Category: SEO Tips

11 SEO Hacks Guaranteed to Deliver Impressive Results on Google [Infographic]

Ensure you’re maximizing your search opportunities with these SEO tips.

https://www.socialmediatoday.com/news/11-seo-hacks-guaranteed-to-deliver-impressive-results-on-google-infographi/574621/

Google’s 200+ Ranking Factors: The Complete List as of 2020

Google’s 200+ Ranking Factors: The Complete List as of 2020 🌍💼📰

http://mikearmstrong.me/googles-200-ranking-factors-the-complete-list-as-of-2020-%f0%9f%8c%8d%f0%9f%92%bc%f0%9f%93%b0/
— Read on mikearmstrong.me/googles-200-ranking-factors-the-complete-list-as-of-2020-🌍💼📰/

Google’s 200+ Ranking Factors: The Complete List as of 2020

Interesting Article on Google Search Engine Ranking Factors as of 2020. Great read for those looking for SEO Tips are ways to improve their websites’ internet page rankings:

You might already know that Google uses over 200 ranking factors in their search engine algorithm…

But what are they?

Well, you are in for a treat because I’ve put together a complete list.

Some Factors are proven.

Some Factors are controversial.

Others Factors are SEO speculation.

But they are all here.

And the search ranking factors were recently updated. The entire 200 Google Ranking Factors list is updated for 2020.

Let’s dive right in.

The 200 Google Search Engine Factors are split in to the following 10 Sections:

Domain SEO Factors
Page-Level SEO Factors
Site-Level SEO Factors
Backlink SEO Factors
User Interaction Factors
Special Google Algorithm Rules
Brand Signals
On-Site Webspam Factors
Off-Site Webspam Factors

Domain SEO Factors

1. Domain Age:

Google’s Matt Cutts states that:

“The difference between a domain that’s six months old versus one year old is really not that big at all.”
In other words, they do use domain age. But it’s not that important. There is much more of a difference between a domain that 10 years old versus one that is just 6 months old though.

2. Keyword Appears in Top Level Domain:

Having a keyword in your domain name doesn’t give you the SEO boost that it used to. But it still acts as a relevancy signal for your page SEO.

3. Keyword As First Word in Domain:

A domain that starts with their target keyword has an SEO edge over sites that either don’t have that keyword in their domain (or have the keyword in the middle or end of their domain).

4. Domain registration length:

A Google patent states:

“Valuable (legitimate) domains are often paid for several years in advance, while doorway (illegitimate) domains rarely are used for more than a year. Therefore, the date when a domain expires in the future can be used as a factor in predicting the legitimacy of a domain.”

5. Keyword in Subdomain:

Moz’s SEO expert panel agrees that a keyword appearing in the subdomain of a website can boost your search engine rankings.

6. Domain History:

A site with volatile ownership or several drops may tell Google to “reset” the site’s history, negating links pointing to the domain. Or, in certain cases, a penalised domain may carry the penalty over to the new domain owner.

7. Exact Match Domain:

Exact Match Domains may still give you a slight SEO edge. But if your EMD happens to be a low-quality site, it’s vulnerable to the EMD update.

8. Public vs. Private WhoIs:

Private WhoIs information may be a sign of “something to hide”. Googler Matt Cutts is quoted as stating:

“…When I checked the whois on them, they all had “whois privacy protection service” on them. That’s relatively unusual. …Having whois privacy turned on isn’t automatically bad, but once you get several of these factors all together, you’re often talking about a very different type of webmaster than the fellow who just has a single site or so.”

9. Penalised WhoIs Owner:

If Google identifies a particular person as a spammer it makes sense that they would scrutinise other sites owned by that person.

10. Country TLD extension:

Having a Country Code Top Level Domain (.cn, .pt, .ca) can help the site rank for that particular country… but it can limit the site’s ability to rank globally.

Page-Level SEO Factors

11. Keyword in Title Tag:

Although not as important as it once was, your title tag remains an important on-page SEO ranking signal.

12. Title Tag Starts with Keyword:

According to Moz , title tags that starts with a keyword tend to perform better in search engine rankings than title tags with the keyword towards the end of the tag.

13. Keyword in Description Tag:

Google doesn’t use the meta description tag as a direct page ranking signal. However, your description tag can impact click-through-rate, which is a key SEO ranking factor.

14. Keyword Appears in H1 Tag (main page title):

H1 tags are a “second title tag”. Along with your title tag, Google uses your H1 tag as a secondary relevancy signal, according to results from one correlation study:

15. TF-IDF:

A fancy way of saying: “How often does a certain word appear in a document?”. The more often that word appears on a page, the more likely it is that the page is about that word. Google likely uses a sophisticated version of TF-IDF.

16. Content Length:

Content with more words can cover a wider breadth and are likely preferable in the algorithm compared to shorter, superficial articles. Indeed, one recent ranking factors industry study found that content length correlated with SERP position.

17. Table of Contents:

Using a linked table of contents can help Google better understand your page’s content. It can also result in sitelinks:

18. Keyword Density:

Although not as important as it once was, Google may use it to determine the topic of a webpage. But going overboard can hurt your Search Engine page ranking.

19. Latent Semantic Indexing Keywords in Content (LSI):

LSI keywords help search engines extract meaning from words that have more than one meaning (for example: Apple the computer company vs. Apple the fruit). The presence/absence of LSI probably also acts as a content quality signal.

20. LSI Keywords in Title and Description Tags:

As with webpage content, LSI keywords in page meta tags probably help Google discern between words with multiple potential meanings. May also act as a relevancy signal.

21. Page Covers Topic In-Depth:

There’s a known correlation between depth of topic coverage and Google rankings.

Therefore, pages that cover every angle likely have an edge vs. pages that only cover a topic partially.

22. Page Loading Speed via HTML:

Both Google and Bing use page speed as a ranking factor. Search engine spiders can estimate your site speed fairly accurately based on your page’s HTML code.

23. Page Loading Speed via Chrome:

Google also uses Chrome user data to get a better handle on a page’s loading time. That way, they can measure how quickly a page actually loads to users.

24. Use of AMP:

While not a direct Google ranking factor, AMP may be a requirement to rank in the mobile version of the Google News Carousel.

25. Entity Match:

Does a page’s content match the “entity” that a user is searching for? If so, that page may get a rankings boost for that keyword.

26. Google Hummingbird:

This “algorithm change” helped Google go beyond keywords. Thanks to Hummingbird, Google can now better understand the topic of a webpage.

27. Duplicate Content:

Identical content on the same site (even slightly modified) can negatively influence a site’s search engine visibility.

28. Rel=Canonical:

When used properly, use of this tag may prevent Google from penalising your site for duplicate content.

29. Image Optimisation:

Images send search engines important relevancy signals through their file name, alt text, title, description and caption. Not keyword describing your images can affect your page rank.

30. Content Recency:

Google Caffeine update favors recently published or updated content, especially for time-sensitive searches.

Highlighting this factor’s importance, Google shows the date of a page’s last update for certain pages:

31. Magnitude of Content Updates:

The significance of edits and changes also serves as a freshness factor.

Adding or removing entire sections is more significant than switching around the order of a few words or fixing a typo.

32. Historical Page Updates:

How often has the page been updated over time?

Daily, weekly, every 5 years? Frequency of page updates also play a role in freshness.

33. Keyword Prominence:

Having a keyword appear in the first 100 words of a page’s content is correlated to first page Google rankings.

34. Keyword in H2, H3 Tags:

Having your keyword appear as a subheading in H2 or H3 format may be another weak relevancy signal. In fact, Googler John Mueller states:

“These heading tags in HTML help us to understand the structure of the page.”

35. Outbound Link Quality:

Many SEOs think that linking out to authority sites helps send trust signals to Google. And this is backed up by a recent industry study.

36. Outbound Link Theme:

According to The Hillop Algorithm, Google may use the content of the pages you link to as a relevancy signal.

For example, if you have a page about cars that links to movie-related pages, this may tell Google that your page is about the movie Cars, not the automobile.

37. Grammar and Spelling:

Proper grammar and spelling is a quality signal, although Cutts gave mixed messages a few years back on whether or not this was important.

38. Syndicated Content:

Is the content on the page original? If it’s scraped or copied from an indexed page it won’t rank as well… or may not get indexed at all.

39. Mobile-Friendly Update:

Often referred to as “Mobilegeddon“, this update rewarded pages that were properly optimised for mobile devices.

40. Mobile Usability of your web content:

Websites that mobile users can easily use may have an edge in Google’s “Mobile-first Index”.

41. “Hidden” Content on Mobile: Hidden content on mobile devices may not get indexed (or may not be weighed as heavily) vs. fully visible content.

However, a Googler recently stated that hidden content is OK. But also said that in the same video, “…if it’s critical content it should be visible…”.

42. Helpful “Supplementary Content”:

According to a now-public Google Rater Guidelines Document, helpful supplementary content is an indicator of a page’s quality (and therefore, Google ranking).

Examples include currency converters, loan interest calculators and interactive recipes.

43. Content Hidden Behind Tabs on a web page:

Do users need to click on a tab to reveal some of the content on your page? If so, Google has said that this content “may not be indexed”.

44. Number of Outbound Links:

Too many dofollow OBLs can “leak” PageRank, which can hurt that page’s rankings.

45. Multimedia Content:

Images, videos and other multimedia elements may act as a content quality signal. For example, one industry study found a correlation between multimedia and rankings:

46. Number of Internal Links Pointing to Web Page:

The number of internal links to a page indicates its importance relative to other pages on the site (more internal links=more important).

47. Quality of Internal Links Pointing to a Web Page:

Internal links from authoritative pages on domain have a stronger effect than pages with no or low PageRank.

48. Broken Links:

Having too many broken links on a page may be a sign of a neglected or abandoned site. The Google Rater Guidelines Document uses broken links as one was to assess a homepage’s quality.

49. Reading Level:

There’s no doubt that Google estimates the reading level of webpages. In fact, Google used to give you reading level stats:

But what they do with that information is up for debate. Some say that a basic reading level will help you rank better because it will appeal to the masses. But others associate a basic reading level with content mills like Ezine Articles.

50. Affiliate Links:

Affiliate links themselves probably won’t hurt your rankings. But if you have too many, Google’s algorithm may pay closer attention to other quality signals to make sure you’re not a “thin affiliate site“.

51. HTML errors/W3C validation:

Lots of HTML errors or sloppy coding may be a sign of a poor quality site. While controversial, many in SEO think that a well-coded page is used as a quality signal.

52. Domain Authority:

All things being equal, a page on an authoritative domain will rank higher than a page on a domain with less authority.

53. Page’s PageRank:

Not perfectly correlated. But pages with lots of authority tend to outrank pages without much link authority.

54. URL Length:

Excessively long URLs may hurt a page’s search engine visibility.

In fact, several industry studies have found that short URLs tend to have a slight edge in Google’s search results.

55. URL Path:

A page closer to the homepage may get a slight authority boost vs. pages buried deep down in a site’s architecture.

56. Human Editors:

Although never confirmed, Google has filed a patent for a system that allows human editors to influence the SERPs.

57. Page Category:

The category the page appears on is a relevancy signal. A page that’s part of a closely related category may get a relevancy boost compared to a page that’s filed under an unrelated category.

58. WordPress Tags:

Tags are WordPress-specific relevancy signal. According to Yoast.com:

“The only way it improves your SEO is by relating one piece of content to another, and more specifically a group of posts to each other.”

59. Keyword in URL:

Another relevancy signal. A Google rep recently called this “a very small ranking factor“. But a ranking factor nontheless.

60. URL String:

The categories in the URL string are read by Google and may provide a thematic signal to what a page is about:

61. References and Sources:

Citing references and sources, like research papers do, may be a sign of quality. The Google Quality Guidelines states that reviewers should keep an eye out for sources when looking at certain pages:

“This is a topic where expertise and/or authoritative sources are important…”.

However, Google has denied that they use external links as a ranking signal.

62. Bullets and Numbered Lists:

Bullets and numbered lists help break up your content for readers, making them more user friendly.

Google likely agrees and may prefer content with bullets and numbers.

63. Priority of a Page in your web Sitemap:

The priority a page is given via the sitemap.xml file may influence the ranking of that page.

64. Too Many Outbound Links:

Straight from the aforementioned Quality rater document:

“Some pages have way, way too many links, obscuring the page and distracting from the Main Content.”

65. UX Signals From Other Keywords Page Ranks For:

If the page ranks for several other keywords, it may give Google an internal sign of quality.

In fact, Google’s recent “How Search Works” report states:

“We look for sites that many users seem to value for similar queries.”

66. Page Age:

Although Google prefers fresh content, an older page that’s regularly updated may outperform a newer page.

67. User Friendly Layout:

Citing the Google Quality Guidelines Document yet again:

“The page layout on highest quality pages makes the Main Content immediately visible.”

68. Parked Domains:

A Google update in December of 2011 decreased search visibility of parked domains.

69. Useful Content:

As pointed out by Backlinko reader Jared Carrizales, Google may distinguish between “quality” and “useful” content.

Site-Level Factors

70. Content Provides Value and Unique Insights:

Google has stated that they are happy to penalise websites that don’t bring anything new or useful to the table, especially thin affiliate sites.

71. Contact Us Page:

The aforementioned Google Quality Document states that they prefer sites with an “appropriate amount of contact information”. Make sure that your contact information matches your whois info.

72. Domain Trust/TrustRank: Many SEOs believe that “TrustRank” is a massively important ranking factor.

And a Google Patent titled “Search result ranking based on trust”, seems to back this up.

73. Site Architecture:

A well put-together site architecture (for example, a silo structure) helps Google thematically organise your content. It can also helps Googlebot access and index all of your site’s pages.

74. Site Updates:

Many SEOs believe that website updates — and especially when new content is added to the site — works a site-wide freshness factor.

Although Google has recently denied that they use “publishing frequency” in their algorithm.

75. Presence of Sitemap:

A sitemap helps search engines index your pages easier and more thoroughly, improving visibility.

However, Google recently stated that HTML sitemaps aren’t “useful” for SEO.

76. Site Uptime:

Lots of downtime from site maintenance or server issues may hurt your rankings (and can even result in deindexing if not corrected).

77. Server Location:

Server location influences where your site ranks in different geographical regions (source).

Especially important for geo-specific searches.

78. SSL Certificate: Google has confirmed that they use HTTPS as a ranking signal.

According to Google, however, HTTPS only acts as a “tiebreaker“.

79. Terms of Service and Privacy Pages:

These two pages help tell Google that a site is a trustworthy member of the internet. They may also help improve your site’s E-A-T.

80. Duplicate Meta Information On-Site:

Duplicate meta information across your site may bring down all of your page’s visibility.

81. Breadcrumb Navigation:

This is a style of user-friendly site-architecture that helps users (and search engines) know where they are on a site:

Google states that: “Google Search uses breadcrumb markup in the body of a web page to categorise the information from the page in search results.”

82. Mobile Optimised:

With more than half of all searches done from mobile devices, Google wants to see that your site is optimised for mobile users.

In fact, Google now penalises websites that aren’t mobile friendly.

83. YouTube:

There’s no doubt that YouTube videos are given preferential treatment in the SERPs (probably because Google owns it ):

In fact, Search Engine Land found that YouTube.com traffic increased significantly after Google Panda.

84. Site Usability:

A site that’s difficult to use or to navigate can hurt rankings indirectly by reducing time on site, pages viewed and bounce rate (in other words, RankBrain ranking factors).

85. Use of Google Analytics and Google Search Console:

Some think that having these two programs installed on your site can improve your page’s indexing. They may also directly influence rankings by giving Google more data to work with (ie. more accurate bounce rate, whether or not you get referral traffic from your backlinks etc.).

That said, Google has denied this as a myth.

86. User reviews/Site reputation:

A site’s reputation on sites like Yelp.com likely play an important role in Google’s algorithm. Google even posted a rarely candid outline of how they use online reviews after one site was caught ripping off customers in an effort to get press and links.

Backlink SEO Ranking Factors

87. Linking Domain Age:

Backlinks from aged domains may be more powerful than new domains.

88. # of Linking Root Domains:

The number of referring domains is one of the most important ranking factors in Google’s algorithm, as you can see from this industry study of 1 million Google Search results.

89. # of Links from Separate C-Class IPs:

Links from separate class-c IP addresses suggest a wider breadth of sites linking to you, which can help with rankings.

90. # of Linking Pages:

The total number of linking pages — even from the same domain — has an impact on rankings.

91. Backlink Anchor Text: As noted in this description of Google’s original algorithm:

“First, anchors often provide more accurate descriptions of web pages than the pages themselves.”

Obviously, anchor text is less important than before (and, when over-optimised, work as a webspam signal). But keyword-rich anchor text still sends a strong relevancy signal in small doses.

92. Alt Tag (for Image Links):

Alt text acts as anchor text for images.

93. Links from .edu or .gov Domains: Matt Cutts has stated that TLD doesn’t factor into a site’s importance. And Google has said they “ignore” lots of Edu links. However, that doesn’t stop SEOs from thinking that there’s a special place in the algorithm for .gov and .edu TLDs.

94. Authority of Linking Page:

The authority (PageRank) of the referring page has been an extremely important ranking factor since Google’s early days and still is.

95. Authority of Linking Domain:

The referring domain’s authority may play an independent role in a link’s value.

96. Links From Competitors:

Links from other pages ranking in the same SERP may be more valuable to a page’s ranking for that particular keyword.

97. Links from “Expected” Websites:

Although speculative, some SEOs believe that Google won’t fully trust your website until you get linked to from a set of “expected” sites in your industry.

98. Links from Bad Neighborhoods:

Links from so-called “bad neighborhoods” may hurt your site.

99. Guest Posts:

Although links from guest posts still pass value, they likely aren’t as powerful as true editorial links (plus, “large-scale” guest posting can get your site into trouble).

100. Links From Ads:

According to Google, links from ads should be nofollowed. However, it’s likely that Google is able to identify and filter out followed links from ads.

101. Homepage Authority:

Links to a referring page’s homepage may play special importance in evaluating a site’s — and therefore a link’s — weight.

102. Nofollow Links:

This is one of the most controversial topics in SEO. Google’s official word on the matter is:

“In general, we don’t follow them.”
Which suggests that they do… at least in certain cases. Having a certain % of nofollow links may also indicate a natural vs. unnatural link profile.

103. Diversity of Link Types:

Having an unnaturally large percentage of your links coming from a single source (ie. forum profiles, blog comments) may be a sign of webspam. On the other hand, links from diverse sources is a sign of a natural link profile.

104. “Sponsored” or “UGC” Tags:

Links tagged as “rel=sponsored” or “rel=UGC” are treated differently than normal “followed” or rel=nofollow links.

105. Contextual Links:

Links embedded inside a page’s content are considered more powerful than links on an empty page or found elsewhere on the page.

106. Excessive 301 Redirects to Page:

Backlinks coming from 301 redirects dilute some PageRank, according to a Webmaster Help Video.

107. Internal Link Anchor Text:

Internal link anchor text is another relevancy signal. That said, internal links likely have much less weight than anchor text coming from external sites.

108. Link Title Attribution:

The link title (the text that appears when you hover over a link) may also be used as a weak relevancy signal.

109. Country TLD of Referring Domain:

Getting links from country-specific top level domain extensions (.de, .cn, .co.uk) may help you rank better in that country.

110. Link Location In Content:

Links in the beginning of a piece of content may carry slightly more weight than links placed at the end of the content.

111. Link Location on Page:

Where a link appears on a page is important. Generally, a link embedded in a page’s content is more powerful than a link in the footer or sidebar area.

112. Linking Domain Relevancy:

A back link from a site in a similar niche is significantly more powerful than a link from a completely unrelated site.

113. Page-Level Relevancy:

A back link from a relevant page also passes more value.

114. Keyword in Title:

Google gives extra love to links from pages that contain your page’s keyword in the title (“Experts linking to experts”.)

115. Positive Link Velocity:

A site with positive link velocity usually gets a SERP boost as it shows your site is increasing in popularity.

116. Negative Link Velocity:

On the flip side, a negative link velocity can significantly reduce rankings as it’s a signal of decreasing popularity.

117. Links from “Hub” Pages:

The Hilltop Algorithm suggests that getting links from pages that are considered top resources (or hubs) on a certain topic are given special treatment.

118. Link from Authority Sites:

A link from a site considered an “authority site” likely pass more juice than a link from a small, relatively unknown site.

119. Linked to as Wikipedia Source:

Although the links are nofollow, many think that getting a link from Wikipedia gives you a little added trust and authority in the eyes of search engines.

120. Co-Occurrences:

The words that tend to appear around your backlinks helps tell Google what that page is about.

121. Backlink Age:

According to a Google patent, older links have more ranking power than newly minted backlinks.

122. Links from Real Sites vs. “Splogs”:

Due to the proliferation of blog networks, Google probably gives more weight to links coming from “real sites” than from fake blogs. They likely use brand and user-interaction signals to distinguish between the two.

123. Natural Link Profile:

A site with a “natural” link profile is going to rank highly and be more durable to updates than one that has obviously used black hat strategies to build links.

124. Reciprocal Links:

Google’s Link Schemes page lists “Excessive link exchanging” as a link scheme to avoid.

125. User Generated Content Links:

Google can identify UGC vs. content published by the actual site owner. For example, they know that a link from the official WordPress.com blog is very different than a link from besttoasterreviews.wordpress.com.

126. Links from 301:

Links from 301 redirects may lose a little bit of juice compared to a direct link. However, Matt Cutts says that a 301s are similar to direct links

127. Schema.org Usage:

Pages that support microformats may rank above pages without it. This may be a direct boost or the fact that pages with microformatting have a higher SERP CTR:

128. TrustRank of Linking Site:

The trustworthiness of the site linking to you determines how much “TrustRank” gets passed on to you.

129. Number of Outbound Links on a Web Page:

PageRank is finite. A link on a page with hundreds of external links passes less PageRank than a page with a handful of outbound links.

130. Forum Links:

Because of industrial-level spamming, Google may significantly devalue links from forums.

131. Word Count of Linking Content:

A link from a 1000-word post is usually more valuable than a link inside of a 25-word snippet.

132. Quality of Linking Content:

Links from poorly written or spun content don’t pass as much value as links from well-written, content.

133. Sitewide Links:

Matt Cutts has confirmed that sitewide links are “compressed” to count as a single link.

User Interaction Ranking Factors

134. RankBrain:

RankBrain is Google’s AI algorithm. Many believe that its main purpose is to measure how users interact with the search results (and rank the results accordingly).

135. Organic Click Through Rate for a Keyword:

According to Google, pages that get clicked more in CTR may get a SERP boost for that particular keyword.

136. Organic CTR for All Keywords:

A site’s organic CTR for all keywords it ranks for may be a human-based, user interaction signal (in other words, a “Quality Score” for the organic results).

137. Website Bounce Rate:

Not everyone in SEO agrees bounce rate matters, but it may be a way of Google to use their users as quality testers (after all, pages with a high bounce rate probably aren’t a great result for that keyword). Also, a recent study by SEMRush found a correlation between bounce rate and Google rankings.

138. Direct Web Traffic:

It’s confirmed that Google uses data from Google Chrome to determine how many people visit site (and how often). Sites with lots of direct traffic are likely higher quality sites vs. sites that get very little direct traffic. In fact, the SEMRush study I just cited found a significant correlation between direct traffic and Google rankings.

139. Repeat Website Traffic:

Websites with repeat visitors may get a Google ranking boost.

140. Pogosticking:

“Pogosticking” is a special type of bounce. In this case, the user clicks on other search results in an attempt to find the answer to their query.

Results that people Pogostick from may get a significantly rankings drop.

141. Blocked Sites:

Google has discontinued this feature in Chrome. However, Panda used this feature as a quality signal. So Google may still use a variation of it.

142. Chrome Bookmarks:

We know that Google collects Chrome browser usage data. Pages that get bookmarked in Chrome might get a boost.

143. Number of Comments:

Pages with lots of comments may be a signal of user-interaction and quality. In fact, one Googler said comments can help “a lot” with rankings.

144. Dwell Time:

Google pays very close attention to “dwell time“: how long people spend on your page when coming from a Google search.

This is also sometimes referred to as “long clicks vs short clicks”. In short: Google measures how long Google searchers spend on your page. The longer time spent, the better.

Special Google Algorithm Rules

145. Query Deserves Freshness:

Google gives newer pages a boost for certain searches.

146. Query Deserves Diversity:

Google may add diversity to a SERP for ambiguous keywords, such as “Ted”, “WWF” or “ruby”.

147. User Browsing History:

You’ve probably noticed this yourself: websites that you visit frequently get a SERP b oost for your searches.

148. User Search History:

Search chain influence search results for later searches.

For example, if you search for “reviews” then search for “toasters”, Google is more likely to rank toaster review sites higher in the SERPs.

149. Featured Snippets:

According to an SEMRush study, Google chooses Featured Snippets content based on a combination of content length, formatting, page authority and HTTPs usage.

150. Geo Targeting:

Google gives preference to sites with a local server IP and country-specific domain name extension.

151. Safe Search:

Search results with curse words or adult content won’t appear for people with Safe Search turned on.

152. Google+ Circles:

Even though Google+ is soon to be dead, Google still shows higher results for authors and sites that you’ve added to your Google Plus Circles.

153. “YMYL” Keywords:

Google has higher content quality standards for “Your Money or Your Life” keywords.

154. DMCA Complaints:

Google “downranks” pages with legitimate DMCA complaints.

155. Domain Diversity:

The so-called “Bigfoot Update” supposedly added more domains to each SERP page.

156. Transactional Searches:

Google sometimes displays different results for shopping-related keywords, like flight searches.

157. Local Searches:

For local searches, Google often places local results above the “normal” organic SERPs.

158. Top Stories box:

Certain keywords trigger a Top Stories box:

159. Big Brand Preference:

After the Vince Update, Google began giving big brands a boost for certain keywords.

160. Shopping Results:

Google sometimes displays Google Shopping results in organic SERPs:

161. Image Results:

Google images sometimes appear in the normal, organic search results.

162. Easter Egg Results:

Google has a dozen or so Easter Egg results. For example, when you search for “Atari Breakout” in Google image search, the search results turn into a playable game (!). Shout out to Victor Pan for this one.

163. Single Site Results for Brands:

Domain or brand-oriented keywords bring up several results from the same site.

164. Payday Loans Update:

This is a special algorithm designed to clean up “very spammy queries“.

Brand Signals

165. Brand Name Anchor Text:

Branded anchor text is a simple — but strong — brand signal.

166. Branded Searches:

People search for brands. If people search for your brand in Google, this shows Google that your site is a real brand.

167. Brand + Keyword Searches:

Do people search for a specific keyword along with your brand (for example: “Backlinko Google ranking factors” or “Backlinko SEO”)? If so, Google may give you a rankings boost when people search for the non-branded version of that keyword in Google.

168. Website Has Facebook Page and Likes:

Brands tend to have Facebook pages with lots of likes.

169. Website has Twitter Profile with Followers:

Twitter profiles with a lot of followers signals a popular brand.

170. Official Linkedin Company Page:

Most real businesses have company Linkedin pages.

171. Known Authorship:

In February 2013, Google CEO Eric Schmidt famously claimed:

“Within search results, information tied to verified online profiles will be ranked higher than content without such verification, which will result in most users naturally clicking on the top (verified) results.”

172. Legitimacy of Social Media Accounts:

A social media account with 10,000 followers and 2 posts is probably interpreted a lot differently than another 10,000-follower strong account with lots of interaction. In fact, Google filed a patent for determining whether or not social media accounts were real or fake.

173. Brand Mentions on Top Stories:

Really big brands get mentioned on Top Stories sites all the time. In fact, some brands even have a feed of news from their own website, on the first page:

174. Unlinked Brand Mentions:

Brands get mentioned without getting linked to. Google likely looks at non-hyperlinked brand mentions as a brand signal.

175. Brick and Mortar Location:

Real businesses have offices. It’s possible that Google fishes for location-data to determine whether or not a site is a big brand.

On-Site Webspam Factors

176. Panda Penalty:

Websites with low-quality content (particularly content farms) are less visible in search after getting hit by a Panda penalty.

177. Links to Bad Neighbourhoods:

Linking out to “bad neighborhoods” — like spammy pharmacy or payday loan websites — may hurt your search visibility.

178. Redirects:

Sneaky redirects is a big no-no. If caught, it can get a website not just penalised, but de-indexed.

179. Popups or “Distracting Ads”:

The official Google Rater Guidelines Document says that popups and distracting ads is a sign of a low-quality website.

180. Interstitial Popups:

Google may penalise websites that display full page “interstitial” popups to mobile users.

181. Site Over-Optimisation:

Yes, Google does penalise people for over-optimising their site. This includes: keyword stuffing, header tag stuffing, excessive keyword decoration.

182. Gibberish Content:

A Google Patent outlines how Google can identify “gibberish” content, which is helpful for filtering out spun or auto-generated content from their index.

183. Doorway Pages:

Google wants the page you show to Google to be the page that user ultimately see. If your page redirects people to another page, that’s a “Doorway Page”. Needless to say, Google doesn’t like websites that use Doorway Pages.

184. Ads Above the Fold:

The “Page Layout Algorithm” penalises websites with lots of ads (and not much content) above the fold.

185. Hiding Affiliate Links:

Going too far when trying to hide affiliate links (especially with cloaking) can bring on a penalty.

186. Fred:

A nickname given to a series of Google updates starting in 2017. According to Search Engine Land, Fred “targets low-value content sites that put revenue above helping their users.”

187. Affiliate Sites:

It’s no secret that Google isn’t the biggest fan of affiliates. And many think that sites that monetise with affiliate programs are put under extra scrutiny.

188. Autogenerated Content:

Google understandably hates autogenerated content. If they suspect that your site’s pumping out computer-generated content, it could result in a penalty or de-indexing.

189. Excess PageRank Sculpting:

Going too far with PageRank sculpting — by nofollowing all outbound links — may be a sign of gaming the system.

190. IP Address Flagged as Spam:

If your server’s IP address is flagged for spam, it may affect all websites on that server.

191. Meta Tag Spamming: Keyword stuffing can also happen in meta tags. If Google thinks you’re adding keywords to your title and description tags in an effort to game the algo, they may hit your site with a penalty.

Off-Site Webspam Factors

192. Hacked Site:

If your site gets hacked it can get dropped from the search results. In fact, Search Engine Land was completed deindexed after Google thought it had been hacked.

193. Unnatural Influx of Links:

A sudden (and unnatural) influx of links is a sure-fire sign of phony links.

194. Penguin Penalty:

Websites that were hit by Google Penguin are significantly less visible in search. Although, apparently, Penguin now focuses more on filtering out bad links vs. penalising entire websites.

195. Link Profile with High % of Low Quality Links:

Lots of links from sources commonly used by black hat SEOs (like blog comments and forum profiles) may be a sign of gaming the system.

196. Links From Unrelated Websites:

A high-percentage of backlinks from topically-unrelated sites can increase the odds of a manual penalty.

197. Unnatural Links Warning:

Google has sent out thousands of “Google Search Console notice of detected unnatural links” messages. This usually precedes a ranking drop, although not 100% of the time.

198. Low-Quality Directory Links:

According to Google, backlinks from low-quality directories can lead to a penalty.

199. Widget Links:

Google frowns on links that are automatically generated when user embeds a “widget” on their site.

200. Links from the Same Class C IP:

Getting an unnatural amount of links from sites on the same server IP may help Google determine that your links are coming from a blog network.

201. “Poison” Anchor Text:

Having “poison” anchor text (especially pharmacy keywords) pointed to your website may be a sign of spam or a hacked site. Either way, it can hurt your website’s ranking.

202. Unnatural Link Spike:

A 2013 Google Patent describes how Google can identify whether or not an influx of links to a page is legitimate. Those unnatural links may become devalued.

203. Links From Articles and Press Releases:

Articles directories and press releases has been abused to the point that Google now considers these two link building strategies a “link scheme” in many cases.

204. Manual Actions:

There are several types of these, but most are related to black hat link building.

205. Selling Links:

Getting caught selling links can hurt your search visibility.

206. Google Sandbox:

New sites that get a sudden influx of links are sometimes put in the Google Sandbox, which temporarily limits search visibility.

207. Google Dance:

The Google Dance can temporarily shake up rankings. According to a Google Patent, this may be a way for them to determine whether or not a site is trying to game the algorithm.

208. Disavow Tool:

Use of the Disavow Tool may remove a manual or algorithmic penalty for sites that were the victims of negative SEO.

209. Reconsideration Request:

A successful reconsideration request can lift a penalty.

210. Temporary Link Schemes:

Google has caught onto people that create — and quickly remove — spammy links. Also know as a temporary link scheme.

You can read more on this article and other marketing tips and advice.

— Read on backlinko.com/google-ranking-factors

Business and Sports News from Mike Armstrong – See http://mikearmstrong.me

The 10 Most Important SEO Tips You Need to Know

The 10 Most Important SEO Tips You Need to Know…

A lot has changed in the world of search engine optimisation.

However, certain fundamental principles remain unchanged. 

For example, targeting keywords with the sole intent of improving organic rankings no longer works with search engines but choosing the right keywords is still an important piece to the puzzle.

Here’s the top 10 SEO tips that you need to know.

— Read on www.google.co.uk/amp/s/neilpatel.com/blog/10-most-important-seo-tips-you-need-to-know/amp/

Business and Sports News from Mike Armstrong – See http://mikearmstrong.me

Top 5 Web Marketing Tips for New Business Startups and SME’s

1. Twitter Marketing

Set up a Twitter Account and Follow up to 5,000 of your target audience.

A large proportion will follow you back and those that don’t can be unfollowed so that you can follow some more.

This could be a particular niche or businesses / consumers in a certain geographical location. Whilst you are building followers and when you have thousands of followers, send out information, tips, offers, competitions and advice that would be useful and of interest to your target audience.

2. Facebook Marketing, Facebook Pages and Facebook Group Marketing

Use your personal Facebook account to connect with potential customers and partners, also create a Facebook Page and get your friends, potential partners and target audience (clients etc) to like and share your page. Whilst you are building likers & followers and when you have thousands of followers, send out information, tips, offers, competitions and advice that would be useful and of interest to your target audience.

You can also set up groups for your target audiences and get some of those to join your group where you can also share information, tips, offers, competitions and advice that would be useful and of interest to your target audience.

3. LinkedIn Marketing and LinkedIn Company Pages

Make sure you have a good LinkedIn profile page that covers everything that you do including all of your skills and which links to your company website, blog and Facebook page etc. Also add links to any video that you might have etc.

Also create a Company page on LinkedIn (you need an email address on a registered domain to do this) and regularly post information, tips, offers, competitions and advice that would be useful and of interest to your target audience via your LinkedIn company page and your regular posts facility on LinkedIn.

Finally on LinkedIn regularly connect with lots of people in your target audience on LinkedIn (but not to many all at once though as LinkedIn can block you). Also join lots of groups full of your target audience and connect with them via the group (Something linkedin allows you to do more aggressively than just connecting with people).

4. Blogging

Create a blog or ideally add a blog to your existing website or get a new website with a blog already included and start blogging regularly about your business, products and services etc.

This can help to improve the Seo of your website and get it associated with more keywords to help you get indexed more regularly the search engines and helping you to appear higher up and more often in the internet page ranks.

5. Keyword Content Marketing via content pages on your website

You should have an existing website or get a new website and create great keyword written landing pages for your business, as well as every single product and service and geographical area covered etc.
This will help to improve the Seo of your website and get it associated with more keywords to help you appear higher up and more often in the internet search engine page ranks helping you to get more enquiries.

If you need any help with any of the above please call: 07517 024979 or email: maconsultancy1@gmail.com

SEO Tips / SEO Advice / Blogging Advice

New post on Online Marketing Hub

How to Be the Best Answer with Topic Targeting
by christopherjanb

This weekend I had the good fortune to present at the Minnesota Blogger Conference where nearly 300 local bloggers gathered to learn, get inspired and network.

For my part, I gave a presentation on how blogs are still an incredibly useful tool for marketing. Keeping the reason for blogging top of mind as well as empathy for reader preferences in how they find, consume and act on information are essential if a blog author expects marketing outcomes from their efforts.

When a blog or any content hub can become “the best answer” for the topics that are important for buyers, the return on blogging goes way, way up. One way to execute a content plan to become known as an authority is through topic targeting.

For experienced multi-channel and integrated marketing pros, this kind of approach is going to be fairly common. But for the vast majority of bloggers, whether they be corporate or enthusiasts, the shift from writing for yourself (or your brand) to writing to satisfy specific audience needs is a fundamental shift.

Topic targeting starts by answering a few key questions:

How do you want to be known? How do you want your product or service to be known? What are you, your brand, product or serve the “best answer” for? That singular distinction is essential in order to stand out.
What questions relevant to your area of expertise do buyers have? What information do they need in order to move from curiosity to specific interest to transaction?
As you come to find the sweet spot between how you want to be known and what customers care about, that’s the focus of your topic targeting plan.

Topic targeting is an approach that involves creating resources, experiences and connections that result in an undisputed affinity between a target topic and your brand.
On a large scale for large companies, this is essentially brand marketing. For a small or medium business without massive budgets or resources, these 3 phases below represent a practical approach to becoming the “best answer” wherever customers are looking.

Inspire:
When starting out from a position without prominent authority on your desired topic, one of the most effective ways to close the gap between where you are and where you want your brand to be is to connect with those that already have the authority and community you desire. Recognizing topical influencers in a creative and qualitative way with an emphasis on inspiring readers to think in new ways about the topic is a good start. Co-creating content with topic influencers is also particularly effective. Your target topic will drive which influencers you engage with, the questions and interactions you have, and the titling of the resulting content.

Additional inspire tactics include speaking events that are “on topic” in the conference scope, track and/or title of your presentation. Social engagement promoting target topic content and events should also align. Comments made on industry articles (blogs and online magazines) are also opportunities to create affinity. Blogging about the target topic from different perspectives (what would a buyer need to know from start to finish) is also an effective directed content effort that will contribute to becoming the best answer.

Lastly, a limited number of guest posts on relevant, high profile blogs and contributed articles to industry magazines and websites on your target topic will provided added support for your brand and the target topic.

Desire:
Anticipation is a gateway to topical authority. Continuing to blog on the target topic and growing influencer relationships will lead to even more community engagement opportunities. Consistent creation of useful and entertaining blog content as well as alignment with industry influencers will create a very powerful mental state amongst your blog readers: anticipation. A community that can’t wait to see what you’re going to publish next will be instrumental for amplifying content and stimulating new perspectives on your target topic. That desire leads to advocacy, evangelism and scale for reaching a target audience in a highly credible way.

Acquire:
Demand for information and expertise leads to demand for your solutions. As authority is built on your target topic represented by the content you create on your own websites, third party references to your brand as an authority, growth of your community around the topic and advertising activities, there are several opportunities to show more tangible evidence of expertise: Some examples include:

Case studies
Definitive topic resource/guide
Events – online and off
Industry survey and report (annual)
Lists recognizing experts in the topic (annual or quarterly)
All of these tactics provide opportunities for readers to move from awareness and learning about the topic (with your brand at the forefront) to consideration and action – leads and transactions. Consumers increasingly expect to be able to educate themselves to a purchase decision and making it easy to find, experience and act on your content isn’t just good content marketing, it’s what buyers want.

Specificity is essential with topic targeting as are patience and persistence. This is an earned achievement that also needs to be maintained. But once consensus and momentum are achieved, the ability to attract those actively seeking what you have to offer will expand the value of your content beyond lead generation and sales to other means of monetization – sponsorships, advertising, syndication.

To apply the approach mentioned in this post will require some homework – research in your market or industry to see what kinds of content and messages resonate with the target audience. That’s where the audience Discovery, Consumption and Action model for understanding your audience comes in to play. It is also a continuous effort that can start simply and scale based on what works and what doesn’t.

But the most important thing if all, is to start: How do you want to be known? How does that fit with what your customers want to know?

For more on this SEO Tips /SEO Advice / Blogging Advice post or content marketing in general see:
http://omhub.wordpress.com/2014/10/27/how-to-be-the-best-answer-with-topic-targeting/

The SEO Tips / SEO Advice / Blogging Advice page was posted “By Mike Armstrong”

IMG_0153.JPG

Popular Cardiff Blog Posts from Yesterday, Tuesday and Last Week!

Networking Breakfast in Cardiff Bay:

http://maconsultancycardiff.com/business-networking-events/networking-breakfast-event-at-the-stunning-cote-brasserie-in-the-heart-of-cardiff-bay-for-this-friday/

Twitter Training Cardiff:

http://maconsultancycardiff.com/social-media-training-cardiff/twitter-training-cardiff-2/

Record Demand for England Rugby World Cup 2015 Tickets:

http://maconsultancycardiff.com/rugby-world-cup-2015/record-demand-for-england-rugby-world-cup-2015-tickets/

*If you like these popular marketing blog posts from yesterday you may also like these other marketing blog posts from Tuesday and Last week:

Tuesday’s popular marketing blog posts:

How to be above average on Twitter:

http://maconsultancycardiff.com/social-media/how-to-be-above-average-on-twitter/

Twitter Training Wales:

http://maconsultancycardiff.com/twitter-training/twitter-training-wales-2/

Content Marketing / Content Writing for Search Engine Optimisation

http://maconsultancycardiff.com/content-marketing/content-marketing-content-writing-for-search-engine-optimisation-2/

How Users view and interact with Google Search Engine Results Page

http://maconsultancycardiff.com/marketing/a-recent-post-about-how-users-view-and-interact-with-google-search-engine-results-page/

*If you like these popular blog posts from yesterday and Tuesday you might also like these popular posts from last week:

Popular Blogposts from last week:

Business Woman Networking Event in Cardiff:

http://maconsultancycardiff.com/business-networking-events/business-woman-networking-business-event-in-cardiff-south-wales/

Would you like to find out how to increase your website or blog traffic by 100% to 500%+???

http://maconsultancycardiff.com/web-marketing-training/would-you-like-to-find-out-how-to-increase-your-website-or-blog-traffic-by-100-to-500/

Does your website work for you? – If not engage with a website consultant

http://maconsultancycardiff.com/business-news/does-your-website-work-for-you-if-not-engage-with-a-website-consultant/

Christmas Party Venue in Cardiff, South Wales

http://maconsultancycardiff.com/cardiff-business-news/christmas-party-venue-in-cardiff-south-wales/

Website Marketing Tip

http://maconsultancycardiff.com/business-marketing/website-marketing-tip/

Twitter Marketing Tip

http://maconsultancycardiff.com/business-marketing/twitter-marketing-tip/

Networking Event in Cardiff:

http://maconsultancycardiff.com/business-event-in-cardiff/networking-event-in-cardiff/

8 things you might not know about UK SME’s – An Infographic

http://maconsultancycardiff.com/business-news/8-things-you-might-not-know-about-uk-smes-an-infographic/

Rugby World Cup 2015 Fixture Schedule:

http://maconsultancycardiff.com/welsh-sport/rugby-world-cup-2015-fixture-schedule/

Beaujolais Day:

http://maconsultancycardiff.com/business-networking-events/beaujolais-day-in-south-wales-2/

Networking Event in Cardiff:

http://maconsultancycardiff.com/cardiff-business-event/business-networking-event-in-the-heart-of-the-city-of-cardiff-for-thursday/

30 Actionable Content Marketing Tips:

http://maconsultancycardiff.com/business-advice/30-actionable-content-marketing-tips-you-can-use-right-now/

5 Expert Tips regarding the Hashtag #

http://maconsultancycardiff.com/business-marketing/5-expert-tips-regarding-the-hashtag/

Some popular Welsh Business Hashtags

http://maconsultancycardiff.com/social-media/some-popular-welsh-business-hashtags/

Twitter Marketing Tip:

http://maconsultancycardiff.com/business-marketing/twitter-marketing-tip-5/

SEO Tip / Search Engine Optimisation:

http://maconsultancycardiff.com/blogging/seo-tip-search-engine-optimisation/

The popular Cardiff blog posts from yesterday and last week page was posted “By Mike Armstrong”

IMG_0153.JPG

SEO Tip / Search Engine Optimisation

If you want your Website to improve its ranking in the Internet search engines, and have it associated with more keywords in order to get more traffic integrate a blog to your website and start a content marketing strategy!

Write about your products, services, staff, events, case studies and offers and share you marketing material.

If you need help use the advice of a content marketing specialist or outsource some of the content marketing services to an outsourced service provider like MA Consultancy:

07517 024979 | maconsultancy1@gmail.com

*If you liked this SEO Tip – You might like our Social Media & SEO Training:

http://maconsultancycardiff.com/social-media-training-cardiff/social-media-training-cardiff/

The SEO Tip / Search Engine Optimisation page was written “By Mike Armstrong”

IMG_0153.JPG

SEO Tip / Search Engine Optimisation

If you want your Website to improve its ranking in the Internet search engines, and have it associated with more keywords in order to get more traffic integrate a blog to your website and start a content marketing strategy!

Write about your products, services, staff, events, case studies and offers and share you marketing material.

If you need help use the advice of a content marketing specialist or outsource some of the content marketing services to an outsourced service provider like MA Consultancy:

07517 024979 | maconsultancy1@gmail.com

*If you liked this SEO Tip – You might like our Social Media & SEO Training:

http://maconsultancycardiff.com/social-media-training-cardiff/social-media-training-cardiff/

The SEO Tip / Search Engine Optimisation page was written “By Mike Armstrong”

IMG_0153.JPG

Basic SEO Tip – Link Building

If you want to improve the ranking of your website get your real world contacts (Partners, Customers, Suppliers, Associations) with websites, to marketing your business and website on their website with a link.

Additional Tip: If you can get them to add some marketing info and a link for free or without exchange that’s perfect but if not exchanging a link (swapping your with one for them) is the next best option and it can also be worth paying for this type of marketing with a link on some sites (especially if they have a high ranking website or a high relevancy to your site website – such as a Trade Body or Association)!

*If you like this SEO Tip you might also like this Twitter Tip & Web Marketing Tip:

Twitter Marketing Tip

Web Marketing Tip

The Basic SEO Tip – Link Building was created & posted “By Mike Armstrong”

Basic SEO Tip – Link Building Tip

If you want to improve the ranking of your website get your real world contacts (Partners, Customers, Suppliers, Associations) with websites, to marketing your business and website on their website with a link.

Additional Tip: If you can get them to add some marketing info and a link for free or without exchange that’s perfect but if not exchanging a link (swapping your with one for them) is the next best option and it can also be worth paying for this type of marketing with a link on some sites (especially if they have a high ranking website or a high relevancy to your site website – such as a Trade Body or Association)!

*If you like this SEO Tip you might also like this Twitter Tip & Web Marketing Tip or our Link Building Service:

Twitter Marketing Tip

Web Marketing Tip

The Basic SEO Tip – Link Building Tip was created & posted “By Mike Armstrong”

Content Marketing & SEO Advice!

New post on Online Marketing Hub

How To Be Successful With Content Marketing Through Your Search Engine Strategy
by christopherjanb

Find a publicly advertised brand you identify with, from a healthy perspective, and follow their brand online.

What do you see?

Consistent values? Positive, helpful and resourceful communication? Ways to get in touch with them?

If you answer, “yes” to these questions, then that brand shows positive signs of effective content marketing through search engine strategy.

Content marketing and search engine strategy go hand-in-hand now more than ever.

Taking all the above into consideration, I did a brief case study using Kaiser Permanente to demonstrate how search strategy works. You can see for yourself how Kaiser has tapped into the power of content marketing through their search engine strategy.

In this article, I’ll walk you through the basics of optimizing Google’s search capabilities for your own brand’s content marketing success. You’ll learn about the following:

How IP addresses and location-based services play into localized search engine strategy.
The importance of branding… and why paying for Google ads may be worth your while.
Why and how Google rewards brands that create quality content.
First, let’s talk about search engine strategy…
Enter ‘Kaiser’ in the Google search bar and you’ll find this:

See link below:

You’ll Notice the following in the screenshot:

1. The result numbers from your search term.

The search term, ‘Kaiser,’ yields about 47,100,000 results from across the entire Web. What does this mean to you? Take into consideration the strength you – i.e., your website – must have to be #1 on the first page of only about ten.

2. A map showing you the results of the matching Kaiser locations in your area.

Your computer has what is known as an “IP address,” which is short for Internet Protocol address. Google, and other sites, use your IP address to identify computers on the Internet.

Your IP address is typically based on your real-world location, which helps Google provide you with relevant, local results. You can learn more about what Google has to say about IP addresses, including how to find yours here.

More people currently rely on their mobile devices to search and obtain instant and accurate results from their search efforts than ever before. Location services for mobile devices are essential for viewing maps and other local results, based on your current location. Google Maps can detect your location through the following:

GPS
WiFi
Cell Tower
Apple Location Services
Google provides helpful suggestions for improving your location’s accuracy, GPS signals, and more for your mobile device here.

3. Kaiser’ ad is the first result.

Google likes ads. I’ll talk more about that below.

4. The second result is their name in URL/website domain name format, and their top locations in your area.

Site structure, page names, and organization is important for the user experience and helps Google find information quickly. IP addresses and GPS/location settings also make a difference.

5. The third result is a social profile where reviews are encouraged and unconfirmed, such as Yelp.

Google prefers sites which are based on traffic, use or advertisement procurement.

What did this case study teach me about using search engine strategy for my own content marketing?
I learned about the importance of branding and advertising
Your brand name is everything.
Dominating the webiverse with your brand name is a great end goal. Since IP addresses are key for people finding you online, you’ll want to start locally and build up from there. Google rewards brands that register their physical locations by giving them top placement within search engine results. A recent article via Vertical Response lists the top 20 places where you should list your business online.

Social profiles and reviews are important to Google.
As your brand’s name gains exposure, more people start learning about you and your name. As more people use your brand name in these sites, it also helps Google recognize you, helping your brand show up higher in Google rankings and search results.

Google likes being paid.
Paying for advertising, especially search advertising, increases the likelihood that your brand name shows up in Google search results. Using Google AdWords makes it easy to create and run ad campaigns. Depending on how much you pay and the types of campaigns you set up, you can control different features of your ad, such as where it shows up in a Google search.

I also learned more about how to create the content Google wants…and how that can work for my clients and my business…
Our website pages and content are only as valuable as the words we use.
How often do you hear the expression, “content is king”? We hear it often because, when it comes to your website ranking higher in search results, it’s still very much the truth. When it comes to creating content, we need to understand that it’s the quality of our words that matters. Not only are people searching online for content that informs and educates them, but the Google search engine also craves useful and appealing content. Google wants results which are relevant to the search and to share the best, most trustworthy results.

Moz explains the importance of creating “great content” for your site in the following way:

“ Every search performed at the engines comes with an intent – to find, learn, solve, buy, fix, treat, or understand. Search engines place web pages in their results in order to satisfy that intent in the best possible way, and crafting the most fulfilling, thorough content that addresses a searcher’s needs provides an excellent chance to earn top rankings.”

Regular content is extremely valuable.
We know now how Google prefers quality content, but Google especially rewards those sites which produce quality content regularly.

Eric Sornoso lists and explains the following 3 reasons about why the Google search engine likes regular posting in his recent article for SEOBlog.com, “Google Rewards Sites That Regularly Post Great Content”:

Google likes fresh, new content.
Google likes a constant flow of content.
Google likes accountability.
Creating quality content on a regular basis certainly helps Google (and potential clients) find you, but you can also take extra steps to improve your results. For example, one of the first (and best) actions you should take, especially when your site is new, is to set up your RSS with Feedburner.

This is Google’s RSS Management tool, and it notifies Google each time your blog is updated with a new post. Even better? As you start producing content which generates higher traffic to your website, Google will continue rewarding you through more traffic referrals. It’s a win-win-win: for you, for Google, and for the searcher.

Over to you
Without a doubt, tapping into the power of Google and forming a strong search engine strategy can take your content marketing – and your business – to entirely new levels. Are you using search engine strategy as a way to bolster your own content marketing efforts?

Author information

Jamie Teasdale
Founder & Lead Strategist at Plan Promote Prosper
Jamie Teasdale is a business growth advocate and strategist who is passionate about supporting small businesses in their quest to effectively communicate with their target market. Focusing on content marketing (inbound and outbound) and brand messaging, Jamie’s company Plan Promote Prosper assists companies who recognize the value of strategic and consistent content marketing through blogging, email marketing and social media engagement, and the impact it makes toward positive SEO.
Planning a content marketing strategy is no small endeavor and should be done each year. Jamie and her team make it easy and affordable. Plan Promote Prosper offers eight white-labeled content marketing products and services that are sought after by leading marketing companies, web firms, copywriters and social managers. Jamie’s office is located in downtown Portland, Oregon. In her spare time, Jamie enjoys painting, traveling and spending time with friends and family.

For this full article including images see:
http://omhub.wordpress.com/2014/10/15/how-to-be-successful-with-content-marketing-through-your-search-engine-strategy/

Content Marketing & SEO Advice page posted “By Mike Armstrong”

Website News – Conversion Rates

New post on Online Marketing Hub

4 Powerful Conversion Rate Influencers
by christopherjanb

Conversion rates are lifeblood statistics for webmasters. If Kyle Rush taught us anything about optimization at the Obama campaign, it’s to test everything like mad scientists.

Whether you are trying to promote readership, sell a product or drive traffic to a particular page, you want to increase the rate at which this behavior occurs. In order to achieve this goal, it is important to consider the factors that influence users’ decisions during the conversion process.

We’re going to look at:

How colors influence purchase rates, meanings, and sets a brand tone
How site speed can help – or hinder – conversion rates
How decision fatigue reduces conversions and why less choices is better for consumers
Why custom reporting is vital to optimizing for conversions, such as capitalizing on an influx of mobile or location-targeted users
The Influence of Color
When it comes to the purchasing decision, color is one of the most influential factors in determining whether or not a customer buys a product. This often, overlooked element of marketing can be very useful or detrimental depending upon whether or not it is taken advantage of.

For instance, 85% of customers cited color as the primary reason they purchased a particular product. One factor that plays into the importance of color involves the subconscious decisions that people make. After ninety seconds, people have already made a subconscious decision about a product and 90% of the time that decision is based on color.

Gender is also an important element to consider because men and women respond differently to different colors. Men enjoy products that are blue, black or sea foam green, and they tend to stay away from purple, brown and orange. Women on the other hand, like purple along with blue and sea foam green, while revealing a similar distaste for brown and orange.

The associations that people make with colors are important to consider when designing a product, website or brick and mortar store.The art and science of color theory embodies everything from meanings across cultures to light sensitivity. The following list shows the general meanings of different colors, specifically in the United States:

Red: lust, negative issues, excitement, love

Example: Target

Yellow: jealousy, competence, happiness

Example: Lipton Ice Tea

Green: good taste, envy

Example: Garnier

Blue: masculine, competence, high quality, corporate

Example: UB Solution

Pink: sophistication, sincerity

Example: Ouou

Violet/Purple: authority, sophistication, power

Example: Kaleidoscope

Brown: ruggedness

Example: Wawa

Black: grief, sophistication, expensive, fear

Example: HBO

White: happiness, sincerity, purity

Example: Apple

In digital environments – websites – colors are often leveraged to motivate users, normally in the form of a subscription, purchase, download, or click-through. The base color for a company logo or brand does not mean call to action buttons need to match or be harmonious in color. In fact, buttons with colors that contrast the main theme actually grab more attention.

The Influence of Site Speed
Website speed is a critical factor for converting customers online. One conversion rate study revealed a strong correlation between faster page load times and increased conversions. Every second that the page load time was reduced yielded a percentage increase in conversions. Conversion rates increased 3% for every second the loading time was reduced from fifteen to seven seconds.

This correlation was not limited to purchase conversions, as page load times proved to be an important factor in influencing donations. A study regarding the 2011 Obama for America campaign revealed that a three second reduction in page load time yielded a 14% increase in donations. This research reflects the importance of improving site speed for both for-profit and non-profit websites.

It’s easy to measure site speed today; just head over to Google’s page speed insights. In the example below, I put my own blog on the chopping block and you’ll see there’s a lot I can do to increase my page speed/reduce loading times:

The Influence of Choices
The number of choices that your landing page offers visitors is another element that impacts conversion rates. A basic summary of the research on this topic suggests an inverse relationship between the number of choices offered and conversion rates. Contrary to popular belief, more choices lead to fewer conversions as visitors are distracted, rather than being led to the point of conversion.

In terms of specific examples, social sharing buttons, webinar registration options, contact fields and landing page fields are all elements that should be limited in order to increase conversions. One study regarding social share buttons indicated that total shares decreased by 29% when two additional buttons were added to QuickSprout’s site. The same idea applied to a study regarding webinar registration, as conversions increased by 16.93% when the number of available sessions was reduced from four to three. This data suggests that the old saying less is an important rule when it comes to landing page design.

The Influence of Custom Reporting
Analyzing custom reports on Google Analytics is another excellent strategy for increasing website conversions. The way in which you interpret the data generated from your site’s activity can offer valuable information for improving user experiences and increasing conversions.

One valuable report is a measurement of conversion rates based on the browser and device with which the user accessed your site. The browsers and devices for which you have the lowest conversion rates indicate opportunities for improvements. For instance, if mobile users are producing the lowest conversion rates then improving your mobile site should become a priority.

Top landing pages is another report that offers insight regarding where improvement efforts should be focused. By looking at your top landing pages and comparing their bounce rates to the site’s average, you can identify which top landing pages need to be revisited and tweaked.

Comparing new vs. returning traffic can further help webmasters understand how people behave on landing pages. This data can be broken down to compare different landing pages in order to see where new and returning visitors have the highest or lowest conversion rates.

Considering that the ultimate goal of every website is to convert users in one way or another, it is important to understand the factors that influence conversions. Consider the aforementioned conversion rate influencers when developing your own website or blog.

Author information

Jesse Aaron
Jesse Aaron is a professional blogger with a passion for homebrewing, and writes on a variety of topics on his blog Mashbout. In his spare time Jesse enjoys redditting, brewing beer (as you may have guessed), slowly learning Python, and reading (currently reading Infinite Jest). Follow Jesse on Google Plus.

For more about this article or content marketing in general see:
http://omhub.wordpress.com/2014/10/09/4-powerful-conversion-rate-influencers/

The 4 Powerful Conversion Rate Influencers page was posted “By Mike Armstrong”

Link Building Tips

A recent post on Online Marketing Hub

The Future of Link Building

by christopherjanb
Posted by Paddy_Moogan

Building the types of links that help grow your online business and organic search traffic is getting harder. It used to be fairly straightforward, back before Google worked out how to treat links with different levels of quality and trust. However, the fact that it’s getting harder doesn’t mean that it’s dead.

What does the future hold?

I’m going to talk about links, but the truth is, the future isn’t really about the links. It is far bigger than that.

Quick sidenote: I’m aware that doing a blog post about the future of link building the week of a likely Penguin update could leave me with egg on my face! But we’ll see what happens.

Links will always be a ranking factor in some form or another. I can see the dials being turned down or off on certain aspects of links (more on that below) but I think they will always be there. Google is always looking for more data, more signals, more indicators of whether or not a certain page is a good result for a user at a certain moment in time. They will find them too, as we can see from
patents such as this. A natural consequence is that other signals may be diluted or even replaced as Google becomes smarter and understands the web and users a lot better.

What this means for the future is that the links valued by Google will be the ones you get as a result of having a great product and great marketing. Essentially, links will be symptomatic of amazing marketing. Hat tip to
Jess Champion who I’ve borrowed this term from.

This isn’t easy, but it shouldn’t be. That’s the point.

To go a bit further, I think we also need to think about the bigger picture. In the grand scheme of things, there are so many more signals that Google can use which, as marketers, we need to understand and use to our advantage. Google is changing and we can’t bury our heads in the sand and ignore what is going on.

A quick side note on spammy links
My background is a spammy one so I can’t help but address this quickly. Spam will continue to work for short-term hits and churn and burn websites. I’ve talked before about
my position on this so I won’t go into too much more detail here. I will say though that those people who are in the top 1% of spammers will continue to make money, but even for them, it will be hard to maintain over a long period of time.

Let’s move onto some more of the detail around my view of the future by first looking at the past and present.

What we’ve seen in the past
Google didn’t understand links.

The fundamental issue that Google had for a long, long time was that they didn’t understand enough about links. They didn’t understand things such as:

How much to trust a link
Whether a link was truly editorially given or not
Whether a link was paid for or not
If a link was genuinely high quality (PageRank isn’t perfect)
How relevant a link was
Whilst they still have work to do on all of these, they have gotten much better in recent years. At one time, a link was a link and it was pretty much a case of whoever had the most links, won. I think that for a long time, Google was trying very hard to understand links and find which ones were high quality, but there was so much noise that it was very difficult. I think that eventually they realised that they had to attack the problem from a different angle and
Penguin came along. So instead of focusing on finding the “good” signals of links, they focused on finding the “bad” signals and started to take action on them. This didn’t fix everything, but it did enough to shock our industry into moving away from certain tactics and therefore, has probably helped reduce a lot of the noise that Google was seeing.

What we’re seeing right now
Google is understanding more about language.

Google is getting better at understanding everything.
Hummingbird was just the start of what Google hopes to achieve on this front and it stands to reason that the same kind of technology that helps the following query work, will also help Google understand links better.

Not many people in the search industry said much when
Google hired this guy back in 2012. We can be pretty sure that it’s partly down to his work that we’re seeing the type of understanding of language that we are. His work has only just begun, though, and I think we’ll see more queries like the one above that just shouldn’t work, but they do. I also think we’ll see more instances of Googlers not knowing why something ranks where it does.

Google is understanding more about people.

I talk about this a little more below but to quickly summarise here, Google is learning more about us all the time. It can seem creepy, but the fact is that Google wants as much data as possible from us so that they can serve more relevant search results—and advertising of course. They are understanding more that the keywords we type into Google may not actually be what we want to find, nor are those keywords enough to find what we really want. Google needs more context.

Tom Anthony has
talked about this extensively so I won’t go into loads more detail. But to bring it back to link building, it is important to be aware of this because it means that there are more and more signals that could mean the dial on links gets turned down a bit more.

Some predictions about the future
I want to make a few things more concrete about my view of the future for link building, so let’s look at a few specifics.

1. Anchor text will matter less and less
Anchor text as a ranking signal was always something that works well in theory but not in reality. Even in my early days of link building, I couldn’t understand why Google put so much weight behind this one signal. My main reason for this view was that using exact match keywords in a link was not natural for most webmasters. I’d go as far as to say the only people who used it were SEOs!

I’m don’t think we’re at a point yet where anchor text as a ranking signal is dead and it will take some more time for Google to turn down the dial. But we definitely are at a point where you can get hurt pretty badly if you have too much commercial anchor text in your link profile. It just isn’t natural.

In the future, Google won’t need this signal. They will be much better at understanding the content of a page and importantly, the context of a page.

2. Deep linking will matter less and less
I was on the fence about this one for a long time but the more I think about it, the more I can see this happening. I’ll explain my view here by using an example.

Let’s imagine you’re an eCommerce website and you sell laptops. Obviously each laptop you sell will have its own product page and if you sell different types, you’ll probably have category pages too. With a products like laptops, chances are that other retailers sell the same ones with the same specifications and probably have very similar looking pages to yours. How does Google know which one to rank better than others?

Links to these product pages can work fine but in my opinion, is a bit of a crude way of working it out. I think that Google will get better at understanding the subtle differences in queries from users which will naturally mean that deep links to these laptop pages will be one of many signals they can use.

Take these queries:

“laptop reviews”

Context: I want to buy a laptop but I don’t know which one.

“asus laptop reviews”

Context: I like the sound of Asus, I want to read more about their laptops.

“sony laptop reviews”

Context: I also like the sound of Sony, I want to read more about their laptops.

“sony vs asus laptop”

Context: I’m confused, they both sound the same so I want a direct comparison to help me decide.

“asus laptop”

Context: I want an Asus laptop.

You can see how the mindset of the user has changed over time and we can easily imagine how the search results will have changed to reflect this. Google already understand this. There are other signals coming into play here too though, what about these bits of additional information that Google can gather about us:

Location: I’m on a bus in London, I may not want to buy a £1,000 laptop right now but I’ll happily research them.
Device: I’m on my iPhone 6, I may not want to input credit card details into it and I worry that the website I’m using won’t work well on a small screen.
Search history: I’ve searched for laptops before and visited several retailers, but I keep going back to the same one as I’ve ordered from them before.
These are just a few that are easy for us to imagine Google using. There are loads more that Google could look at, not to mention signals from the retailers themselves such as secure websites, user feedback, 3rd party reviews, trust signals etc.

When you start adding all of these signals together, it’s pretty easy to see why links to a specific product page may not be the strongest signal for Google to use when determining rankings.

Smaller companies will be able to compete more.

One of the things I loved about SEO when I first got into it was the fact that organic search felt like a level playing field. I knew that with the right work, I could beat massive companies in the search results and not have to spend a fortune doing it. Suffice to say, things have changed quite a bit now and there are some industries where you stand pretty much zero chance of competing unless you have a very big budget to spend and a great product.

I think we will see a shift back in the other direction and smaller companies with fewer links will be able to rank for certain types of queries with a certain type of context. As explained above, context is key and allows Google to serve up search results that meet the context of the user. This means that massive brands are not always going to be the right answer for users and Google have to get better at understanding this. Whether a company is classified as a “brand” or not can be subjective. My local craft beer shop in London is the only one in the world and if you were to ask 100 people if they’d heard of it, they’d all probably say no. But it’s a brand to me because I love their products, their staff are knowledgeable and helpful, their marketing is cool and I’d always recommend them.

Sometimes, showing the website of this shop above bigger brands in search results is the right thing to do for a user. Google need lots of additional signals beyond “branding” and links in order to do this but I think they will get them.

What all of this means for us
Predicting the future is hard, knowing what to do about it is pretty hard too! But here are some things that I think we should be doing.

Ask really hard questions
Marketing is hard. If you or your client wants to compete and win customers, then you need to be prepared to ask really hard questions about the company. Here are just a few that I’ve found difficult when talking to clients:
Why does the company exist? (A good answer has nothing to do with making money)
Why do you deserve to rank well in Google?
What makes you different to your competitors?
If you disappeared from Google tomorrow, would anyone notice?
Why do you deserve to be linked to?
What value do you provide for users?
The answers to these won’t always give you that silver bullet, but they can provoke conversations that make the client look inwardly and at why they should deserve links and customers. These questions are hard to answer, but again, that’s the point.

Stop looking for scalable link building tactics
Seriously, just stop. Anything that can be scaled tends to lose quality and anything that scales is likely to be targeted by the Google webspam team at some point.

A recent piece of content we did at Distilled has so far generated links from over 700 root domains—we did NOT send 700 outreach emails! This piece took on a life of its own and generated those links after some promotion by us, but at no point did we worry about scaling outreach for it.

Start focusing on doing marketing that users love.
I’m not talking necessarily about you doing the next Volvo ad or to be the next Old Spice guy. If you can then great, but these are out of reach for most of us. That doesn’t mean you can’t do marketing that people love. I often look at companies like Brewdog and Hawksmoor who do great marketing around their products but in a way that has personality and appeal. They don’t have to spend millions of dollars on celebrities or TV advertising because they have a great product and a fun marketing message. They have value to add which is the key, they don’t need to worry about link building because they get them naturally by doing cool stuff.

Whilst I know that “doing cool stuff” isn’t particularly actionable, I still think it’s fair to say that marketing needs to be loved. In order to do marketing that people love, you need to have some fun and focus on adding value.

Don’t bury your head in the sand
The worst thing you can do is ignore the trends and changes taking place. Google is changing, user expectations and behaviours are changing, our industry is changing. As an industry, we’ve adapted very well over the last few years. We have to keep doing this if we’re going to survive.

Going back to link building, you need to accept that this stuff is really hard and building the types of links that Google value is hard.

In summary
Links aren’t going anywhere. But the world is changing and we have to focus on what truly matters: marketing great products and building a loyal audience.

For more about link building or content marketing see:
http://omhub.wordpress.com/2014/10/08/the-future-of-link-building/

Link Building Tips page was posted “By Mike Armstrong”

SEO Tips

A recent post on Online Marketing Hub

The Future of Link Building

by christopherjanb
Posted by Paddy_Moogan

Building the types of links that help grow your online business and organic search traffic is getting harder. It used to be fairly straightforward, back before Google worked out how to treat links with different levels of quality and trust. However, the fact that it’s getting harder doesn’t mean that it’s dead.

What does the future hold?

I’m going to talk about links, but the truth is, the future isn’t really about the links. It is far bigger than that.

Quick sidenote: I’m aware that doing a blog post about the future of link building the week of a likely Penguin update could leave me with egg on my face! But we’ll see what happens.

Links will always be a ranking factor in some form or another. I can see the dials being turned down or off on certain aspects of links (more on that below) but I think they will always be there. Google is always looking for more data, more signals, more indicators of whether or not a certain page is a good result for a user at a certain moment in time. They will find them too, as we can see from
patents such as this. A natural consequence is that other signals may be diluted or even replaced as Google becomes smarter and understands the web and users a lot better.

What this means for the future is that the links valued by Google will be the ones you get as a result of having a great product and great marketing. Essentially, links will be symptomatic of amazing marketing. Hat tip to
Jess Champion who I’ve borrowed this term from.

This isn’t easy, but it shouldn’t be. That’s the point.

To go a bit further, I think we also need to think about the bigger picture. In the grand scheme of things, there are so many more signals that Google can use which, as marketers, we need to understand and use to our advantage. Google is changing and we can’t bury our heads in the sand and ignore what is going on.

A quick side note on spammy links
My background is a spammy one so I can’t help but address this quickly. Spam will continue to work for short-term hits and churn and burn websites. I’ve talked before about
my position on this so I won’t go into too much more detail here. I will say though that those people who are in the top 1% of spammers will continue to make money, but even for them, it will be hard to maintain over a long period of time.

Let’s move onto some more of the detail around my view of the future by first looking at the past and present.

What we’ve seen in the past
Google didn’t understand links.

The fundamental issue that Google had for a long, long time was that they didn’t understand enough about links. They didn’t understand things such as:

How much to trust a link
Whether a link was truly editorially given or not
Whether a link was paid for or not
If a link was genuinely high quality (PageRank isn’t perfect)
How relevant a link was
Whilst they still have work to do on all of these, they have gotten much better in recent years. At one time, a link was a link and it was pretty much a case of whoever had the most links, won. I think that for a long time, Google was trying very hard to understand links and find which ones were high quality, but there was so much noise that it was very difficult. I think that eventually they realised that they had to attack the problem from a different angle and
Penguin came along. So instead of focusing on finding the “good” signals of links, they focused on finding the “bad” signals and started to take action on them. This didn’t fix everything, but it did enough to shock our industry into moving away from certain tactics and therefore, has probably helped reduce a lot of the noise that Google was seeing.

What we’re seeing right now
Google is understanding more about language.

Google is getting better at understanding everything.
Hummingbird was just the start of what Google hopes to achieve on this front and it stands to reason that the same kind of technology that helps the following query work, will also help Google understand links better.

Not many people in the search industry said much when
Google hired this guy back in 2012. We can be pretty sure that it’s partly down to his work that we’re seeing the type of understanding of language that we are. His work has only just begun, though, and I think we’ll see more queries like the one above that just shouldn’t work, but they do. I also think we’ll see more instances of Googlers not knowing why something ranks where it does.

Google is understanding more about people.

I talk about this a little more below but to quickly summarise here, Google is learning more about us all the time. It can seem creepy, but the fact is that Google wants as much data as possible from us so that they can serve more relevant search results—and advertising of course. They are understanding more that the keywords we type into Google may not actually be what we want to find, nor are those keywords enough to find what we really want. Google needs more context.

Tom Anthony has
talked about this extensively so I won’t go into loads more detail. But to bring it back to link building, it is important to be aware of this because it means that there are more and more signals that could mean the dial on links gets turned down a bit more.

Some predictions about the future
I want to make a few things more concrete about my view of the future for link building, so let’s look at a few specifics.

1. Anchor text will matter less and less
Anchor text as a ranking signal was always something that works well in theory but not in reality. Even in my early days of link building, I couldn’t understand why Google put so much weight behind this one signal. My main reason for this view was that using exact match keywords in a link was not natural for most webmasters. I’d go as far as to say the only people who used it were SEOs!

I’m don’t think we’re at a point yet where anchor text as a ranking signal is dead and it will take some more time for Google to turn down the dial. But we definitely are at a point where you can get hurt pretty badly if you have too much commercial anchor text in your link profile. It just isn’t natural.

In the future, Google won’t need this signal. They will be much better at understanding the content of a page and importantly, the context of a page.

2. Deep linking will matter less and less
I was on the fence about this one for a long time but the more I think about it, the more I can see this happening. I’ll explain my view here by using an example.

Let’s imagine you’re an eCommerce website and you sell laptops. Obviously each laptop you sell will have its own product page and if you sell different types, you’ll probably have category pages too. With a products like laptops, chances are that other retailers sell the same ones with the same specifications and probably have very similar looking pages to yours. How does Google know which one to rank better than others?

Links to these product pages can work fine but in my opinion, is a bit of a crude way of working it out. I think that Google will get better at understanding the subtle differences in queries from users which will naturally mean that deep links to these laptop pages will be one of many signals they can use.

Take these queries:

“laptop reviews”

Context: I want to buy a laptop but I don’t know which one.

“asus laptop reviews”

Context: I like the sound of Asus, I want to read more about their laptops.

“sony laptop reviews”

Context: I also like the sound of Sony, I want to read more about their laptops.

“sony vs asus laptop”

Context: I’m confused, they both sound the same so I want a direct comparison to help me decide.

“asus laptop”

Context: I want an Asus laptop.

You can see how the mindset of the user has changed over time and we can easily imagine how the search results will have changed to reflect this. Google already understand this. There are other signals coming into play here too though, what about these bits of additional information that Google can gather about us:

Location: I’m on a bus in London, I may not want to buy a £1,000 laptop right now but I’ll happily research them.
Device: I’m on my iPhone 6, I may not want to input credit card details into it and I worry that the website I’m using won’t work well on a small screen.
Search history: I’ve searched for laptops before and visited several retailers, but I keep going back to the same one as I’ve ordered from them before.
These are just a few that are easy for us to imagine Google using. There are loads more that Google could look at, not to mention signals from the retailers themselves such as secure websites, user feedback, 3rd party reviews, trust signals etc.

When you start adding all of these signals together, it’s pretty easy to see why links to a specific product page may not be the strongest signal for Google to use when determining rankings.

Smaller companies will be able to compete more.

One of the things I loved about SEO when I first got into it was the fact that organic search felt like a level playing field. I knew that with the right work, I could beat massive companies in the search results and not have to spend a fortune doing it. Suffice to say, things have changed quite a bit now and there are some industries where you stand pretty much zero chance of competing unless you have a very big budget to spend and a great product.

I think we will see a shift back in the other direction and smaller companies with fewer links will be able to rank for certain types of queries with a certain type of context. As explained above, context is key and allows Google to serve up search results that meet the context of the user. This means that massive brands are not always going to be the right answer for users and Google have to get better at understanding this. Whether a company is classified as a “brand” or not can be subjective. My local craft beer shop in London is the only one in the world and if you were to ask 100 people if they’d heard of it, they’d all probably say no. But it’s a brand to me because I love their products, their staff are knowledgeable and helpful, their marketing is cool and I’d always recommend them.

Sometimes, showing the website of this shop above bigger brands in search results is the right thing to do for a user. Google need lots of additional signals beyond “branding” and links in order to do this but I think they will get them.

What all of this means for us
Predicting the future is hard, knowing what to do about it is pretty hard too! But here are some things that I think we should be doing.

Ask really hard questions
Marketing is hard. If you or your client wants to compete and win customers, then you need to be prepared to ask really hard questions about the company. Here are just a few that I’ve found difficult when talking to clients:
Why does the company exist? (A good answer has nothing to do with making money)
Why do you deserve to rank well in Google?
What makes you different to your competitors?
If you disappeared from Google tomorrow, would anyone notice?
Why do you deserve to be linked to?
What value do you provide for users?
The answers to these won’t always give you that silver bullet, but they can provoke conversations that make the client look inwardly and at why they should deserve links and customers. These questions are hard to answer, but again, that’s the point.

Stop looking for scalable link building tactics
Seriously, just stop. Anything that can be scaled tends to lose quality and anything that scales is likely to be targeted by the Google webspam team at some point.

A recent piece of content we did at Distilled has so far generated links from over 700 root domains—we did NOT send 700 outreach emails! This piece took on a life of its own and generated those links after some promotion by us, but at no point did we worry about scaling outreach for it.

Start focusing on doing marketing that users love.
I’m not talking necessarily about you doing the next Volvo ad or to be the next Old Spice guy. If you can then great, but these are out of reach for most of us. That doesn’t mean you can’t do marketing that people love. I often look at companies like Brewdog and Hawksmoor who do great marketing around their products but in a way that has personality and appeal. They don’t have to spend millions of dollars on celebrities or TV advertising because they have a great product and a fun marketing message. They have value to add which is the key, they don’t need to worry about link building because they get them naturally by doing cool stuff.

Whilst I know that “doing cool stuff” isn’t particularly actionable, I still think it’s fair to say that marketing needs to be loved. In order to do marketing that people love, you need to have some fun and focus on adding value.

Don’t bury your head in the sand
The worst thing you can do is ignore the trends and changes taking place. Google is changing, user expectations and behaviours are changing, our industry is changing. As an industry, we’ve adapted very well over the last few years. We have to keep doing this if we’re going to survive.

Going back to link building, you need to accept that this stuff is really hard and building the types of links that Google value is hard.

In summary
Links aren’t going anywhere. But the world is changing and we have to focus on what truly matters: marketing great products and building a loyal audience.

For more about link building or content marketing see:
http://omhub.wordpress.com/2014/10/08/the-future-of-link-building/

SEO Tips page was posted “By Mike Armstrong”

Link Building

A recent post on Online Marketing Hub

The Future of Link Building

by christopherjanb
Posted by Paddy_Moogan

Building the types of links that help grow your online business and organic search traffic is getting harder. It used to be fairly straightforward, back before Google worked out how to treat links with different levels of quality and trust. However, the fact that it’s getting harder doesn’t mean that it’s dead.

What does the future hold?

I’m going to talk about links, but the truth is, the future isn’t really about the links. It is far bigger than that.

Quick sidenote: I’m aware that doing a blog post about the future of link building the week of a likely Penguin update could leave me with egg on my face! But we’ll see what happens.

Links will always be a ranking factor in some form or another. I can see the dials being turned down or off on certain aspects of links (more on that below) but I think they will always be there. Google is always looking for more data, more signals, more indicators of whether or not a certain page is a good result for a user at a certain moment in time. They will find them too, as we can see from
patents such as this. A natural consequence is that other signals may be diluted or even replaced as Google becomes smarter and understands the web and users a lot better.

What this means for the future is that the links valued by Google will be the ones you get as a result of having a great product and great marketing. Essentially, links will be symptomatic of amazing marketing. Hat tip to
Jess Champion who I’ve borrowed this term from.

This isn’t easy, but it shouldn’t be. That’s the point.

To go a bit further, I think we also need to think about the bigger picture. In the grand scheme of things, there are so many more signals that Google can use which, as marketers, we need to understand and use to our advantage. Google is changing and we can’t bury our heads in the sand and ignore what is going on.

A quick side note on spammy links
My background is a spammy one so I can’t help but address this quickly. Spam will continue to work for short-term hits and churn and burn websites. I’ve talked before about
my position on this so I won’t go into too much more detail here. I will say though that those people who are in the top 1% of spammers will continue to make money, but even for them, it will be hard to maintain over a long period of time.

Let’s move onto some more of the detail around my view of the future by first looking at the past and present.

What we’ve seen in the past
Google didn’t understand links.

The fundamental issue that Google had for a long, long time was that they didn’t understand enough about links. They didn’t understand things such as:

How much to trust a link
Whether a link was truly editorially given or not
Whether a link was paid for or not
If a link was genuinely high quality (PageRank isn’t perfect)
How relevant a link was
Whilst they still have work to do on all of these, they have gotten much better in recent years. At one time, a link was a link and it was pretty much a case of whoever had the most links, won. I think that for a long time, Google was trying very hard to understand links and find which ones were high quality, but there was so much noise that it was very difficult. I think that eventually they realised that they had to attack the problem from a different angle and
Penguin came along. So instead of focusing on finding the “good” signals of links, they focused on finding the “bad” signals and started to take action on them. This didn’t fix everything, but it did enough to shock our industry into moving away from certain tactics and therefore, has probably helped reduce a lot of the noise that Google was seeing.

What we’re seeing right now
Google is understanding more about language.

Google is getting better at understanding everything.
Hummingbird was just the start of what Google hopes to achieve on this front and it stands to reason that the same kind of technology that helps the following query work, will also help Google understand links better.

Not many people in the search industry said much when
Google hired this guy back in 2012. We can be pretty sure that it’s partly down to his work that we’re seeing the type of understanding of language that we are. His work has only just begun, though, and I think we’ll see more queries like the one above that just shouldn’t work, but they do. I also think we’ll see more instances of Googlers not knowing why something ranks where it does.

Google is understanding more about people.

I talk about this a little more below but to quickly summarise here, Google is learning more about us all the time. It can seem creepy, but the fact is that Google wants as much data as possible from us so that they can serve more relevant search results—and advertising of course. They are understanding more that the keywords we type into Google may not actually be what we want to find, nor are those keywords enough to find what we really want. Google needs more context.

Tom Anthony has
talked about this extensively so I won’t go into loads more detail. But to bring it back to link building, it is important to be aware of this because it means that there are more and more signals that could mean the dial on links gets turned down a bit more.

Some predictions about the future
I want to make a few things more concrete about my view of the future for link building, so let’s look at a few specifics.

1. Anchor text will matter less and less
Anchor text as a ranking signal was always something that works well in theory but not in reality. Even in my early days of link building, I couldn’t understand why Google put so much weight behind this one signal. My main reason for this view was that using exact match keywords in a link was not natural for most webmasters. I’d go as far as to say the only people who used it were SEOs!

I’m don’t think we’re at a point yet where anchor text as a ranking signal is dead and it will take some more time for Google to turn down the dial. But we definitely are at a point where you can get hurt pretty badly if you have too much commercial anchor text in your link profile. It just isn’t natural.

In the future, Google won’t need this signal. They will be much better at understanding the content of a page and importantly, the context of a page.

2. Deep linking will matter less and less
I was on the fence about this one for a long time but the more I think about it, the more I can see this happening. I’ll explain my view here by using an example.

Let’s imagine you’re an eCommerce website and you sell laptops. Obviously each laptop you sell will have its own product page and if you sell different types, you’ll probably have category pages too. With a products like laptops, chances are that other retailers sell the same ones with the same specifications and probably have very similar looking pages to yours. How does Google know which one to rank better than others?

Links to these product pages can work fine but in my opinion, is a bit of a crude way of working it out. I think that Google will get better at understanding the subtle differences in queries from users which will naturally mean that deep links to these laptop pages will be one of many signals they can use.

Take these queries:

“laptop reviews”

Context: I want to buy a laptop but I don’t know which one.

“asus laptop reviews”

Context: I like the sound of Asus, I want to read more about their laptops.

“sony laptop reviews”

Context: I also like the sound of Sony, I want to read more about their laptops.

“sony vs asus laptop”

Context: I’m confused, they both sound the same so I want a direct comparison to help me decide.

“asus laptop”

Context: I want an Asus laptop.

You can see how the mindset of the user has changed over time and we can easily imagine how the search results will have changed to reflect this. Google already understand this. There are other signals coming into play here too though, what about these bits of additional information that Google can gather about us:

Location: I’m on a bus in London, I may not want to buy a £1,000 laptop right now but I’ll happily research them.
Device: I’m on my iPhone 6, I may not want to input credit card details into it and I worry that the website I’m using won’t work well on a small screen.
Search history: I’ve searched for laptops before and visited several retailers, but I keep going back to the same one as I’ve ordered from them before.
These are just a few that are easy for us to imagine Google using. There are loads more that Google could look at, not to mention signals from the retailers themselves such as secure websites, user feedback, 3rd party reviews, trust signals etc.

When you start adding all of these signals together, it’s pretty easy to see why links to a specific product page may not be the strongest signal for Google to use when determining rankings.

Smaller companies will be able to compete more.

One of the things I loved about SEO when I first got into it was the fact that organic search felt like a level playing field. I knew that with the right work, I could beat massive companies in the search results and not have to spend a fortune doing it. Suffice to say, things have changed quite a bit now and there are some industries where you stand pretty much zero chance of competing unless you have a very big budget to spend and a great product.

I think we will see a shift back in the other direction and smaller companies with fewer links will be able to rank for certain types of queries with a certain type of context. As explained above, context is key and allows Google to serve up search results that meet the context of the user. This means that massive brands are not always going to be the right answer for users and Google have to get better at understanding this. Whether a company is classified as a “brand” or not can be subjective. My local craft beer shop in London is the only one in the world and if you were to ask 100 people if they’d heard of it, they’d all probably say no. But it’s a brand to me because I love their products, their staff are knowledgeable and helpful, their marketing is cool and I’d always recommend them.

Sometimes, showing the website of this shop above bigger brands in search results is the right thing to do for a user. Google need lots of additional signals beyond “branding” and links in order to do this but I think they will get them.

What all of this means for us
Predicting the future is hard, knowing what to do about it is pretty hard too! But here are some things that I think we should be doing.

Ask really hard questions
Marketing is hard. If you or your client wants to compete and win customers, then you need to be prepared to ask really hard questions about the company. Here are just a few that I’ve found difficult when talking to clients:
Why does the company exist? (A good answer has nothing to do with making money)
Why do you deserve to rank well in Google?
What makes you different to your competitors?
If you disappeared from Google tomorrow, would anyone notice?
Why do you deserve to be linked to?
What value do you provide for users?
The answers to these won’t always give you that silver bullet, but they can provoke conversations that make the client look inwardly and at why they should deserve links and customers. These questions are hard to answer, but again, that’s the point.

Stop looking for scalable link building tactics
Seriously, just stop. Anything that can be scaled tends to lose quality and anything that scales is likely to be targeted by the Google webspam team at some point.

A recent piece of content we did at Distilled has so far generated links from over 700 root domains—we did NOT send 700 outreach emails! This piece took on a life of its own and generated those links after some promotion by us, but at no point did we worry about scaling outreach for it.

Start focusing on doing marketing that users love.
I’m not talking necessarily about you doing the next Volvo ad or to be the next Old Spice guy. If you can then great, but these are out of reach for most of us. That doesn’t mean you can’t do marketing that people love. I often look at companies like Brewdog and Hawksmoor who do great marketing around their products but in a way that has personality and appeal. They don’t have to spend millions of dollars on celebrities or TV advertising because they have a great product and a fun marketing message. They have value to add which is the key, they don’t need to worry about link building because they get them naturally by doing cool stuff.

Whilst I know that “doing cool stuff” isn’t particularly actionable, I still think it’s fair to say that marketing needs to be loved. In order to do marketing that people love, you need to have some fun and focus on adding value.

Don’t bury your head in the sand
The worst thing you can do is ignore the trends and changes taking place. Google is changing, user expectations and behaviours are changing, our industry is changing. As an industry, we’ve adapted very well over the last few years. We have to keep doing this if we’re going to survive.

Going back to link building, you need to accept that this stuff is really hard and building the types of links that Google value is hard.

In summary
Links aren’t going anywhere. But the world is changing and we have to focus on what truly matters: marketing great products and building a loyal audience.

For more about link building or content marketing see:
http://omhub.wordpress.com/2014/10/08/the-future-of-link-building/

Link Building page was posted “By Mike Armstrong”

The Future of Link Building – SEO Tips

A recent post on Online Marketing Hub

The Future of Link Building

by christopherjanb
Posted by Paddy_Moogan

Building the types of links that help grow your online business and organic search traffic is getting harder. It used to be fairly straightforward, back before Google worked out how to treat links with different levels of quality and trust. However, the fact that it’s getting harder doesn’t mean that it’s dead.

What does the future hold?

I’m going to talk about links, but the truth is, the future isn’t really about the links. It is far bigger than that.

Quick sidenote: I’m aware that doing a blog post about the future of link building the week of a likely Penguin update could leave me with egg on my face! But we’ll see what happens.

Links will always be a ranking factor in some form or another. I can see the dials being turned down or off on certain aspects of links (more on that below) but I think they will always be there. Google is always looking for more data, more signals, more indicators of whether or not a certain page is a good result for a user at a certain moment in time. They will find them too, as we can see from
patents such as this. A natural consequence is that other signals may be diluted or even replaced as Google becomes smarter and understands the web and users a lot better.

What this means for the future is that the links valued by Google will be the ones you get as a result of having a great product and great marketing. Essentially, links will be symptomatic of amazing marketing. Hat tip to
Jess Champion who I’ve borrowed this term from.

This isn’t easy, but it shouldn’t be. That’s the point.

To go a bit further, I think we also need to think about the bigger picture. In the grand scheme of things, there are so many more signals that Google can use which, as marketers, we need to understand and use to our advantage. Google is changing and we can’t bury our heads in the sand and ignore what is going on.

A quick side note on spammy links
My background is a spammy one so I can’t help but address this quickly. Spam will continue to work for short-term hits and churn and burn websites. I’ve talked before about
my position on this so I won’t go into too much more detail here. I will say though that those people who are in the top 1% of spammers will continue to make money, but even for them, it will be hard to maintain over a long period of time.

Let’s move onto some more of the detail around my view of the future by first looking at the past and present.

What we’ve seen in the past
Google didn’t understand links.

The fundamental issue that Google had for a long, long time was that they didn’t understand enough about links. They didn’t understand things such as:

How much to trust a link
Whether a link was truly editorially given or not
Whether a link was paid for or not
If a link was genuinely high quality (PageRank isn’t perfect)
How relevant a link was
Whilst they still have work to do on all of these, they have gotten much better in recent years. At one time, a link was a link and it was pretty much a case of whoever had the most links, won. I think that for a long time, Google was trying very hard to understand links and find which ones were high quality, but there was so much noise that it was very difficult. I think that eventually they realised that they had to attack the problem from a different angle and
Penguin came along. So instead of focusing on finding the “good” signals of links, they focused on finding the “bad” signals and started to take action on them. This didn’t fix everything, but it did enough to shock our industry into moving away from certain tactics and therefore, has probably helped reduce a lot of the noise that Google was seeing.

What we’re seeing right now
Google is understanding more about language.

Google is getting better at understanding everything.
Hummingbird was just the start of what Google hopes to achieve on this front and it stands to reason that the same kind of technology that helps the following query work, will also help Google understand links better.

Not many people in the search industry said much when
Google hired this guy back in 2012. We can be pretty sure that it’s partly down to his work that we’re seeing the type of understanding of language that we are. His work has only just begun, though, and I think we’ll see more queries like the one above that just shouldn’t work, but they do. I also think we’ll see more instances of Googlers not knowing why something ranks where it does.

Google is understanding more about people.

I talk about this a little more below but to quickly summarise here, Google is learning more about us all the time. It can seem creepy, but the fact is that Google wants as much data as possible from us so that they can serve more relevant search results—and advertising of course. They are understanding more that the keywords we type into Google may not actually be what we want to find, nor are those keywords enough to find what we really want. Google needs more context.

Tom Anthony has
talked about this extensively so I won’t go into loads more detail. But to bring it back to link building, it is important to be aware of this because it means that there are more and more signals that could mean the dial on links gets turned down a bit more.

Some predictions about the future
I want to make a few things more concrete about my view of the future for link building, so let’s look at a few specifics.

1. Anchor text will matter less and less
Anchor text as a ranking signal was always something that works well in theory but not in reality. Even in my early days of link building, I couldn’t understand why Google put so much weight behind this one signal. My main reason for this view was that using exact match keywords in a link was not natural for most webmasters. I’d go as far as to say the only people who used it were SEOs!

I’m don’t think we’re at a point yet where anchor text as a ranking signal is dead and it will take some more time for Google to turn down the dial. But we definitely are at a point where you can get hurt pretty badly if you have too much commercial anchor text in your link profile. It just isn’t natural.

In the future, Google won’t need this signal. They will be much better at understanding the content of a page and importantly, the context of a page.

2. Deep linking will matter less and less
I was on the fence about this one for a long time but the more I think about it, the more I can see this happening. I’ll explain my view here by using an example.

Let’s imagine you’re an eCommerce website and you sell laptops. Obviously each laptop you sell will have its own product page and if you sell different types, you’ll probably have category pages too. With a products like laptops, chances are that other retailers sell the same ones with the same specifications and probably have very similar looking pages to yours. How does Google know which one to rank better than others?

Links to these product pages can work fine but in my opinion, is a bit of a crude way of working it out. I think that Google will get better at understanding the subtle differences in queries from users which will naturally mean that deep links to these laptop pages will be one of many signals they can use.

Take these queries:

“laptop reviews”

Context: I want to buy a laptop but I don’t know which one.

“asus laptop reviews”

Context: I like the sound of Asus, I want to read more about their laptops.

“sony laptop reviews”

Context: I also like the sound of Sony, I want to read more about their laptops.

“sony vs asus laptop”

Context: I’m confused, they both sound the same so I want a direct comparison to help me decide.

“asus laptop”

Context: I want an Asus laptop.

You can see how the mindset of the user has changed over time and we can easily imagine how the search results will have changed to reflect this. Google already understand this. There are other signals coming into play here too though, what about these bits of additional information that Google can gather about us:

Location: I’m on a bus in London, I may not want to buy a £1,000 laptop right now but I’ll happily research them.
Device: I’m on my iPhone 6, I may not want to input credit card details into it and I worry that the website I’m using won’t work well on a small screen.
Search history: I’ve searched for laptops before and visited several retailers, but I keep going back to the same one as I’ve ordered from them before.
These are just a few that are easy for us to imagine Google using. There are loads more that Google could look at, not to mention signals from the retailers themselves such as secure websites, user feedback, 3rd party reviews, trust signals etc.

When you start adding all of these signals together, it’s pretty easy to see why links to a specific product page may not be the strongest signal for Google to use when determining rankings.

Smaller companies will be able to compete more.

One of the things I loved about SEO when I first got into it was the fact that organic search felt like a level playing field. I knew that with the right work, I could beat massive companies in the search results and not have to spend a fortune doing it. Suffice to say, things have changed quite a bit now and there are some industries where you stand pretty much zero chance of competing unless you have a very big budget to spend and a great product.

I think we will see a shift back in the other direction and smaller companies with fewer links will be able to rank for certain types of queries with a certain type of context. As explained above, context is key and allows Google to serve up search results that meet the context of the user. This means that massive brands are not always going to be the right answer for users and Google have to get better at understanding this. Whether a company is classified as a “brand” or not can be subjective. My local craft beer shop in London is the only one in the world and if you were to ask 100 people if they’d heard of it, they’d all probably say no. But it’s a brand to me because I love their products, their staff are knowledgeable and helpful, their marketing is cool and I’d always recommend them.

Sometimes, showing the website of this shop above bigger brands in search results is the right thing to do for a user. Google need lots of additional signals beyond “branding” and links in order to do this but I think they will get them.

What all of this means for us
Predicting the future is hard, knowing what to do about it is pretty hard too! But here are some things that I think we should be doing.

Ask really hard questions
Marketing is hard. If you or your client wants to compete and win customers, then you need to be prepared to ask really hard questions about the company. Here are just a few that I’ve found difficult when talking to clients:
Why does the company exist? (A good answer has nothing to do with making money)
Why do you deserve to rank well in Google?
What makes you different to your competitors?
If you disappeared from Google tomorrow, would anyone notice?
Why do you deserve to be linked to?
What value do you provide for users?
The answers to these won’t always give you that silver bullet, but they can provoke conversations that make the client look inwardly and at why they should deserve links and customers. These questions are hard to answer, but again, that’s the point.

Stop looking for scalable link building tactics
Seriously, just stop. Anything that can be scaled tends to lose quality and anything that scales is likely to be targeted by the Google webspam team at some point.

A recent piece of content we did at Distilled has so far generated links from over 700 root domains—we did NOT send 700 outreach emails! This piece took on a life of its own and generated those links after some promotion by us, but at no point did we worry about scaling outreach for it.

Start focusing on doing marketing that users love.
I’m not talking necessarily about you doing the next Volvo ad or to be the next Old Spice guy. If you can then great, but these are out of reach for most of us. That doesn’t mean you can’t do marketing that people love. I often look at companies like Brewdog and Hawksmoor who do great marketing around their products but in a way that has personality and appeal. They don’t have to spend millions of dollars on celebrities or TV advertising because they have a great product and a fun marketing message. They have value to add which is the key, they don’t need to worry about link building because they get them naturally by doing cool stuff.

Whilst I know that “doing cool stuff” isn’t particularly actionable, I still think it’s fair to say that marketing needs to be loved. In order to do marketing that people love, you need to have some fun and focus on adding value.

Don’t bury your head in the sand
The worst thing you can do is ignore the trends and changes taking place. Google is changing, user expectations and behaviours are changing, our industry is changing. As an industry, we’ve adapted very well over the last few years. We have to keep doing this if we’re going to survive.

Going back to link building, you need to accept that this stuff is really hard and building the types of links that Google value is hard.

In summary
Links aren’t going anywhere. But the world is changing and we have to focus on what truly matters: marketing great products and building a loyal audience.

For more about link building or content marketing see:
http://omhub.wordpress.com/2014/10/08/the-future-of-link-building/

The Future of Link Building – SEO Tips page was posted “By Mike Armstrong”