Facebook and LinkedIn Join the SMWLDN Lineup

Social Media Week London 2018 is fast approaching, and we’re continuing to bolster the lineup with incredible speakers and panelists to discuss new ideas, trends, and innovations in social media, publishing, and marketing.

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This week alone we’re announcing two new events, hosted by two of the biggest platforms in the industry: Facebook and LinkedIn.

  • On Thursday, November 15 at 12 p.m., Dan Robinson, Group Director at Facebook will host a talk called “Easy Come, Easy Go: The Disruption of Loyalty.” Robinson, who has been with Facebook for the last 6+ years, is uniquely suited to discuss how the future of loyalty between consumers, brands, and platforms is contingent upon meaningful interactions between all parties.
  • On Friday, November 16 at 12 p.m., Jason Miller, the Global Content Marketing Leader at LinkedIn will delve into marketing across the entire funnel with “How LinkedIn Uses LinkedIn For Marketing.” Miller has years of firsthand knowledge on how to reach and engage customers with native advertising, paid and organic content, and creative, practical use of video—and he promises to share best practices with attendees.

These are just two of the featured speakers we’ll have at #SMWLDN this year, representing BBC Radio, Dataminr, Reddit, and many more. Check out the full list of speakers.

In its ninth year, Social Media Week London will run from November 14-16, 2018 at the QEII Centre. Have you gotten your passes yet?

Get your tickets now and save over £100 on the Premium or Standard Passes over the walkup price!

Learn the latest trends, insights and best practices from the brightest minds in media and technology. Sign up for SMW Insider to watch full-length sessions from official Social Media Week conferences live and on-demand.

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5 Reasons Why You Shouldn’t Buy Fake Followers

Big follower numbers on social media look impressive. To achieve that goal, many people turn to fake followers, which are imprecisely referred to as bots.

If you’re growing frustrated with a client who only cares about followers and likes, you may be tempted to pay for fake followers. After all, even if you actively fight against bots and report them, there’s no way to remove every fake account that follows you. Why not take advantage of this inherent flaw for your advantage?

Actively courting fake followers may give you a hollow short-term gain, but it’s one that means nothing to those who know not to rely on an easily manipulated metric.

Theoretically, having tons of followers means that people are interested in your brand and having a massive following will make your following grow event bigger by giving your page more exposure.

In reality, that may have been the case at one point, but it hasn’t been the case for a long time. It’s been said a million times, but it’s worth repeating: organic reach is almost non-existent, especially for those who don’t already follow your brand. Additionally, the fact that followers can be bought isn’t a secret.

Consumers are getting savvier. While it may make sense for Wendy’s to have over 2.7 million Twitter followers and over 8.5 million likes on Facebook, it would be suspicious for a small mom-and-pop restaurant to get anywhere near those numbers under almost all circumstances.

Here are five reasons why you shouldn’t invest in fake followers.

1. Your followers are a reflection on your content quality.

Many social media users will go through your followers to see who you attract and make sure your account is legitimate. If you aren’t one to follow many accounts, this may be the starting point for your followers find other businesses and people who provide similar or complementary content to what you provide.

Those who are interested in your brand and go through your followers will become suspicious if you have too many accounts that look sketchy or are obviously bots set up for the sole purpose of sharing other people’s content.

While you may gamble on the fact that not many people care about your followers, word gets around on the internet and you will be watched.

2. Buying fake followers will get you banned.

Is temporary success worth the risk of permanent expulsion from your chosen social media platforms?

Purchasing fake followers is the digital media equivalent of an athlete taking steroids. You may get caught in hindsight, but when your shady practices catch up with you there will be significant blowback.

As of May 2018, Facebook had closed 583 million fake profiles. In July 2018, The Washington Post reported Twitter had suspended 70 million suspected fakes. It’s only a matter of time before the social media platforms more aggressively pursue those who have an unusually large number of fake followers.

Citing the fact that this practice is widespread or that “everyone else is doing it” will only make things worse. It didn’t work with your mother, it doesn’t work when someone breaks the law, and it won’t win you any fans.

3. Followers/Likes matter less than they used to.

We all love the validation that seeing a new follower gives, but the harsh reality is that a simple follow means nothing. Engagement is what we need to focus on. It’s more important to have 100 engaged followers than 500,000 that you purchased from a click farm.

4. It dilutes the accuracy of your analytics.

If you bought a million followers, but only 1,000 are legitimate and respond to your posts, you have an engagement rate of 0.1 percent. That’s significantly less impressive and shows the pointlessness in bragging about following size.

In contrast, a company that has 1,000 followers and has 200 engaged users has an engagement rate of 20 percent. While these numbers would be extremely low for an international or national brand, they are actually pretty good numbers for a local business.

5. It’s a waste of money.

You’re better of spending potential bot money elsewhere. Sure, there are websites that lure you with promises of thousands of followers for a small fee. However, are you willing to use a perfectly good 20 dollars for an imaginary temporary victory?

There’s no good reason to buy fake followers. You may get a dopamine rush from your increasing follower count, but fake followers are nothing more than buying an award to show off because you didn’t want to take the time or effort to earn it yourself. It may take a while for people to catch on, but once they find out you will lose all credibility and end up digging yourself out of a hole of your own making.

 

Learn the latest trends, insights and best practices from the brightest minds in media and technology. Sign up for SMW Insider to watch full-length sessions from official Social Media Week conferences live and on-demand.

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People Say They’re Deleting Facebook, But Are They Really?

A recent poll shows that a good number of people, especially young people, are joining the #DeleteFacebook app from their phone. But here’s why no one, from Facebook to marketers to grandmothers who just figured out how Facebook works, should be worried.

According to the Pew Research Center, about 26 percent of polled adults said they’d deleted the Facebook app from their phone in the past year. Additionally, 42 percent said they’d taken a weeks-long break from the social media giant.

Young people in particular—18-29-year-olds—were much more likely to have deleted the app, which sounds like a problem for future growth.

And yet Facebook’s daily active user base has been steady at around 185 million for the last four quarters.

This is a good time to remind you that a poll, even one conducted by a prestigious organization like Pew Research, doesn’t always accurately reflect reality.

For one thing, the poll doesn’t check to see if users actually deleted Facebook’s app from their phone. We’re simply taking people’s word for it; Facebook, meanwhile, has hard numbers to back up their data. Pew also might not be able to take into account people they polled who deleted the app, then downloaded it again.

It’s also possible that people are continuing to join Facebook at around the same rate that users might be leaving it.

Finally, keep in mind that people who delete the app from their phone are by no means necessarily not using Facebook. They can still access the site from a desktop, or visit Facebook directly from the browsers on their phone. The site may not run as smoothly on an iPhone or Android device’s browser, but the mobile version is perfectly usable.

Facebook’s slowing user base growth is an issue for the platform, and Mark Zuckerberg’s company has had to make major changes after scandals relating to privacy and Russian influence in the 2016 election shook the public’s faith. But a supposed quarter of users “deleting” the app from their phone is not an outsized problem.

For marketers, the biggest dilemma isn’t that they don’t have enough potential users on Facebook to view their content—it’s getting their content seen above the rest in the wake of the recent algorithm shakeup.

Learn the latest trends, insights and best practices from the brightest minds in media and technology. Sign up for SMW Insider to watch full-length sessions from official Social Media Week conferences live and on-demand.

The post People Say They’re Deleting Facebook, But Are They Really? appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2018/09/people-say-theyre-deleting-facebook-but-are-they-really/

People Say They’re Deleting Facebook, But Are They Really?

A recent poll shows that a good number of people, especially young people, are joining the #DeleteFacebook app from their phone. But here’s why no one, from Facebook to marketers to grandmothers who just figured out how Facebook works, should be worried.

According to the Pew Research Center, about 26 percent of polled adults said they’d deleted the Facebook app from their phone in the past year. Additionally, 42 percent said they’d taken a weeks-long break from the social media giant.

Young people in particular—18-29-year-olds—were much more likely to have deleted the app, which sounds like a problem for future growth.

And yet Facebook’s daily active user base has been steady at around 185 million for the last four quarters.

This is a good time to remind you that a poll, even one conducted by a prestigious organization like Pew Research, doesn’t always accurately reflect reality.

For one thing, the poll doesn’t check to see if users actually deleted Facebook’s app from their phone. We’re simply taking people’s word for it; Facebook, meanwhile, has hard numbers to back up their data. Pew also might not be able to take into account people they polled who deleted the app, then downloaded it again.

It’s also possible that people are continuing to join Facebook at around the same rate that users might be leaving it.

Finally, keep in mind that people who delete the app from their phone are by no means necessarily not using Facebook. They can still access the site from a desktop, or visit Facebook directly from the browsers on their phone. The site may not run as smoothly on an iPhone or Android device’s browser, but the mobile version is perfectly usable.

Facebook’s slowing user base growth is an issue for the platform, and Mark Zuckerberg’s company has had to make major changes after scandals relating to privacy and Russian influence in the 2016 election shook the public’s faith. But a supposed quarter of users “deleting” the app from their phone is not an outsized problem.

For marketers, the biggest dilemma isn’t that they don’t have enough potential users on Facebook to view their content—it’s getting their content seen above the rest in the wake of the recent algorithm shakeup.

Learn the latest trends, insights and best practices from the brightest minds in media and technology. Sign up for SMW Insider to watch full-length sessions from official Social Media Week conferences live and on-demand.

The post People Say They’re Deleting Facebook, But Are They Really? appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2018/09/people-say-theyre-deleting-facebook-but-are-they-really/

Best & Worst times to post on Social Media – #SocialMedia #Infographic

Here are the best and worst times to post on social media including Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest and LinkedIn.

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How Does Facebook’s News Feed Work Now?

According to a recent Pew Research Center survey, more than half of American adults don’t understand why certain posts appear in their Facebook news feed.

This report drops on the heels of Facebook tweaking its algorithm to prioritize “meaningful interactions,” meaning fewer posts from brands and more posts from friends should appear on users’ feeds.

It also underpins the reality that, while millions of Americans and billions of people worldwide use Facebook, many of them don’t feel they have control over what content they’re seeing.

The numbers: People who don’t understand the feed

If you feel confused about what Facebook is showing you on any given day, you’re not alone. Pew’s survey shows that 53 percent of U.S. adults don’t understand why certain posts are included in their feed, with 20 percent saying they do not understand the feed “at all well.”

Not surprisingly, the older the polled user is, the less likely they are to understand Facebook’s news feed, or that they have some control over what content appears more or less frequently.

But confusion isn’t just an older person’s game here: 41 percent of users ages 18 to 29 say they don’t have a good understanding of the feed.

So how does the feed work?

Adam Mosseri, Facebook’s former head of news feed, spent much of the past year trying to explain the feed’s ranking system to users, publishers, and anyone who engages him.

Mosseri is now head of product at Instagram, but he was once described as the “only Facebook exec anybody can stand talking to because he seems not to lie all the time.” So when he explains the algorithm, you can believe it.

Here’s how Mosseri broke down the news feed ranking system in a video released by Facebook last year:

Facebook uses a tool called ranking: “Ranking is a set of algorithms we use to try to assess people are in each and every story they can see on Facebook,” he says.

Facebook’s algorithm essentially estimates the likelihood that you’ll engage with a post. It involves combining four steps:

  • Inventory: The “menu” of Facebook, which is the collection of posts you have not seen from your friends or the pages you follow.
  • Signals: Information Facebook has such as how old the post is, who posted it, or how fast your current internet connection is or what device you’re using.
  • Predictions: Facebook uses signals to predict how likely you are to comment, share, or hide a story.
  • Relevancy: The final step is to weigh predictions and roll them up into a relevancy score—a number that represents how likely you will be interested in a given story. Stories are ordered in the news feed by those scores.

Mosseri also mentions that recency is an important but not all-important signal, which is why Facebook is “lightly chronological.”

Today, the inventory that Facebook is selecting stories from has more posts from friends than businesses. Marketers will need to study how to hurdle over competitors in order to win the limited space available to them.

And if your brand’s content does show up in people’s news feed organically, it’s because that content is highly relevant to them. Conversely, if you see a brand’s content in your feed, maybe that content is closer to your heart than you imagined.

Learn the latest trends, insights and best practices from the brightest minds in media and technology. Sign up for SMW Insider to watch full-length sessions from official Social Media Week conferences live and on-demand.

The post How Does Facebook’s News Feed Work Now? appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2018/09/how-does-facebooks-news-feed-work-now/

The Complete Guide To Facebook Groups

We’re all part of Facebook groups. Sometimes we’re active members. Other times we join a group and never look at it again. It’s the one part of Facebook that lets us meet people with similar interests and establish a community outside of physical boundaries around a specific topic, geographic area, or both.

On a social media platform that is increasingly pay-to-play, groups are the one aspect of Facebook that the company hasn’t monetized yet. (Facebook has tested fees for subscription-based groups, so it’s only a matter of time before it’s implemented.) Currently, this doesn’t affect many groups.

Why Would I Consider a Facebook Group for My Brand?

A Facebook group will help you identify your core group of fans and cultivate a mutually beneficial relationship with them. Bands, such as Tsunami Bomb with its Tsunami Bomb Squad, are particularly adept at providing safe spaces for fans to share stories and memorabilia.

Facebook groups give brands a faithful captive audience that ideally will interact and provide feedback on what it loves about your brand, things it doesn’t like, and ways to improve your brand. Another perk is that often Facebook will alert active members that there is a new post.

If your brand is big enough, such as Fender guitars, there may be a fan group already dedicated to your brand.

If you find a fan group, don’t hijack it for your own purposes. It’s wiser to let it be. The last thing you want to do is anger your biggest fans. However, you can start a group associated with your Page that gives fans things they can’t get from other fans. These can be special offers, exclusive Q&As, or contests. Your imagination and budget are the only limits.

Is a Facebook Group Right for My Brand?

It’s important to note that Facebook groups don’t work for every brand. A local ice cream shop isn’t going to find a Facebook group sustainable unless it sponsors a group dedicate to the town it’s located in. However, a personal trainer will because there is the possibility her business will grow outside a specific geographic area. She will also always have new exercises and diet tips to share, whereas the ice cream shop only has so much material to work with.

How Should I Manage My Facebook Group?

There are some basic guidelines every Facebook group should establish.

1. Establish Who You Are
Facebook allows you to choose your group name and post an “About.” Choose a relevant name that is easy to find and make good use of the “About” section.

Answer the following questions:

  • Who would be interested in your group?
  • What can members expect from the group?
  • Are there any perks group members get, such as exclusive coupons or previews?
  • Why would people want to join this group?

2. Make Your Rules Clear

Most groups with stringent guidelines pin a post with details of what is allowed and will get a member banned. Usually, these are fairly straightforward, such as don’t abuse other members or sell in the group.

3. Decide Who Should Be Able to Join

You don’t want your group to be overrun with spammers, which is why you need to establish some form of gatekeeping.

Facebook makes this easy. You can ask potential members up to 3 questions as to why they want to join and what they plan to contribute. If you find that questions take away from the spirit of the group, you can allow everyone to join and booting the disruptive members.

Another way is to only allow members who are paying to be in the group. This only works for organizations or programs that charge fees. For example, Toastmasters International maintains private groups only accessible to those in the organization and the band Icon For Hire’s Icon Army Headquarters is for the band’s Patreon subscribers only.

While Facebook groups won’t work for everyone, there’s nothing stopping you from experimenting with them. As long as you’re willing to show fans you care and let them be honest in a closed environment you have control over, you will find Facebook groups can be very rewarding.

Learn the latest trends, insights and best practices from the brightest minds in media and technology. Sign up for SMW Insider to watch full-length sessions from official Social Media Week conferences live and on-demand.

The post The Complete Guide To Facebook Groups appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2018/08/the-complete-guide-to-facebook-groups/

Why You Should Care About Facebook’s Voice Assistant Project

It may seem like every tech company out there has a voice assistant who is ready to help you check the weather, buy laundry detergent, or start your playlist. Siri, Alexa, Cortana—who else can help us live our lives?

One major company is conspicuously absent from the voice assistant game: Facebook. But thanks to some wonderful work by engineer Jane Manchun Wong, the world now has a glimpse into Facebook’s “Aloha,” a prototype interface for speech recognition functionality.

Aloha would form the basis of any future Facebook home speaker, as well as potentially power transcription technology that would help FB users communicate across various media.

Facebook’s foray into the speech recognition world may seem like just another way for a tech giant to sell you some hardware or get you to download software. But here’s why Facebook’s Aloha (which, if we had to guess, will not be called Aloha when it debuts—too similar to Alexa) is so crucial to the social network’s plans.

Search is going vocal

Just as the internet has moved from mostly text-based pages to sites featuring lots of multimedia, namely video content, it’s also moving to utilize voice more than ever.

ComScore projects that 50 percent of all searches will be voice searches by 2020—and Forbes adds to that prediction by noting that voice searches “tend to be more action-based” than text searches, meaning that when someone does a voice search, they’re looking to actually make moves, such as purchase something.

In order for Facebook to keep pace with its competitors in the space for people’s attention, they’ll need technology, and perhaps even hardware, that meets this new criteria for action.

Facebook’s version will likely have a special twist

How you act on Facebook—interacting with your friends and family—is no doubt different than how you interact with Google and Amazon, and by extension, their assistants. Facebook’s voice recognition technology will take that into account.

Michael Lewis, a creative strategist at the Active Web Group, says that Aloha is being developed as “a more social version” of better known AI.

“Aloha will be designed to integrate with Facebook Messenger and pick up various tones, slangs, and dialects to better understand how people normally communicate. So as opposed to AI making users annunciation words, Aloha will adapt to user behavior,” Lewis says.

That’s a game-changer for marketers, who will then be able to mine more organic communication to better understand their customers, Lewis adds. This new information source will help them surface trends and create viral content faster and more effectively than ever.

An even greater UX experience

Of course, Facebook will posit Aloha as a way to smooth the customer experience—which, assuming we all gravitate towards voice search anyway, it will. But within that smoothing is a win for marketers: Aloha, says Lewis, could help marketers “monitor engagement and utilize personalization for early sales funnel stages to increase customer retention.”

Customers that are catered to more personally, better engaged, and better served? It’s literally a win for all sides, and that’s no doubt a huge reason why Facebook is journeying down this well-traveled road.

Learn the latest trends, insights and best practices from the brightest minds in media and technology. Sign up for SMW Insider to watch full-length sessions from official Social Media Week conferences live and on-demand.

The post Why You Should Care About Facebook’s Voice Assistant Project appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2018/08/why-you-should-care-about-facebooks-voice-assistant-project/

Facebook Will Speak On Community + Responsibility At SMWLDN

We have an incredibly exciting addition to the SMWLDN lineup to announce.

Ian Edwards, the Planning Director for Northern Europe at Facebook, will speak to attendees at the QEII Centre in London. The title of his talk: “Community, Opportunity, and Responsibility.”

Not only is Ian an engaging speaker and accomplished in his own right, but the topic is perhaps one of the most central and pressing issue in social media today. Namely, do social networks like Facebook and Instagram have a responsibility to their users—individuals, brands, organizations—to create and regulate communities and opportunities? In this era of widespread misinformation, where does the role of the platform end and the user begin?

Some of the questions he is slated to discuss include:

  • What are the challenges and opportunities that await us as social media evolves?
  • What roles will Facebook and Instagram play in this ongoing process?
  • How will businesses and brands continue to grow in these untested waters?

As Facebook’s Planning Director over the last 3+ years, Mr. Edwards has specifically focused on helping brands and agencies get the most value from Facebook. Prior to his time at Facebook, he spent 14 years as head of strategy and comms planner for a number of London’s biggest agencies, including Vizeum and Mediaedge:CIA.

This is obviously a huge update to the Social Media Week—London 2018 lineup. And this announcement happens to coincide with the near-end of our 20% off sale.

You still have time: The sale ends tomorrow, Friday, Aug. 24. Buy your ticket now and ensure you’ll be in the seats for when Mr. Edwards takes the stage on Wednesday, Nov. 14. You’ll also have access to more than 60+ events, installations, and more perks, including membership to SMW Insider.

Learn the latest trends, insights and best practices from the brightest minds in media and technology. Sign up for SMW Insider to watch full-length sessions from official Social Media Week conferences live and on-demand.

The post Facebook Will Speak On Community + Responsibility At SMWLDN appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2018/08/facebook-will-speak-on-community-responsibility-at-smwldn/

Why Brands Are Posting Way More Content To Facebook

In the second quarter of 2018, the top 20,000 pages on Facebook posted an incredible 8.1 million times, up 24 percent from the first quarter.

That’s according to analysis from a joint Buffer-BuzzSumo report, which analyzed 43 million Facebook posts to see how brands are performing on the platform this year.

It seems that in response to Facebook’s decision to emphasize person-to-person over Page-to-person interactions on News Feeds, brands are throwing as much content as possible against the Facebook wall to see what sticks.

So far, results—at least from an engagement perspective—are underwhelming.

Brands are flooding Facebook with way more content

Although there’s always been debate about this, the general rule of thumb has been that more posts and more content lead to more engagement.

So when brands were told that each post would get less reach in this new era of Facebook, they began to create even more content to compensate: According to Buffer, the world’s top brands posted nearly 20,000 more pieces of content every day in Q2 2018 than they did in Q1 2017.

While most pages put up new content a handful of times a day, some are hitting the Post button as much as 80 times in a 24 hour period, according to Facebook.

And yet: engagement is down across the board

Buffer’s research shows that overall page engagement is down 50 percent over the last 18 months, and individual post engagement is down a whopping 65 percent.

It doesn’t matter what pages are posting—engagement for images, videos, and links are all way down.

There are a few theories being floated as to why engagement is down, beyond a general reshuffling of what’s considered important by Facebook:

  • Increased competition: The News Feed is the same size it’s always been, which means only so many posts can populate the feed at once.
  • Improved content: The bar is higher than ever for putting out quality content, and only the best stuff will get the same traction that lower-grade content once did.
  • Ad content is being prioritized: Facebook is making an effort to feature paid advertisements in the feed more often, and that’s crowding out unpaid content.

How to find your brand’s sweet spot

If you’re worried that your business’s content is getting lost in the deluge, you may be right.

Buffer recommends an average of five posts per day, with a greater emphasis on the quality of each post, rather than a larger quantity, to make sure you’re getting the most ROI for everything you produce.

Also, keep in mind that images primarily perform better than video at this point, and both do better than simple links to other sites. Your content should also be mobile-optimized and speak to your audience and their reasons for sharing.

If you’re still not getting traction, figuring out to how to create quality paid spots may be the way to go. There are more ways than ever to engage your audience with paid spots, particularly in long-form video.

Learn the latest trends, insights and best practices from the brightest minds in media and technology. Sign up for SMW Insider to watch full-length sessions from official Social Media Week conferences live and on-demand.

The post Why Brands Are Posting Way More Content To Facebook appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2018/08/why-brands-are-posting-way-more-content-to-facebook/