Label. The campaign’s structure emphasizes six core community topics in video form that include fake news skewed views, authenticity, cyberbullying, the importance of minimizing screen time, how much we share online, and creating a safer internet through moderation.

Unlike traditional literacy materials, the platform is tapping into visual, more culturally messaging such as GIFs, memes, and short text in line with imagery native to the Tumblr brand. Videos will also leverage outside experts and industry leaders to tackle certain subjects through a series of Q&As in the coming weeks and months.

“We are constantly striving to learn and utilize new ways to create a safe place for our communities,” Tumblr shared in a statement on the World Wide What site.

Google x Jigsaw Visual Database of Deepfakes

In September 2019, Google tapped Jigsaw in an effort to develop a dataset of visual deepfakes aimed to boost early detection efforts. The tech giant worked with both paid and consenting actors to record and gather hundreds of videos which ultimately were crafted into deepfakes. The final products including both real and fake videos, were then incorporated into the Technical University of Munich and the FaceForensics benchmark and made widely available for synthetic video detection methods.

Fast forward to November, Jigsaw has continued on this momentum by releasing what it refers to as “the largest public data set of comments and annotations with toxicity labels and identity labels. “ This includes the addition of comments and annotations with toxicity and identity labels. The goal with incorporating these details is to more accurately measure bias within AI comment classification systems. Traditionally conversations are measured with synthetic data from template sentences that often fail to address the complexity and variety of comments.

“By labeling identity mentions in real data, we are able to measure bias in our models in a more realistic setting, and we hope to enable further research into unintended bias across the field,” shared in a recent Medium post. The key in the ever-evolving deepfake tech space will be a healthy and growing research community.

Twitter Policies Targeting Synthetic and Manipulated Media

Twitter is looking to its community for support in fleshing out its strategy for addressing synthetic and manipulated media, what the company defines as “…any photo, audio, or video that has been significantly altered or fabricated in a way that intends to mislead people or changes its original meaning.

As a draft to its policy, the platform has outlined that it will:

  • Place a notice next to Tweets that share synthetic or manipulated media
  • Warn people before they share or like Tweets with synthetic or manipulated media
  • Add a link – for example, to a news article or Twitter Moment – so that people can read more about why various sources believe the media is synthetic or manipulated

The platform also vowed to remove any deepfake believed capable of threatening someone or leading to serious harm. This raises the question as to how it would address these types of manipulated conversations spurring a falsity but not technically causing harm or that use newer creation methods that lag behind the detection techniques.

To garner feedback from users, the platform created a multiple-choice survey that addresses the broader preference of removing versus flagging (e.g. should altered photos and videos be removed, have warning labels, or not be removed at all). To date, the survey is closed and the platform is reported to be working on an official policy that will be announced 30 days prior to roll out.

Facebook’s “Deepfake Challenge” and Ban

This past fall Facebook teamed up with Amazon Web Services (AWS), Microsoft, and academics from Cornell Tech, University of Oxford, UC Berkley, University of Maryland, and SUNY Albany to launch the Deepfake Detection Challenge. The DFDC as its referred to includes a data set of 100k+ videos using paid actors — as well as grants and awards —aimed to inspire new ways of detecting and preventing AI-manipulated media.

The DFDC will run to the end of March of this year with the goal of “…producing technology that everyone can use to better detect when AI has been used to alter a video in order to mislead the viewer.” According to the official website, a winner will be determined based on “a test mechanism that enables teams to score the effectiveness of their models, against one or more black-box tests from our founding partners,” the company shared.

‘Deepfake’ techniques, which present realistic AI-generated videos of real people doing and saying fictional things, have significant implications for determining the legitimacy of information presented online,” shared Facebook CTO Mike Schroepfer in a recent blog post.

In addition to these efforts, the platform followed up with a new policy that would remove synthesized or edited content in ways that “aren’t apparent to an average person and would likely mislead,” or deepfake posts that use AI technologies to “merge, replace, or superimpose content onto a video, making it appear authentic.”

Again, the issue becomes how we as an industry will move forward walking the fine line between malicious deepfakes and those with less-harmful intents of creative parodies or satire.

Learn more about this topic as part of our 2020 theme HUMAN.X through the lens of the subtheme Privacy Matters. Read the official announcement here and secure your early-bird discount today to save 20% on your full-conference pass to #SMWNYC (May 5-7, 2020).

Join 100,000+ fellow marketers who advance their skills and knowledge by subscribing to our weekly newsletter.

WATCH THE SMWNYC 2019 RECAP

The post 4 Major Brands and Platforms Addressing Digital Literacy and Fake News in 2020 appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2020/01/4-major-brands-and-platforms-addressing-digital-literacy-and-fake-news-in-2020/

Announcing Our First Round of 2020 Speakers for #SMWNYC

We are excited to announce the first round of leaders who will bring our 2020 theme HUMAN.X to life at our global conference in New York on May 5-7.

Brand Leaders

Alison Moore

Alison Moore

CEO, Comic Relief Inc.

As CEO of Comic Relief USA, Alison leads the company in its mission to use entertainment to drive positive change and parlays this role and previous positions at Condé Nast, NBC Universal, Soundcloud, and HBO into the entrepreneurship space where she works closely with socially conscious start-ups.

Sam-Olstein

Sam Olstein

Executive Director, Marketing, General Electric

Sam is an innovation lead with a background in media and entrepreneurship leveraging disruptive technologies in his current role with GE to build the brand across platforms including Snapchat, Facebook, Medium, Twitter, Periscope, Medium, and over-the-top (OTP) streaming channels.

Quinn-Kilbury

Quinn Kilbury

Head of Partnerships and Consumer Experience, Heineken USA

Using an extensive background at CPG pillars, Heineken, Pepsico, and General Mills, Quinn’s expertise involves blending traditional classical marketing strategies with an understanding of evolving consumer interests that demand new business models that combine digital and real-life experiences.

Quinn-Kilbury

Mario Moreno

Head of Marketing, H&M

Mario is an experienced strategic marketer with a deep understanding of consumer audiences and branding and leverages his background with leading fashion and cosmetic brands including Forever 21 and L’Oreal to lead H&M’s journey into transforming influencers into diverse content creators.

Chris Marino

Chris Marino

Director, Global B2B Brand Strategy, American Express

Chris is an accomplished marketing lead with experience spearheading award-winning campaigns and creative content in the financial services industry that drive consideration and results through empathetic storytelling and multi-channel strategies.

Marketing Visionaries & Entrepreneurs

Rachel Tipograph

Rachel Tipograph

Founder & CEO, MikMak

After being the Global Director of Digital and Social Media at Gap, Rachel founded MikMak, a shoppable mobile video platform that is single-handedly revolutionizing the e-Commerce landscape and paving the way for how brands define their strategies for marketing to Gen Z.

Steven Bartlett

Steven Bartlett

Founder & CEO, The Social Chain

At just 27 years old, Steven heads a global team of more than 700 innovators delivering opportunities for today’s brands to be disruptors of the digital age and shares insights gleaned from this work across his content creation and top-charting podcast, “Diary of a CEO.”

Neil Waller

Neil Waller

CEO, Whalar

Noticing a fundamental shift in the way consumers connect with brands, Neil’s work centers on social media creative and influence, which is not only applied to the 200+ brands Whalar serves but is translated into his newest venture Shore Projects, a watch brand inspired by the British seaside.

Publishing Executives

YuJung Kim

YuJung Kim

President, The Dodo

YungJung’s expertise in digital media and audience and brand development is grounded by the power of positive, inspirational content — an outlook she employs at the Dodo to identify a content whitespace that serves the interest of a niche audience of animal lovers.

Kirstin Benson

Kirstin Benson

Global Vice President of Entertainment, Getty Images

Kirstin is a digital pioneer energized by the opportunity in overseeing Getty Images STUDIO to blend creative insights with customer data around visual consumption habits to help clients craft more impactful stories.

Gary Coichy

Gary Coichy

Founder and Head of Partnerships, Pod Digital Media

After 15 years of working with agencies like Mediacom and Laundry Service and brands like Lacoste and Verizon, Gary launched Pod Digital Media, a first-of-its-kind podcast agency to work with multicultural podcast creators, which has now grown to service 100+ clients.

Marketing Thought-Leaders

Mathew Sweezey

Mathew Sweezey

Head of Marketing Insights, Salesforce

Mathew serves as Principal of Marketing Insights for Salesforce and is regarded as one of the leading minds on the failure and future of marketing in his side gigs as an author and host of the award-winning podcast, ‘The Electronic Propaganda Society.’ His second book, ‘Context Revolution,’ will be available for purchase or download in March 2020.

Joe Federer

Joe Federer

Author & Former Head of Brand Strategy, Reddit

As an author, speaker, and brand strategy consultant with 11 years of experience at leading agencies including Reddit, Joe lives by the mantra that human-first marketing leads to real business results. His first book coming next year, The Hidden Psychology of Social Networks, will take a close look at why people act differently in various online environments.

Raashi Rosenberger

Raashi Rosenberger

Brand Strategy, Consumer Apps, Google

Raashi is a digital marketing leader with a background in creative strategy, insights, and integrated marketing, which she translates into her current role at Google identifying key cultural moments through a blend of data and meaningful storytelling.

Learn more about The Attention Revolution, Privacy Matters, and Empathy Economics, as part of our 2020 global theme: HUMAN.X and help us establish a human-first, experience-driven approach to digital marketing. Read the official announcement here and secure your early-bird discount today to save 30% on your full-conference pass to #SMWNYC (May 5-7, 2020).

The post Announcing Our First Round of 2020 Speakers for #SMWNYC appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/11/announcing-our-first-round-of-2020-speakers-for-smwnyc/

Here’s Your Chance To Take The Stage At SMWNYC 2020

Calling all speakers and thought leaders: We’ve opened our call for submissions for #SMWNYC 2020, to be held May 5-7 at the Sheraton New York Times Square Hotel.

The deadline is November 5th, but we encourage you to apply as early as possible, as we review pitches on a rolling basis.

To get you started, here are some insider tips to increase your chances of being selected.

Get to know the global theme

The global theme for 2020 is HUMAN.X, and will emphasize taking a hard look at the meaning of human-first, experience-led marketing and what makes our industry a force for good in the world.

We will explore this through the lens of three subthemes: The Attention Revolution, Empathy Economics and Privacy Matters.

Skim our blog post and align your pitch with some of the topics we’ve highlighted as priorities for our upcoming conferences.

Get inspiration from 2019 standout sessions

Buying Ad Space Doesn’t Work Anymore

Casey Neistat shares insights about his son’s media consumption and how buying ad space before a YouTube video does not capture an audience anymore. #SMWNYC

Posted by Social Media Week on Friday, May 17, 2019

Stories have the power to influence the world and the people who consume them, and with this influence comes responsibility.

Check out some of our favorite sessions from #SMWNYC 2019 that helped facilitate this important conversation throughout the year and were spot-on in meeting our standards:

Key criteria

We base our decisions on a number of criteria, but above all the important thing to remember is keeping your pitch focused on creating value for the audience. What they take away from your session can fundamentally shape their thinking and their perception of you as a thought-leader.

Here are some highlights to serve as your litmus test when crafting your pitch:

  • Speaker profile: Main Stage sessions are reserved for senior and/or high profile speakers.
  • Self-promotion: Sessions must not be self-promotional (person, company or product) in nature.
  • Format: Ensure your title stands out, include key audience takeaways, and build your pitch on a single topic your company is uniquely qualified to speak to.
  • Diversity: Ensuring gender balance and appropriate representation of POC is absolutely essential.

Join 100,000+ fellow marketers who advance their skills and knowledge by subscribing to our weekly newsletter.

WATCH THE SMWNYC 2019 RECAP

The post Here’s Your Chance To Take The Stage At SMWNYC 2020 appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/10/heres-your-chance-to-take-the-stage-at-smwnyc-2020/

Privacy Matters: Giving People The Right to Connect Freely and in Safe and Trusted Spaces

Our industry faces a fundamental reorientation around notions of trust and privacy. Users desire the freedom to connect freely in safe and trusted spaces and that their information won’t live permanently online. In an era of information overload, they’re plagued with the questions of who is sharing my information and how is it being used? Will it be targeted to deliver me an ad I don’t want to see?

With this shift, marketers have the opportunity to innovate and build business opportunities including creating platforms for private sharing. Privacy and safety are much more than protective measures. If people know that their privacy is a priority beyond a multi-page policy, they’ll be much more inclined to connect authentically.

Explore Social Media Week’s 2020 Global Theme: HUMAN.X

Learn More

Let’s take a look at a few key themes and trends paving the way for a more permission-based, personalized future:

Group culture

Small groups are by far the fastest-growing areas of online communication. Users increasingly want to connect privately in the digital equivalent of the living room. Groups are a means of encountering new ideas and people within platforms that form around the causes they are passionate about. They are a source for community-building.

For businesses, a few key benefits to a Facebook group, for instance, would include an added personal touch where users feel like they’re interacting with a human as opposed to a business. Marketers can also more easily drive a call-to-action or receive immediate feedback from their audience.

The Reddit community is a good example of this. The platform’s admins have and continue to learn invaluable insights from the platform’s hubs for genuine conversation, where vulnerability powers remarkable experiences. Specifically, unique subreddits for civil discourse like r/ChangeMyView or honest self-reflection like r/AmITheAsshole have informed Reddit’s transparent approach to communicating with its own users – and in turn – become the core playbook for Reddit’s Brand Strategy team.

Ephemeral stories

In today’s digital landscape, people are more cautious about having a permanent record of what they’ve shared. Enter the rising popularity of ephemeral stories.

The key elements of ephemeral marketing include authenticity, informality, and spontaneity, Audiences favor this type of content as it fosters a greater sense of excitement, trust, and loyalty. To execute this successfully, however, involves an astute understanding of your brand and what exactly you hope to achieve.

Sephora goes beyond advertising makeup products in its strategy by tapping into Instagram Stories to show shoppers how products work and look on actual people. The short videos also take the opportunity to offer additional product details than can be found on the website, as well as tips and reviews.

In the same vein of giving followers an educational “behind the scenes” look, NASA’s Stories often take viewers on tours of space labs across a mix of photos and video allowing for a more interactive experience. The majority of images are themed, employing consistent visual elements that create unity and clarity. This is important as different Stories from different brands play right after each other in the app.

Private messaging

According to Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, the future of communication will increasingly shift to private, encrypted services. This is due to the overwhelming preference of social media users to interact one-on-one or with just a few friends. In addition, they want the confidence that they have clear control over who can communicate with them and who has access to what they share. Simple, intimate ways to engage will continue to dominate our industry’s services and products around these ideas.

Messaging apps, for example, have outgrown social networks as the connective tools of choice and paved the way for brands to promote more consistent, private sharing.

As marketers, we have the unique ability to drive top-of-mind awareness and participate in conversations we were never able to before. We must begin to rethink relationship marketing in a transitional environment where users are favoring experiences over products.

Safety

As technology evolves, the consequences of ignorance about privacy policies have become increasingly severe. At the same time, younger generations aren’t guarding their online privacy with as much focus as older generations. They’re likely to put more of their lives online and won’t pay as much attention to the policies that dictate what happens to that information. That isn’t to say they don’t care.

In fact, a study across the United States and the United Kingdom suggested that 70 percent of Millennials believe online privacy will be further compromised in the coming years.

As an industry, we have an important responsibility to acknowledge this trend. In support of this, platforms should state make it easy for users to change the settings so that they are conscious of and comfortable with the information that they are sharing and feel in control.

This is reflected in recent findings including a joint study by IBM and the National Retail Foundation, which found that a full “55 percent [of Zers] want to decide what information they share with brands, [while] 54 percent want to control how brands contact them.”

There is also the urgency to more concretely define brand safety in the midst of growing cases of fake news and extremist content. We’ve seen this discussion brought into the limelight through a number of recent scandals. In turn, 80 percent of people in the US now claim they would reduce or stop buying a product if advertised next to extreme or dangerous content online.

Data portability

Under GDPR, the right to data portability entitles an individual to receive a copy of their personal data; and/or have their data transmitted from one controller to another controller.

For example, if Facebook knows about a given user’s interests and the content they shared (status and photos), then data portability would allow that user to take their data with them should they decide to delete Facebook.

Given brands fund the platforms, do those with the influence of ad budgets have a responsibility to push for this generally accepted privacy measure on behalf of their audiences?

Privacy has extended beyond the topic of risk management. It is vital to a company’s reputation and a central component of brand building and strategy. Paired with an obligation towards a profound respect for people’s time and attention and an agenda that fosters deeper connection with our audiences through understanding and shared experiences, we, as an industry, can begin to introduce a more human element to marketing.

Learn more about Privacy Matters, Empathy Economics, and The Attention Revolution as part of our 2020 global theme: HUMAN.X and help us establish a human-first, experience-driven approach to digital marketing. Read the official announcement here and secure your early-bird discount today to save 40% on your full-conference pass.

The post Privacy Matters: Giving People The Right to Connect Freely and in Safe and Trusted Spaces appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/09/privacy-matters-giving-people-the-right-to-connect-freely-and-in-safe-and-trusted-spaces/

Empathy Economics: Advancing Our Business Goals Through Shared Understanding & Deeper Connections

Conflict can be good for business, but as marketers, we have a fundamental responsibility to push a different agenda, one that seeks a deeper connection with our audience through understanding and shared experiences. We believe this can be an even more important driver of business success and is what we are calling Empathy Economics.

Explore Social Media Week’s 2020 Global Theme: HUMAN.X

Learn More

When trying to capture attention, our anger has transformed into a powerful signal amidst all of the noise. This phenomenon is exacerbated on platforms like Twitter, which prioritize the type of short, pithy commentary that tends to dramatize our intended points. The more we engage, the less of a chance there will be that we encounter a viewpoint that’s not our own. This is not only a societal issue, but one that also impacts businesses and brands.

The platforms are here to stay and our reliance on them is unlikely to change over time. It is almost impossible to imagine a world without them, so rather, our goal as an industry should be finding solutions to address what isn’t working.

“Empathy is a muscle: The more you use it, the stronger it gets. So, flex those empathy muscles through storytelling and expand your notion of who is in your group. Or, be willing to fall prey to the increasing ideological polarization of our time and face the global consequences.
It’s up to us.” – PJ Manney

Let’s look at some examples of where brands and platforms are providing leadership in this context.

Positive Virality

According to William J. Brady, a researcher at NYU, social media posts using moral and emotional language receive a 20 percent boost for every moral and emotional keyword used. This shines a light on a very important pattern: when trying to capture attention, our anger and negativity reign supreme. Further, platforms are algorithmically programmed to mirror back our own biases.

Due to our dependency on social media, and the behaviors we’ve gradually come to adopt, we are less likely to practice empathetic behavior online. As an industry we have a crucial role to play in closing the gap between morality systems and technology through encouraging the viral spread of positive and productive content.

Microsoft‘s 2019 Super Bowl Commercial “We All Win” is a great example of this. The ad’s story not only emphasizes the company’s commitment to building accessible technology but reiterates that we are more alike than different. The video, shared over 29 million times, is a beautiful representation of what every brand’s message should seek to promote: the acceptance and celebration of differences.

User-Controlled Feeds

As efforts to identify misinformation in a ‘fake news’ era have continued to gain steam, s, reliance on black-box algorithms persists and more users lack access to editorial processes that determine what they see. A few ways to begin solving this problem include the creation of dashboards, in which users can filter their own content by politics, rudeness, and virality, and providing users with curation tools for their own algorithms.

Designing feed control for users begs a conversation about what constitutes a healthy ‘information diet’ — something that is currently obscured by platforms. Putting users in the driver’s seat of such decisions would encourage them to learn more about the kinds of unhealthy triggers they are being regularly served and tailor the feed to their preferences.

For instance, twice a year Pinterest users show a significant change in intent specific to how they’re thinking and feeling when engaging on the platform: once during the new year as resolutions are in full swing, and again right before fall as people get inspired after an energizing summer. During these times, they show a desire to make changes to refresh their routines, set goals, get organized and stay positive.

Recognizing this, the company taps into audience data to more accurately and effectively meet their interests and match their mindset. The result? A user-controlled feed that is primed for success in helping Pinners reach their goals.

Algorithmic Fairness

As described by empathy expert, Tobias Rose-Stockwell, “Algorithms are representations of human intelligence — and just like any human creation, they can inherit and amplify our perspectives and flaws.” To summarize the idea into a single term: algorithmic bias.

Many platforms, including Facebook, already train their algorithms around the metric of what is “meaningful” to its users, however, emotions including anger are broadly considered meaningful. Ultimately, metrics are not specific enough with respect to what they’re actually measuring.

By employing metrics that measure content that users don’t want to see more of, we can better deliver a menu of choices that accurately represent their preferences, not just what they will click on. What users define as unhealthy content is an entirely different conversation.

Being empathetic and establishing a deeper understanding of our audience will continue to be good for business. By tailoring opportunities that enrich the lives of our audiences, we can create a ripple effect that results in more human-first marketing.

Learn more about Empathy Economics, Privacy Matters, and The Attention Revolution as part of our 2020 global theme: HUMAN.X and help us establish a human-first, experience-driven approach to digital marketing. Read the official announcement here and secure your early-bird discount today to save 40% on your full-conference pass.

The post Empathy Economics: Advancing Our Business Goals Through Shared Understanding & Deeper Connections appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/08/empathy-economics-advancing-our-business-goals-through-shared-understanding-deeper-connections/

Introducing Our Global Theme for 2020

Marketing is one of the most powerful forces that can shape a culture, spark a movement and change human behavior. However, as marketers, we have lost our way in recent years.

More than 10 years ago we were given the gift of Social Media; the means to be able to deepen a connection with consumers, understand them and tailor opportunities that would enrich their lives and introduce a more human element to marketing.

Register for #SMWNYC 2020 Today and Save 40% Off Your Pass!

Instead, we’ve squandered this opportunity. We chased reach and scale and vanity metrics, we created technologies, algorithms, and content that was designed to distract and interrupt and we created an online environment that promoted narcissism and divisiveness. For what? So that we could sell more stuff? To attract more eyeballs? To peddle more advertising?

As marketers, we have to do better. We need to get back to the fundamentals of what makes marketing a force for good in the world and today, I am excited to announce our theme for 2020: HUMAN.X

HUMAN.X, will explore why businesses will need to take a human-first and experience-driven approach to digital marketing in 2020 and beyond. It is underpinned by three fundamental concepts:

Attention
Revolution

An obligation to establish a deeper respect for consumer’s time and attention

Empathy
Economics

Advancing our business goals through shared understanding & deeper connections

Privacy
Matters

Giving people the right to connect freely and in safe and trusted spaces

HUMAN.X will serve as a blueprint for leaders who are looking to redefine what marketing will look like in the future.

The overarching goal will be to support ideas, campaigns and brands that embody a human-first approach to creating digital experiences, which is not only good for business, but will advance us as a society and culture.

2020 Program: Content Tracks that Drive Strategy

During our flagship conferences in New York (May 5-7), Los Angeles (June 17-18) and London (Oct 21-22) we will expand upon the HUMAN.X and also examine the state of digital marketing through nine content tracks, each of which has been mapped to what marketers have told us will be top of mind in 2020, including:

  • Content & New Formats
  • Influencer Marketing & Creators
  • Measurement & Reporting
  • Storytelling & Creativity
  • Chat & Messaging
  • Monetization & Commerce
  • Paid Media Models
  • Society & Culture
  • Emerging Trends & Future Tech

Actionable Takeaways that Map to Your Business Objectives

Whether it’s a panel debate, a fireside interview or individual talk, or one of our SMW Academy sessions, the entire program will also ladder up to six actionable strategies, including:

  • Increasing brand awareness
  • Growing and engaging audiences
  • Acquiring customers and driving sales
  • Increasing customer loyalty and retention
  • Understanding which technologies to invest in
  • Tracking the competitive landscape

What’s new and improved in 2020?

We have spent much of the past six months speaking with our community to understand how we can improve the SMW experience. Here’s what’s new for 2020:

Expanded Brand Leaders Experience

Launched in 2019, the Brand Leaders Experience is a new program from SMW designed to provide a platform for leaders to share ideas, best practices, and insights and discuss the most pressing challenges that the industry faces today and in the future.

This year we’ve already had over 200 brand leaders participate including:

Introduction of the Rising Stars Awards

The Rising Stars Awards exist to celebrate the extraordinary work of professionals we believe are the next generation of leaders. These individuals are identified based on their performance, career growth, and prior accolades and recognition received for their work.

Beyond being presented with an award, recipients are invited to participate in an interview on-stage to share their background, most significant challenges and proudest accomplishments, and their thoughts on the state of the industry.

Increased SMW Academy program

The SMW Academy program, introduced in 2019, encompasses a series of tactical sessions on critical industry category topics. Across #SMWNYC, #SMWLA, and #SMWLDN, these encompassed ways to harness successful influencer relationships, identify opportunities and challenges for sharing stories in today’s diverse social media landscape, amplify your brand story with short-form video, monetize your Facebook group, tap into strategies for picking and choosing the right social channels, and more.

Enhanced IRL and digital networking experiences

Building your connections is an invaluable opportunity to best prepare as you look to advance your career. During our conferences, we offer an enhanced assortment of digital and in-real-life (IRL) opportunities to generate ideas through communication. These include our Opening Reception, happy hours and VIP cocktail events, private meeting packages, and upgraded digital networking through our mobile app, Topi, and WhatsApp Group.

Understanding what it means to employ a human-first and experience-driven approach to digital marketing starts now and will continue throughout all of Social Media Week’s conferences and conversations throughout 2020. Join us and help redefine the future of our industry through experiences that impact people’s lives in fundamentally important and positive ways.

I’m looking forward to seeing you in 2020 and excited to share our vision for the future of marketing with you. If you have questions for me, feedback on the theme or if you are interested in getting involved, feel free to reach out to me on Twitter or LinkedIn.

Don’t miss out on your chance to attend New York’s premier media and marketing event. Save 40% by claiming your pass by 6 p.m. Friday, September 20th.

Join 100,000+ fellow marketers who advance their skills and knowledge by subscribing to our weekly newsletter.

WATCH THE SMWNYC 2019 RECAP

The post Introducing Our Global Theme for 2020 appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/08/introducing-our-global-theme-for-2020/

PODCAST: How Do We Sound? How Audio is Changing the Ways We Engage with The New York Times

This week’s episode of Social Media Week’s Leads2Scale podcast was recorded live during our Social Media Week New York event and features The New York Times’s biggest voices in audio including Michael Barbaro, host of “The Daily,” and Wesley Morris, co-host of “Still Processing,” and Sebastian Tomich, The New York Times global head of advertising and innovation.

During the conversation, they share insights into podcasting and how audio is changing the way we engage with content and storytelling.

Watch the full session on SMW Insider.

Listen to the full episode below:

Subscribe to Leads2Scale on Anchor, Apple Podcasts, Breaker, Google Podcasts, Pocket Casts, RadioPublic, Spotify, Castbox, Overcast, or Stitcher.

If you have suggestions for who we should interview or what topics you would like us to cover, please reach out to us at leads2scale@socialmediaweek.org.

Join 100,000+ fellow marketers who advance their skills and knowledge by subscribing to our weekly newsletter.

WATCH THE SMWLDN 2019 PROMO

The post PODCAST: How Do We Sound? How Audio is Changing the Ways We Engage with The New York Times appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/08/podcast-how-do-we-sound-how-audio-is-changing-the-ways-we-engage-with-the-new-york-times/

Open Future: Behind The Economist’s Successful Campaign

In 2018, The Economist, an incredibly forthright and expressive paper, ran a campaign to mark its 175th year. It took the entire “ignorance gets in the way of progress” ethos of its late founder, James Wilson, and invented the new initiative of an Open Future in order to remake the case of his liberal values.

The campaign

Conversations ran on all social media and platforms and a global event, that was a one day exercise, took place in Hong Kong, London, and New York simultaneously on the day of the companies founding. The campaign gained so much traction and maintained longevity that The Economist is running it again this year, on October 5th, this time in Chicago, Manchester and Hong Kong.

Join SMW Insider to watch this #SMWNYC session

Subscribe

The company outlined it’s main KPI’s and started from there. They wanted to engage younger audiences for liberal thoughts and knew social media was the best way to do this. They also arranged intended conversations around five key topics: diversity and identity politics, free speech and debate, migration and refugees, free trade and economics and technology and innovation.

Create a central traffic hub

In order to run a campaign well, you must create a central hub to drive all your traffic to and accumulate your data. The Economist allowed audiences to have conversations in real time with journalists and third-party members on theirs. They also produced two videos each week which could be located in the hub, too. They ran podcasts, invited audiences to write their own essays, took a debate series around the top schools in the US and streamed it. They brought in people against the very essence of what they believed in order to reinforce the message of free speech and progress. This notion demanded attention and a reaction.

Promotional tactics

They also promoted their content by PR, display advertising, direct buys, interactive posters, and experiential marketing.

As a result, The Economist reached more than half a billion touches as result of the campaign. They touched 433.5m organic social, 76.9m paid, 50.2m engaged with content, 5.3m podcast downloads, 3.4m visitors on Open Future hub, (61% of whom were new – people they hadn’t seen in 90 days) and 9k new subscribers. The Open Future videos were seen by more than 1.8m new people.

Ultimately though, they hit their main KPI of attracting a younger demographic. The most popular age of those who engaged was 28-years-old. Their social media hit 44 million people around that age, too.

The Economist’s campaign highlights the key ingredients for a rewarding marketing campaign: create a central hub, integrate across various channels and put in solid and clear KPI’s so you can make sure everything is strong and measurable.

Join 100,000+ fellow marketers who advance their skills and knowledge by subscribing to our weekly newsletter.

WATCH OUR SMWLA 2019 PROMO

The post Open Future: Behind The Economist’s Successful Campaign appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/05/open-future-behind-the-economists-successful-campaign/

Open Future: Behind The Economist’s Successful Campaign

In 2018, The Economist, an incredibly forthright and expressive paper, ran a campaign to mark its 175th year. It took the entire “ignorance gets in the way of progress” ethos of its late founder, James Wilson, and invented the new initiative of an Open Future in order to remake the case of his liberal values.

The campaign

Conversations ran on all social media and platforms and a global event, that was a one day exercise, took place in Hong Kong, London, and New York simultaneously on the day of the companies founding. The campaign gained so much traction and maintained longevity that The Economist is running it again this year, on October 5th, this time in Chicago, Manchester and Hong Kong.

Join SMW Insider to watch this #SMWNYC session

Subscribe

The company outlined it’s main KPI’s and started from there. They wanted to engage younger audiences for liberal thoughts and knew social media was the best way to do this. They also arranged intended conversations around five key topics: diversity and identity politics, free speech and debate, migration and refugees, free trade and economics and technology and innovation.

Create a central traffic hub

In order to run a campaign well, you must create a central hub to drive all your traffic to and accumulate your data. The Economist allowed audiences to have conversations in real time with journalists and third-party members on theirs. They also produced two videos each week which could be located in the hub, too. They ran podcasts, invited audiences to write their own essays, took a debate series around the top schools in the US and streamed it. They brought in people against the very essence of what they believed in order to reinforce the message of free speech and progress. This notion demanded attention and a reaction.

Promotional tactics

They also promoted their content by PR, display advertising, direct buys, interactive posters, and experiential marketing.

As a result, The Economist reached more than half a billion touches as result of the campaign. They touched 433.5m organic social, 76.9m paid, 50.2m engaged with content, 5.3m podcast downloads, 3.4m visitors on Open Future hub, (61% of whom were new – people they hadn’t seen in 90 days) and 9k new subscribers. The Open Future videos were seen by more than 1.8m new people.

Ultimately though, they hit their main KPI of attracting a younger demographic. The most popular age of those who engaged was 28-years-old. Their social media hit 44 million people around that age, too.

The Economist’s campaign highlights the key ingredients for a rewarding marketing campaign: create a central hub, integrate across various channels and put in solid and clear KPI’s so you can make sure everything is strong and measurable.

Join 100,000+ fellow marketers who advance their skills and knowledge by subscribing to our weekly newsletter.

WATCH OUR SMWLA 2019 PROMO

The post Open Future: Behind The Economist’s Successful Campaign appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/05/open-future-behind-the-economists-successful-campaign/

Open Future: Behind The Economist’s Successful Campaign

In 2018, The Economist, an incredibly forthright and expressive paper, ran a campaign to mark its 175th year. It took the entire “ignorance gets in the way of progress” ethos of its late founder, James Wilson, and invented the new initiative of an Open Future in order to remake the case of his liberal values.

The campaign

Conversations ran on all social media and platforms and a global event, that was a one day exercise, took place in Hong Kong, London, and New York simultaneously on the day of the companies founding. The campaign gained so much traction and maintained longevity that The Economist is running it again this year, on October 5th, this time in Chicago, Manchester and Hong Kong.

Join SMW Insider to watch this #SMWNYC session

Subscribe

The company outlined it’s main KPI’s and started from there. They wanted to engage younger audiences for liberal thoughts and knew social media was the best way to do this. They also arranged intended conversations around five key topics: diversity and identity politics, free speech and debate, migration and refugees, free trade and economics and technology and innovation.

Create a central traffic hub

In order to run a campaign well, you must create a central hub to drive all your traffic to and accumulate your data. The Economist allowed audiences to have conversations in real time with journalists and third-party members on theirs. They also produced two videos each week which could be located in the hub, too. They ran podcasts, invited audiences to write their own essays, took a debate series around the top schools in the US and streamed it. They brought in people against the very essence of what they believed in order to reinforce the message of free speech and progress. This notion demanded attention and a reaction.

Promotional tactics

They also promoted their content by PR, display advertising, direct buys, interactive posters, and experiential marketing.

As a result, The Economist reached more than half a billion touches as result of the campaign. They touched 433.5m organic social, 76.9m paid, 50.2m engaged with content, 5.3m podcast downloads, 3.4m visitors on Open Future hub, (61% of whom were new – people they hadn’t seen in 90 days) and 9k new subscribers. The Open Future videos were seen by more than 1.8m new people.

Ultimately though, they hit their main KPI of attracting a younger demographic. The most popular age of those who engaged was 28-years-old. Their social media hit 44 million people around that age, too.

The Economist’s campaign highlights the key ingredients for a rewarding marketing campaign: create a central hub, integrate across various channels and put in solid and clear KPI’s so you can make sure everything is strong and measurable.

Join 100,000+ fellow marketers who advance their skills and knowledge by subscribing to our weekly newsletter.

WATCH OUR SMWLA 2019 PROMO

The post Open Future: Behind The Economist’s Successful Campaign appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/05/open-future-behind-the-economists-successful-campaign/

The Strong Link Between Diversity and Innovation: Insights from Salesforce and TBWA/Worldwide

Platforms are transforming to better acknowledge real-life demographics of users across traditional and social platforms. Fifty percent of the US population under 35  are people of color and 50% of the global population are women, after all.

How can we get more action from conversations about diversifying platforms and invite more users to become part of the creative process?

Join SMW Insider to watch this #SMWNYC session

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Doug Melville, Chief Diversity Officer of TBWA\Worldwide in North America, sat down with Lola Banjo, Strategy Innovation Executive at Salesforce, during #SMWNYC to talk about the opportunities for women and people of color within a creative and digital space, among other topics.

Here are a few highlights from the conversation.

Diversity is a business imperative

While Melville’s role within diversity at TBWA\Worldwide is significant, he himself began the discussion by saying it is key that a diversity officer not always be in charge of the matter, rather turn to people who know about innovation, like Banjo, to look past an established “recipe” for diversity issues.

“People that are not in the diversity role, talking about diversity is so important because you recognize that it’s not because they’re doing their job. It’s because it is important. Diversity is a business imperative. It’s something that is going to drive real, meaningful change in our world, but it’s also driving real business results,” Banjo agreed.

The message of diversity has to be owned by a given organization or brand and “embedded in the DNA,” Banjo said.

Banjo inclusively went beyond the sentiment of variety and included research that can attest to the importance of diversity within a business, citing that companies which are gender diverse are 15% more likely to outperform. Companies that are ethnically diverse are 35% more likely to outperform. It is an undeniable win-win for all.

Innovation without inclusion fails its consumers

When testing for an audience, Banjo says she strives to find a person that is very different from herself, or her team.

“[We] dig into how we can solve for this persona that’s different,” she said, adding that it could be a middle-aged disabled woman who could most benefit from a given product if it is designed with her in mind.

Need a bigger example?

Banjo talked about a research study out of the University of Virginia which showed that women were more likely to be injured in car accidents because the crash-test dummies that product designers used were shaped as males. “I think the statistic was around 71% chance of [women] being moderately injured in an accident,” she said.

Opportunity through diverse thinking

Any medium of communication serves as a voice and is a way to connect with others, Banjo reminded people. But consumers are the ones who pick what thought patterns or conversations they want to be a part of.

Within social media, for instance, consumers can more quickly voice their takes or concerns to a company as opposed to before, when they needed to utilize snail mail or find a way to phone the headquarters.

“You can go on Twitter connect directly with a brand, you can connect with the people that are influencing that thought at the organization. It’s forcing companies to think differently as well, to think about the fact that if they do something unnecessarily wrong, it can travel through social media within a day,” she said.

Thus, the focus on diversity can make or break a brand, quickly.

Diversity just is

Banjo’s goal is to emphasize that brand and product design should not be limited to itself, but should instead consider how it will design a better world. Yet, ultimately, she hopes there will be no need for an extensive talk on diversity.

“I’m looking forward to a future where we don’t have to have a diversity conversation anymore. Where we are doing it because it just is,” she said, versus having to strategize on how to include different people.

Join 100,000+ fellow marketers who advance their skills and knowledge by subscribing to our weekly newsletter.

WATCH OUR SMWLA 2019 PROMO

The post The Strong Link Between Diversity and Innovation: Insights from Salesforce and TBWA/Worldwide appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/05/the-strong-link-between-diversity-and-innovation-insights-from-salesforce-and-tbwa-worldwide/

The Strong Link Between Diversity and Innovation: Insights from Salesforce and TBWA/Worldwide

Platforms are transforming to better acknowledge real-life demographics of users across traditional and social platforms. Fifty percent of the US population under 35  are people of color and 50% of the global population are women, after all.

How can we get more action from conversations about diversifying platforms and invite more users to become part of the creative process?

Join SMW Insider to watch this #SMWNYC session

Subscribe

Doug Melville, Chief Diversity Officer of TBWA\Worldwide in North America, sat down with Lola Banjo, Strategy Innovation Executive at Salesforce, during #SMWNYC to talk about the opportunities for women and people of color within a creative and digital space, among other topics.

Here are a few highlights from the conversation.

Diversity is a business imperative

While Melville’s role within diversity at TBWA\Worldwide is significant, he himself began the discussion by saying it is key that a diversity officer not always be in charge of the matter, rather turn to people who know about innovation, like Banjo, to look past an established “recipe” for diversity issues.

“People that are not in the diversity role, talking about diversity is so important because you recognize that it’s not because they’re doing their job. It’s because it is important. Diversity is a business imperative. It’s something that is going to drive real, meaningful change in our world, but it’s also driving real business results,” Banjo agreed.

The message of diversity has to be owned by a given organization or brand and “embedded in the DNA,” Banjo said.

Banjo inclusively went beyond the sentiment of variety and included research that can attest to the importance of diversity within a business, citing that companies which are gender diverse are 15% more likely to outperform. Companies that are ethnically diverse are 35% more likely to outperform. It is an undeniable win-win for all.

Innovation without inclusion fails its consumers

When testing for an audience, Banjo says she strives to find a person that is very different from herself, or her team.

“[We] dig into how we can solve for this persona that’s different,” she said, adding that it could be a middle-aged disabled woman who could most benefit from a given product if it is designed with her in mind.

Need a bigger example?

Banjo talked about a research study out of the University of Virginia which showed that women were more likely to be injured in car accidents because the crash-test dummies that product designers used were shaped as males. “I think the statistic was around 71% chance of [women] being moderately injured in an accident,” she said.

Opportunity through diverse thinking

Any medium of communication serves as a voice and is a way to connect with others, Banjo reminded people. But consumers are the ones who pick what thought patterns or conversations they want to be a part of.

Within social media, for instance, consumers can more quickly voice their takes or concerns to a company as opposed to before, when they needed to utilize snail mail or find a way to phone the headquarters.

“You can go on Twitter connect directly with a brand, you can connect with the people that are influencing that thought at the organization. It’s forcing companies to think differently as well, to think about the fact that if they do something unnecessarily wrong, it can travel through social media within a day,” she said.

Thus, the focus on diversity can make or break a brand, quickly.

Diversity just is

Banjo’s goal is to emphasize that brand and product design should not be limited to itself, but should instead consider how it will design a better world. Yet, ultimately, she hopes there will be no need for an extensive talk on diversity.

“I’m looking forward to a future where we don’t have to have a diversity conversation anymore. Where we are doing it because it just is,” she said, versus having to strategize on how to include different people.

Join 100,000+ fellow marketers who advance their skills and knowledge by subscribing to our weekly newsletter.

WATCH OUR SMWLA 2019 PROMO

The post The Strong Link Between Diversity and Innovation: Insights from Salesforce and TBWA/Worldwide appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/05/the-strong-link-between-diversity-and-innovation-insights-from-salesforce-and-tbwa-worldwide/

The Strong Link Between Diversity and Innovation: Insights from Salesforce and TBWA/Worldwide

Platforms are transforming to better acknowledge real-life demographics of users across traditional and social platforms. Fifty percent of the US population under 35  are people of color and 50% of the global population are women, after all.

How can we get more action from conversations about diversifying platforms and invite more users to become part of the creative process?

Join SMW Insider to watch this #SMWNYC session

Subscribe

Doug Melville, Chief Diversity Officer of TBWA\Worldwide in North America, sat down with Lola Banjo, Strategy Innovation Executive at Salesforce, during #SMWNYC to talk about the opportunities for women and people of color within a creative and digital space, among other topics.

Here are a few highlights from the conversation.

Diversity is a business imperative

While Melville’s role within diversity at TBWA\Worldwide is significant, he himself began the discussion by saying it is key that a diversity officer not always be in charge of the matter, rather turn to people who know about innovation, like Banjo, to look past an established “recipe” for diversity issues.

“People that are not in the diversity role, talking about diversity is so important because you recognize that it’s not because they’re doing their job. It’s because it is important. Diversity is a business imperative. It’s something that is going to drive real, meaningful change in our world, but it’s also driving real business results,” Banjo agreed.

The message of diversity has to be owned by a given organization or brand and “embedded in the DNA,” Banjo said.

Banjo inclusively went beyond the sentiment of variety and included research that can attest to the importance of diversity within a business, citing that companies which are gender diverse are 15% more likely to outperform. Companies that are ethnically diverse are 35% more likely to outperform. It is an undeniable win-win for all.

Innovation without inclusion fails its consumers

When testing for an audience, Banjo says she strives to find a person that is very different from herself, or her team.

“[We] dig into how we can solve for this persona that’s different,” she said, adding that it could be a middle-aged disabled woman who could most benefit from a given product if it is designed with her in mind.

Need a bigger example?

Banjo talked about a research study out of the University of Virginia which showed that women were more likely to be injured in car accidents because the crash-test dummies that product designers used were shaped as males. “I think the statistic was around 71% chance of [women] being moderately injured in an accident,” she said.

Opportunity through diverse thinking

Any medium of communication serves as a voice and is a way to connect with others, Banjo reminded people. But consumers are the ones who pick what thought patterns or conversations they want to be a part of.

Within social media, for instance, consumers can more quickly voice their takes or concerns to a company as opposed to before, when they needed to utilize snail mail or find a way to phone the headquarters.

“You can go on Twitter connect directly with a brand, you can connect with the people that are influencing that thought at the organization. It’s forcing companies to think differently as well, to think about the fact that if they do something unnecessarily wrong, it can travel through social media within a day,” she said.

Thus, the focus on diversity can make or break a brand, quickly.

Diversity just is

Banjo’s goal is to emphasize that brand and product design should not be limited to itself, but should instead consider how it will design a better world. Yet, ultimately, she hopes there will be no need for an extensive talk on diversity.

“I’m looking forward to a future where we don’t have to have a diversity conversation anymore. Where we are doing it because it just is,” she said, versus having to strategize on how to include different people.

Join 100,000+ fellow marketers who advance their skills and knowledge by subscribing to our weekly newsletter.

WATCH OUR SMWLA 2019 PROMO

The post The Strong Link Between Diversity and Innovation: Insights from Salesforce and TBWA/Worldwide appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/05/the-strong-link-between-diversity-and-innovation-insights-from-salesforce-and-tbwa-worldwide/

The Strong Link Between Diversity and Innovation: Insights from Salesforce and TBWA/Worldwide

Platforms are transforming to better acknowledge real-life demographics of users across traditional and social platforms. Fifty percent of the US population under 35  are people of color and 50% of the global population are women, after all.

How can we get more action from conversations about diversifying platforms and invite more users to become part of the creative process?

Join SMW Insider to watch this #SMWNYC session

Subscribe

Doug Melville, Chief Diversity Officer of TBWA\Worldwide in North America, sat down with Lola Banjo, Strategy Innovation Executive at Salesforce, during #SMWNYC to talk about the opportunities for women and people of color within a creative and digital space, among other topics.

Here are a few highlights from the conversation.

Diversity is a business imperative

While Melville’s role within diversity at TBWA\Worldwide is significant, he himself began the discussion by saying it is key that a diversity officer not always be in charge of the matter, rather turn to people who know about innovation, like Banjo, to look past an established “recipe” for diversity issues.

“People that are not in the diversity role, talking about diversity is so important because you recognize that it’s not because they’re doing their job. It’s because it is important. Diversity is a business imperative. It’s something that is going to drive real, meaningful change in our world, but it’s also driving real business results,” Banjo agreed.

The message of diversity has to be owned by a given organization or brand and “embedded in the DNA,” Banjo said.

Banjo inclusively went beyond the sentiment of variety and included research that can attest to the importance of diversity within a business, citing that companies which are gender diverse are 15% more likely to outperform. Companies that are ethnically diverse are 35% more likely to outperform. It is an undeniable win-win for all.

Innovation without inclusion fails its consumers

When testing for an audience, Banjo says she strives to find a person that is very different from herself, or her team.

“[We] dig into how we can solve for this persona that’s different,” she said, adding that it could be a middle-aged disabled woman who could most benefit from a given product if it is designed with her in mind.

Need a bigger example?

Banjo talked about a research study out of the University of Virginia which showed that women were more likely to be injured in car accidents because the crash-test dummies that product designers used were shaped as males. “I think the statistic was around 71% chance of [women] being moderately injured in an accident,” she said.

Opportunity through diverse thinking

Any medium of communication serves as a voice and is a way to connect with others, Banjo reminded people. But consumers are the ones who pick what thought patterns or conversations they want to be a part of.

Within social media, for instance, consumers can more quickly voice their takes or concerns to a company as opposed to before, when they needed to utilize snail mail or find a way to phone the headquarters.

“You can go on Twitter connect directly with a brand, you can connect with the people that are influencing that thought at the organization. It’s forcing companies to think differently as well, to think about the fact that if they do something unnecessarily wrong, it can travel through social media within a day,” she said.

Thus, the focus on diversity can make or break a brand, quickly.

Diversity just is

Banjo’s goal is to emphasize that brand and product design should not be limited to itself, but should instead consider how it will design a better world. Yet, ultimately, she hopes there will be no need for an extensive talk on diversity.

“I’m looking forward to a future where we don’t have to have a diversity conversation anymore. Where we are doing it because it just is,” she said, versus having to strategize on how to include different people.

Join 100,000+ fellow marketers who advance their skills and knowledge by subscribing to our weekly newsletter.

WATCH OUR SMWLA 2019 PROMO

The post The Strong Link Between Diversity and Innovation: Insights from Salesforce and TBWA/Worldwide appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/05/the-strong-link-between-diversity-and-innovation-insights-from-salesforce-and-tbwa-worldwide/

Digital Storytelling: Simple and Effective Ways to Create the Right Perspective for Your Business from Leo Burnett

For leading brands today, connection is key to a successful advertising campaign. If consumers feel they have a relationship with a business, then they will invest and make it their own – most probably for life.

During #SMWNYC representatives from some of the world’s leading brands including Johnson & Johnson, Leo Burnett, Diageo, and EquityProjectForAll came together to discuss their tactics for winning the hearts and minds of consumers with stories that penetrate and reverberate long after the campaign is done.

Join SMW Insider to watch this #SMWNYC session

Subscribe

Leveraging stories behind brands that have transformed their marketing techniques, the panelists identified ways to craft social content based on platform, audience, and campaign objective, how to integrate brand purpose authentically into social strategies, and ways to amplify your brand’s story through VR, AR, and AI to fuel engagement.

Here are three simple but effective perspectives shared during the conversation.

Do the research and create meaning.

Karuna Rawal and the #AlwaysLikeAGirl Campaign by Always.

The clever campaign shows various demographics in America being asked to do something like a girl.

All give accurate imitations of what society implies girls to do – running with arms waving – fighting with eyes closed – throwing with their wrists flared.

It highlights the female cliché and generates the perspective of the women; their audience.

“We found out through the data that typically, women lose their confidence as a result of puberty,” said Karuna Rawal, President, Groupe Client Lead, Leo Burnett.

The advert then asks females aged between 7 and 11 to do something like a girl. At this point, the young girls fight with as tough as they physically can; run as fast as they physically can; and throw like as hard as they physically can, expressing courageous confidence.

“We had the opportunity to connect with our purpose – empowering women – while bringing it together with the data – how girls confidence plummets through puberty,” added Rawal.

It just goes to show how successful a campaign can be by connecting with the perspective of the consumer.

Rawal described how women grew tired of seeing a product demonstrated to them as a way of getting them to invest.

Don’t be fake.

Neutrogena pioneered the use of the no-retouch image to show how effective their product is.

Paired with partnerships with selected celebrity, Neutrogena could leverage its brand identity to generate effective results.

By showing the perspective of their consumer through the gaze of celebrity, it generated an appeal that their consumer could trust.

The secret was in confronting what was already known.

“The goal was to really leverage our purpose and speak it through our advertising campaign” said Edlynne Laryea, Director, Global Neutrogena Digital Transformation and Sustainability, Johnson & Johnson.

If consumers know that what they see being advertised on television is a lie, then that insult isn’t going to translate into sales.

This ethos was put to the test in Neutrogena’s Valentine’s Day campaign where two actors without a script simply had some fun with the product. Simple, but effective.

“It was really important for us to tell an authentic story without any pretense. They weren’t holding up the bottle or saying use Neutrogena,” explained Laryea.

The Honest Story.

How does a Russian sounding vodka appeal to the US? By telling the honest story.

“In the US the perception is something we really have to work on,” said Jay Sethi, Vice President, Smirnoff & Nurture Brands Portfolio, Diageo.

The man behind the infamous Smirnoff ad ‘Made in America: but we’d be happy to talk about Russia under oath.’

Brands, especially old brands like Smirnoff, have long histories. More often than not, this can be great for companies – American brands emphasis their Americanness in the act of patriotism; and why not?

For Smirnoff however, history wasn’t in their favor, or at least for the time being.

Smirnoff was an American company with a Russian name – as a result of American immigration Smirnoff has a Russian name. Their history pointed out that only the affluent drank Smirnoff in Russia and they wanted to keep it that way.

“Russia just wanted Smirnoff to be for them, they wanted it to be for the Tsar’s, it was the best Vodka you could have, and they wanted it for themselves. Our founders said we want it to be for the people,” explained Sethi.

Telling the story of how Smirnoff was created in America because Russia opposed their distribution, creates a positive perspective for the American consumer and flips what was first thought of as a negative history, into a promising one.

Join 100,000+ fellow marketers who advance their skills and knowledge by subscribing to our weekly newsletter.

WATCH OUR SMWLA 2019 PROMO

The post Digital Storytelling: Simple and Effective Ways to Create the Right Perspective for Your Business from Leo Burnett appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/05/digital-storytelling-simple-and-effective-ways-to-create-the-right-perspective-for-your-business-from-leo-burnett/

Digital Storytelling: Simple and Effective Ways to Create the Right Perspective for Your Business from Leo Burnett

For leading brands today, connection is key to a successful advertising campaign. If consumers feel they have a relationship with a business, then they will invest and make it their own – most probably for life.

During #SMWNYC representatives from some of the world’s leading brands including Johnson & Johnson, Leo Burnett, Diageo, and EquityProjectForAll came together to discuss their tactics for winning the hearts and minds of consumers with stories that penetrate and reverberate long after the campaign is done.

Join SMW Insider to watch this #SMWNYC session

Subscribe

Leveraging stories behind brands that have transformed their marketing techniques, the panelists identified ways to craft social content based on platform, audience, and campaign objective, how to integrate brand purpose authentically into social strategies, and ways to amplify your brand’s story through VR, AR, and AI to fuel engagement.

Here are three simple but effective perspectives shared during the conversation.

Do the research and create meaning.

Karuna Rawal and the #AlwaysLikeAGirl Campaign by Always.

The clever campaign shows various demographics in America being asked to do something like a girl.

All give accurate imitations of what society implies girls to do – running with arms waving – fighting with eyes closed – throwing with their wrists flared.

It highlights the female cliché and generates the perspective of the women; their audience.

“We found out through the data that typically, women lose their confidence as a result of puberty,” said Karuna Rawal, President, Groupe Client Lead, Leo Burnett.

The advert then asks females aged between 7 and 11 to do something like a girl. At this point, the young girls fight with as tough as they physically can; run as fast as they physically can; and throw like as hard as they physically can, expressing courageous confidence.

“We had the opportunity to connect with our purpose – empowering women – while bringing it together with the data – how girls confidence plummets through puberty,” added Rawal.

It just goes to show how successful a campaign can be by connecting with the perspective of the consumer.

Rawal described how women grew tired of seeing a product demonstrated to them as a way of getting them to invest.

Don’t be fake.

Neutrogena pioneered the use of the no-retouch image to show how effective their product is.

Paired with partnerships with selected celebrity, Neutrogena could leverage its brand identity to generate effective results.

By showing the perspective of their consumer through the gaze of celebrity, it generated an appeal that their consumer could trust.

The secret was in confronting what was already known.

“The goal was to really leverage our purpose and speak it through our advertising campaign” said Edlynne Laryea, Director, Global Neutrogena Digital Transformation and Sustainability, Johnson & Johnson.

If consumers know that what they see being advertised on television is a lie, then that insult isn’t going to translate into sales.

This ethos was put to the test in Neutrogena’s Valentine’s Day campaign where two actors without a script simply had some fun with the product. Simple, but effective.

“It was really important for us to tell an authentic story without any pretense. They weren’t holding up the bottle or saying use Neutrogena,” explained Laryea.

The Honest Story.

How does a Russian sounding vodka appeal to the US? By telling the honest story.

“In the US the perception is something we really have to work on,” said Jay Sethi, Vice President, Smirnoff & Nurture Brands Portfolio, Diageo.

The man behind the infamous Smirnoff ad ‘Made in America: but we’d be happy to talk about Russia under oath.’

Brands, especially old brands like Smirnoff, have long histories. More often than not, this can be great for companies – American brands emphasis their Americanness in the act of patriotism; and why not?

For Smirnoff however, history wasn’t in their favor, or at least for the time being.

Smirnoff was an American company with a Russian name – as a result of American immigration Smirnoff has a Russian name. Their history pointed out that only the affluent drank Smirnoff in Russia and they wanted to keep it that way.

“Russia just wanted Smirnoff to be for them, they wanted it to be for the Tsar’s, it was the best Vodka you could have, and they wanted it for themselves. Our founders said we want it to be for the people,” explained Sethi.

Telling the story of how Smirnoff was created in America because Russia opposed their distribution, creates a positive perspective for the American consumer and flips what was first thought of as a negative history, into a promising one.

Join 100,000+ fellow marketers who advance their skills and knowledge by subscribing to our weekly newsletter.

WATCH OUR SMWLA 2019 PROMO

The post Digital Storytelling: Simple and Effective Ways to Create the Right Perspective for Your Business from Leo Burnett appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/05/digital-storytelling-simple-and-effective-ways-to-create-the-right-perspective-for-your-business-from-leo-burnett/

Digital Storytelling: Simple and Effective Ways to Create the Right Perspective for Your Business from Leo Burnett

For leading brands today, connection is key to a successful advertising campaign. If consumers feel they have a relationship with a business, then they will invest and make it their own – most probably for life.

During #SMWNYC representatives from some of the world’s leading brands including Johnson & Johnson, Leo Burnett, Diageo, and EquityProjectForAll came together to discuss their tactics for winning the hearts and minds of consumers with stories that penetrate and reverberate long after the campaign is done.

Join SMW Insider to watch this #SMWNYC session

Subscribe

Leveraging stories behind brands that have transformed their marketing techniques, the panelists identified ways to craft social content based on platform, audience, and campaign objective, how to integrate brand purpose authentically into social strategies, and ways to amplify your brand’s story through VR, AR, and AI to fuel engagement.

Here are three simple but effective perspectives shared during the conversation.

Do the research and create meaning.

Karuna Rawal and the #AlwaysLikeAGirl Campaign by Always.

The clever campaign shows various demographics in America being asked to do something like a girl.

All give accurate imitations of what society implies girls to do – running with arms waving – fighting with eyes closed – throwing with their wrists flared.

It highlights the female cliché and generates the perspective of the women; their audience.

“We found out through the data that typically, women lose their confidence as a result of puberty,” said Karuna Rawal, President, Groupe Client Lead, Leo Burnett.

The advert then asks females aged between 7 and 11 to do something like a girl. At this point, the young girls fight with as tough as they physically can; run as fast as they physically can; and throw like as hard as they physically can, expressing courageous confidence.

“We had the opportunity to connect with our purpose – empowering women – while bringing it together with the data – how girls confidence plummets through puberty,” added Rawal.

It just goes to show how successful a campaign can be by connecting with the perspective of the consumer.

Rawal described how women grew tired of seeing a product demonstrated to them as a way of getting them to invest.

Don’t be fake.

Neutrogena pioneered the use of the no-retouch image to show how effective their product is.

Paired with partnerships with selected celebrity, Neutrogena could leverage its brand identity to generate effective results.

By showing the perspective of their consumer through the gaze of celebrity, it generated an appeal that their consumer could trust.

The secret was in confronting what was already known.

“The goal was to really leverage our purpose and speak it through our advertising campaign” said Edlynne Laryea, Director, Global Neutrogena Digital Transformation and Sustainability, Johnson & Johnson.

If consumers know that what they see being advertised on television is a lie, then that insult isn’t going to translate into sales.

This ethos was put to the test in Neutrogena’s Valentine’s Day campaign where two actors without a script simply had some fun with the product. Simple, but effective.

“It was really important for us to tell an authentic story without any pretense. They weren’t holding up the bottle or saying use Neutrogena,” explained Laryea.

The Honest Story.

How does a Russian sounding vodka appeal to the US? By telling the honest story.

“In the US the perception is something we really have to work on,” said Jay Sethi, Vice President, Smirnoff & Nurture Brands Portfolio, Diageo.

The man behind the infamous Smirnoff ad ‘Made in America: but we’d be happy to talk about Russia under oath.’

Brands, especially old brands like Smirnoff, have long histories. More often than not, this can be great for companies – American brands emphasis their Americanness in the act of patriotism; and why not?

For Smirnoff however, history wasn’t in their favor, or at least for the time being.

Smirnoff was an American company with a Russian name – as a result of American immigration Smirnoff has a Russian name. Their history pointed out that only the affluent drank Smirnoff in Russia and they wanted to keep it that way.

“Russia just wanted Smirnoff to be for them, they wanted it to be for the Tsar’s, it was the best Vodka you could have, and they wanted it for themselves. Our founders said we want it to be for the people,” explained Sethi.

Telling the story of how Smirnoff was created in America because Russia opposed their distribution, creates a positive perspective for the American consumer and flips what was first thought of as a negative history, into a promising one.

Join 100,000+ fellow marketers who advance their skills and knowledge by subscribing to our weekly newsletter.

WATCH OUR SMWLA 2019 PROMO

The post Digital Storytelling: Simple and Effective Ways to Create the Right Perspective for Your Business from Leo Burnett appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/05/digital-storytelling-simple-and-effective-ways-to-create-the-right-perspective-for-your-business-from-leo-burnett/

Digital Storytelling: Simple and Effective Ways to Create the Right Perspective for Your Business from Leo Burnett

For leading brands today, connection is key to a successful advertising campaign. If consumers feel they have a relationship with a business, then they will invest and make it their own – most probably for life.

During #SMWNYC representatives from some of the world’s leading brands including Johnson & Johnson, Leo Burnett, Diageo, and EquityProjectForAll came together to discuss their tactics for winning the hearts and minds of consumers with stories that penetrate and reverberate long after the campaign is done.

Join SMW Insider to watch this #SMWNYC session

Subscribe

Leveraging stories behind brands that have transformed their marketing techniques, the panelists identified ways to craft social content based on platform, audience, and campaign objective, how to integrate brand purpose authentically into social strategies, and ways to amplify your brand’s story through VR, AR, and AI to fuel engagement.

Here are three simple but effective perspectives shared during the conversation.

Do the research and create meaning.

Karuna Rawal and the #AlwaysLikeAGirl Campaign by Always.

The clever campaign shows various demographics in America being asked to do something like a girl.

All give accurate imitations of what society implies girls to do – running with arms waving – fighting with eyes closed – throwing with their wrists flared.

It highlights the female cliché and generates the perspective of the women; their audience.

“We found out through the data that typically, women lose their confidence as a result of puberty,” said Karuna Rawal, President, Groupe Client Lead, Leo Burnett.

The advert then asks females aged between 7 and 11 to do something like a girl. At this point, the young girls fight with as tough as they physically can; run as fast as they physically can; and throw like as hard as they physically can, expressing courageous confidence.

“We had the opportunity to connect with our purpose – empowering women – while bringing it together with the data – how girls confidence plummets through puberty,” added Rawal.

It just goes to show how successful a campaign can be by connecting with the perspective of the consumer.

Rawal described how women grew tired of seeing a product demonstrated to them as a way of getting them to invest.

Don’t be fake.

Neutrogena pioneered the use of the no-retouch image to show how effective their product is.

Paired with partnerships with selected celebrity, Neutrogena could leverage its brand identity to generate effective results.

By showing the perspective of their consumer through the gaze of celebrity, it generated an appeal that their consumer could trust.

The secret was in confronting what was already known.

“The goal was to really leverage our purpose and speak it through our advertising campaign” said Edlynne Laryea, Director, Global Neutrogena Digital Transformation and Sustainability, Johnson & Johnson.

If consumers know that what they see being advertised on television is a lie, then that insult isn’t going to translate into sales.

This ethos was put to the test in Neutrogena’s Valentine’s Day campaign where two actors without a script simply had some fun with the product. Simple, but effective.

“It was really important for us to tell an authentic story without any pretense. They weren’t holding up the bottle or saying use Neutrogena,” explained Laryea.

The Honest Story.

How does a Russian sounding vodka appeal to the US? By telling the honest story.

“In the US the perception is something we really have to work on,” said Jay Sethi, Vice President, Smirnoff & Nurture Brands Portfolio, Diageo.

The man behind the infamous Smirnoff ad ‘Made in America: but we’d be happy to talk about Russia under oath.’

Brands, especially old brands like Smirnoff, have long histories. More often than not, this can be great for companies – American brands emphasis their Americanness in the act of patriotism; and why not?

For Smirnoff however, history wasn’t in their favor, or at least for the time being.

Smirnoff was an American company with a Russian name – as a result of American immigration Smirnoff has a Russian name. Their history pointed out that only the affluent drank Smirnoff in Russia and they wanted to keep it that way.

“Russia just wanted Smirnoff to be for them, they wanted it to be for the Tsar’s, it was the best Vodka you could have, and they wanted it for themselves. Our founders said we want it to be for the people,” explained Sethi.

Telling the story of how Smirnoff was created in America because Russia opposed their distribution, creates a positive perspective for the American consumer and flips what was first thought of as a negative history, into a promising one.

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The post Digital Storytelling: Simple and Effective Ways to Create the Right Perspective for Your Business from Leo Burnett appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/05/digital-storytelling-simple-and-effective-ways-to-create-the-right-perspective-for-your-business-from-leo-burnett/

Mastering Social Media the Spectacular Way

A critical part of advertising, social media facilitates the ability for a brand to reach millions of customers globally if it is done right.

After nine years of building social media accounts from zero to millions of followers, for over 100 celebrity clients, Entertainer and Adwizar CEO, Spectacular Smith, knows a thing or two about the steps and tools necessary to perform well with social media.

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He discussed the strategies he tested with different accounts, how he found a system for monetizing a following, and why he believes they can be useful to anyone looking to do the same.

Not a traditional Marketer

Adwizar was a spinoff project for Spectacular, starting off on Twitter while he was on tour in 2009. He essentially discovered that he could make money from tweeting and that he was good at it.

Spectacular began selling advertising that could garner high social media traffic by first building a large following. “Building a massive following, you’re able to post a link and [people] click on it and advertising will be on the website, and you actually make money off of that,” Spectacular explained.

Though this may sound like common practice in the present day, what is different for this marketer that he was not just tweeting about a specific product.

Instead, Spectacular was using a strategy in which he figured what the sentiment behind a given account was and what the audience would be like, as a result.

Figuring out what type of content strikes the emotion of an actual person who is following [your account]. If it makes somebody cry, if it makes somebody laugh, it will make somebody want to re-share what you have. I focused on content like that,” he said.

Once he mastered that, he explained, he was able to make pages go viral, earning him the moniker “The Godfather of Influence” and eventually allowing him to work on celebrities’ social media presence.

Momentum is still important

Although Spectacular has finessed modern-day marketing strategies, he touched on things that are still beneficial within marketing, albeit traditional.

When he began selling tangible product, he still used social media as an element of the marketing.

Spectacular said he started off with relatively well-known influencers and asked (and paid) them to hype a product up.

But after time, people were wearing it and he no longer had to pay them as they wanted to keep up with the trend.

“Start from smaller tiers,” he said, noting that word of mouth still helps.

It was that technique that has allowed Spectacular to sell over 1.2 million within the first 30 days of launching a given product from scratch.

In the present day, Adwizar is a service-based company that can set a client up with a social media team to break down content, analyze it, report back, and set up a personalized strategy “from 90 days out” to help replicate Spectacular’s past results.

What are the requirements to work with Adwizar?

“Believe in your product. We have to know that we mesh as a team. It has to be a win win win for everybody,” he said.

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The post Mastering Social Media the Spectacular Way appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/05/mastering-social-media-the-spectacular-way/