Category: Marketing Services Cardiff

Is Snapchat Gaming and New Revenue Opportunities for Snap Arriving Next Month?

When Snap holds its inaugural content and developer summit next month, the event itself won’t be only new addition to the company’s slate. The marquee announcement for the April 4th event is expected to be a gaming platform, hosting a number of externally developed games on the continually innovating app.

Rumors of Snap’s venture into gaming have been swirling since last year, when Chinese company Tencent (WeChat’s parent company, and owners of the wildly popular League of Legends) acquired a 12% stake in Snap. Tencent is reportedly looking to make up a slight loss in revenue, resulting in tighter regulations in its home country. As Engadget points out, “working with Snap in other regions might make sense” for that reason. Speculation intensified when they acquired Prettygreat, the Australian company responsible for runaway gaming successes Fruit Ninja and Jetpack Joyride. In partnering with these proven entities, Snap is undoubtedly looking to make a big splash in this space next month.

The splash is an understandable one for them to wish to make; while Snap has struggled to hold on to users in recent years, a proper move into gaming (following its 2018 Snappables venture) could provide additional opportunities to both increase users and monetization opportunities. To the former, the cache of brands like Prettygreat and Tencent could mean that truly engaging gaming is coming to the platform. Not to mention, as The Verge put it, “users who play games in the Snapchat app aren’t browsing [major rival] Instagram.” And to the latter, a combination of in-app purchases and more ad placement slots could send more money Snap’s way.

The impending summit also promises a new slate of original programming, following the initially announced slate back in October 2018. And indeed, this foray into gaming – while not unique to Snapchat, given Facebook Messenger’s gaming tab and a rumored announcement from Google on its own gaming aspirations – does expand Snap Head of Original Programming Nick Bell’s assertion that Snap is less a social media platform, and more of an entertainment company. If this gambit pays off, it’ll admirably cement its status as the latter.

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The post Is Snapchat Gaming and New Revenue Opportunities for Snap Arriving Next Month? appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/03/is-snapchat-gaming-and-new-revenue-opportunities-for-snap-arriving-next-month/

Small Advertisers Took the Biggest Losses During Facebook’s Recent Outage

Last week’s long and vaguely explained Facebook outage left millions of users globally without reliable access to not only the main platform but also other Facebook-owned properties like Instagram, WhatsApp, and Facebook Messenger. It was an inconvenience for countless people, but for advertisers, it hurt a bottom line – and that pain was especially pronounced for small businesses.

During the massive “server configuration change” that rendered the platforms inaccessible, previously purchased ad campaigns couldn’t be reliably seen, nor could they be paused should an advertiser wish to delay them until they were guaranteed visibility. Social Outlier’s David Hermann told AdWeek, “advertisers were charged thousands of dollars for ads that ran during the outage”; those ads running largely unseen amounted to “an absolute mess” for small businesses, for whom an ad spend removes precious funding from the coffers. A commonly cited loss among advertisers and media buyers was $10,000, though Hermann mentioned one who spent $17,000. “For a small business, that’s a pretty big hit.”

The Verge correctly notes that Facebook “anticipates events like this and doesn’t charge advertisers for campaigns unless specific results are achieved,” which means that individual ad buyers likely don’t lose actual revenue during outages or challenges like this. But for smaller media buyers (whose payment depends on these ads reaching their set objectives) this hurts their ability to be effective. And as the second biggest online ad buyer next to Google, it’s perfectly reasonable to hope that communication from – and refund processing by – the company would be easier to come by.

The lack of communication from Facebook was especially frustrating to The Verge’s T.C. Sottek, who wondered aloud with colleagues “how it was possible that the largest and most influential technology company in the world could have a day-long service disruption and basically say nothing about it except for a curt and cryptic tweet.” Voy Media’s Kevin Urrutia mentioned he “felt hopeless watching campaigns that he was unable to pause charge advertisers,” with no explanation from the company for the problem. Larger media buyers, who understandably provide a larger share of Facebook’s ad revenue, reported a far different experience of regular updates. This differentiation should be troubling for small businesses.

Another troubling observation? It doesn’t feel like Facebook has an incentive to alter this mentality. “Buyers said they don’t usually shift their budgets when events like this happen, which may explain why the problems persist,” Digiday reported in October 2018, after the previous record outage of the Facebook Ad Manager platform. That is to say, if advertisers won’t leave the platform after these sorts of incidents, what reason does Facebook have to change their tune—or apologize for the sour notes they seem to be hitting with increasing regularity as a company? There may not be a clear answer to this question, but advertisers and media buyers are ready to bury the proverbial hatchet whenever Facebook is. “We love Facebook, but it’s just one of those things,” Urrutia told AdWeek. Turning his focus to the platform for a moment, he went on: “It’d be nice if you were nicer to your advertisers.”

In addition to the Paid Social Summit, Social Media Week New York will feature several sessions on how to make the most of your social ad buys. There’s still time to join us next month at a discount off the walkup price!

The post Small Advertisers Took the Biggest Losses During Facebook’s Recent Outage appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/03/small-advertisers-took-the-biggest-losses-during-facebooks-recent-outage/

How Data & AI Are Shaping the Future of Storytelling

It’s safe to say artificial intelligence is no longer a buzzword and well on its way to permeating virtually every industry. In 2018, verticals like healthcare, legal, automobile, and agriculture leveraged machine learning and AI-driven platforms, tools, and applications to bring efficiency to their operations, fuel new innovations, and enhance customer experience.

In 2019 and beyond, this rapid growth is expected to continue as companies aim to extract further value and competitive gains from the data they gather.

By 2022, research firm Gartner forecasts that AI-derived business value will approach $3.9 trillion and decision support and augmentation AI technology will represent 44 percent of the total global AI market value.

How can we use data to better tell the stories that highlight our brands as the go-to options for our audiences? What are the best practices for testing and optimizing our stories? How can we utilize AI to understand competitors’ movements, personalize campaigns, and integrate the pioneering changes of the digital landscape into our storytelling tactics?

At #SMWNYC the world’s leading storytellers and brands will come together to grapple with these burning questions amongst others as part of our 2019 theme. Names to bookmark include Postmates, Entrepreneur, Linqia, Sprinklr, and Huge, whose panels will encompass a variety of tracks such as Data Decision Making, AI vs. Humanity, and the Future of Brands.

There’s still time to join these speakers and many more in New York this spring (April 30-May 2, at the Sheraton New York Times Square) at 10% off the walkup price– so act fast, and look toward a future of data-driven storytelling with us!

Join 100,000+ fellow marketers who advance their skills and knowledge by subscribing to our weekly newsletter.

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The post How Data & AI Are Shaping the Future of Storytelling appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/03/how-data-ai-are-shaping-the-future-of-storytelling/

How Data & AI Are Shaping the Future of Storytelling

It’s safe to say artificial intelligence is no longer a buzzword and well on its way to permeating virtually every industry. In 2018, verticals like healthcare, legal, automobile, and agriculture leveraged machine learning and AI-driven platforms, tools, and applications to bring efficiency to their operations, fuel new innovations, and enhance customer experience.

In 2019 and beyond, this rapid growth is expected to continue as companies aim to extract further value and competitive gains from the data they gather.

By 2022, research firm Gartner forecasts that AI-derived business value will approach $3.9 trillion and decision support and augmentation AI technology will represent 44 percent of the total global AI market value.

How can we use data to better tell the stories that highlight our brands as the go-to options for our audiences? What are the best practices for testing and optimizing our stories? How can we utilize AI to understand competitors’ movements, personalize campaigns, and integrate the pioneering changes of the digital landscape into our storytelling tactics?

At #SMWNYC the world’s leading storytellers and brands will come together to grapple with these burning questions amongst others as part of our 2019 theme. Names to bookmark include Postmates, Entrepreneur, Linqia, Sprinklr, and Huge, whose panels will encompass a variety of tracks such as Data Decision Making, AI vs. Humanity, and the Future of Brands.

There’s still time to join these speakers and many more in New York this spring (April 30-May 2, at the Sheraton New York Times Square) at 10% off the walkup price– so act fast, and look toward a future of data-driven storytelling with us!

Join 100,000+ fellow marketers who advance their skills and knowledge by subscribing to our weekly newsletter.

WATCH OUR 2019 PROMO

The post How Data & AI Are Shaping the Future of Storytelling appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/03/how-data-ai-are-shaping-the-future-of-storytelling/

Periscope’s Latest Update Cracks Down on Fake Engagement

Anywhere that engagement metrics like favorites, shares, and hearts can be used to signal success, ways to “fake” these numbers aren’t too far behind. Periscope is the latest platform to crack down on these faking and spamming efforts, as they revealed this week in a company Medium post.

“Periscope is a place for instant engagement and we’ve heard your concerns about spammy accounts and chats,” they said to open their statement. Indeed, Periscope users had been reporting artificial hearts, followers, viewers, and chats for quite some time. And while the company’s 2016 measures to cut down on spam viewers and commenters were successful in curbing abuse and noise on the platform, many of these “fakes” persisted—with the help of YouTube videos and other tutorials to further the practice.

But by finding ways to conflate spam engagement and fake engagement, this new policy seems to give their management efforts new heft and meaning. “Any artificial hearts, chats, followers and views violate our spam rules, and so will selling or promoting fake engagement,” the company said. To make the reporting process easier when these behaviors do arrive, “[Periscope] also focusing on proactive enforcement to help make chat quality better, and will soon launch account-level spam reporting options to let you report spammy behavior more easily.”

The last company to take such aggressive action on fake accounts was Instagram, who removed thousands of accounts en masse to contain the problem in November 2018. The move was remarkable at the time, and frankly continues to be; a number of other platforms have failed to take meaningful measures to control spam or fake accounts. As we’re learning, these efforts can contribute not only to inflated viewer numbers, but an inflated sense of influence for those accounts – contributing to misinformation or misplaced online authority. By taking on this issue so pointedly, Periscope is standing apart from other platforms that shy away from the issue…including its parent company, Twitter.

“We are always looking for ways to make Periscope feel safer and more authentic for our community,” the company’s Medium post concluded. It’ll be interesting to see how these latest measures affect the Periscope user experience, as well as if it’ll push other platforms to be similarly stringent in managing the scourge of fake accounts and engagement.

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The post Periscope’s Latest Update Cracks Down on Fake Engagement appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/03/periscopes-latest-update-cracks-down-on-fake-engagement/

How to Tell Empathetic Stories with Mid-Funnel Messaging

The term “funnel” has been an integral part of marketing lexicon for decades, serving as a strong gauge of consumer interest. While traditionally strategies have favored the top portion of the buyer journey — emphasizing tangible offers and rewards as simple ways to attract attention and drive conversions — social media and mobile have added noticeable pressure to such practices. As a result, today’s content marketers are forced to reevaluate their approach and think beyond commoditized offers in order to compete.

Register for your pass at 10% off and save $250!

During #SMWNYC, Chris Marino, Director, Digital Media Acquisition at American Express, will share insights into how the company is a living, breathing example of a group facing this precise challenge and how they’ve shifted the perception of their brand as more than credit cards by looking to the middle portion of the buyer experience. Pointing to a recent campaign, he’ll describe ways to unlock mid-funnel messaging to deliver empathetic stories that resonate across a multitude of complimentary channels.

Other brands to look out for at the conference weighing in on the evolution of storytelling discussion include Campbell Snacks, T-Mobile, Adobe, Salesforce, Diageo, Under Armour and IBM.

There’s still time to join these speakers and many more in New York this spring (April 30-May 2, at the Sheraton New York Times Square) at 10% off the walkup price– so act fast, and look toward a future of empathetic stories with us!

Join 100,000+ fellow marketers who advance their skills and knowledge by subscribing to our weekly newsletter.

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The post How to Tell Empathetic Stories with Mid-Funnel Messaging appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/03/how-to-tell-empathetic-stories-with-mid-funnel-messaging/

How to Tell Empathetic Stories with Mid-Funnel Messaging

The term “funnel” has been an integral part of marketing lexicon for decades, serving as a strong gauge of consumer interest. While traditionally strategies have favored the top portion of the buyer journey — emphasizing tangible offers and rewards as simple ways to attract attention and drive conversions — social media and mobile have added noticeable pressure to such practices. As a result, today’s content marketers are forced to reevaluate their approach and think beyond commoditized offers in order to compete.

Register for your pass at 10% off and save $250!

During #SMWNYC, Chris Marino, Director, Digital Media Acquisition at American Express, will share insights into how the company is a living, breathing example of a group facing this precise challenge and how they’ve shifted the perception of their brand as more than credit cards by looking to the middle portion of the buyer experience. Pointing to a recent campaign, he’ll describe ways to unlock mid-funnel messaging to deliver empathetic stories that resonate across a multitude of complimentary channels.

Other brands to look out for at the conference weighing in on the evolution of storytelling discussion include Campbell Snacks, T-Mobile, Adobe, Salesforce, Diageo, Under Armour and IBM.

There’s still time to join these speakers and many more in New York this spring (April 30-May 2, at the Sheraton New York Times Square) at 10% off the walkup price– so act fast, and look toward a future of empathetic stories with us!

Join 100,000+ fellow marketers who advance their skills and knowledge by subscribing to our weekly newsletter.

WATCH OUR 2019 PROMO

The post How to Tell Empathetic Stories with Mid-Funnel Messaging appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/03/how-to-tell-empathetic-stories-with-mid-funnel-messaging/

3 Tips for Staying Social When Social Is Down

The struggle was real yesterday, as outages plagued users of Facebook, Instagram, and WhatsApp. And that struggle impacted not just typical users, but brands as well; Recode estimates that $189 million of revenue were lost as a result of fewer eyeballs on ad content. We all (predictably) made it through alive, but it brought about some stark observations. Lots of communication, and business, is disrupted when these sites are down. Lots of users will flock to Twitter as a seeming last resort for broadcasting their thoughts. And lots of brands missed an opportunity to reach out through other forms of media:

Trish is right. We saw the blockbuster moment that Oreo had on Twitter, addressing a different type of outage—the 2017 Super Bowl power outage—with a beautifully timed tweet. But where were these moments on other platforms during the Facebook outage?

This has happened before, and it will happen again. How will your brand take advantage of the time to reach customers in other ways? We’ve got a few ideas to share:

Email

Cultivating a strong email list is a major cornerstone of strategy; consumers who purchase products through email spend 138% more than those that don’t receive email offers. And yet, like Trish, I saw regrettably few emails acknowledging the outage or creating engagement opportunities that would have otherwise taken place on social. A flash deal or coupon with a joke about the situation could go a long way in endearing you to your customer base (“we, too, are struggling without it!”) and keeps your efforts to stay present in customers’ minds current.

What offer could you present to your email list in a pinch? Keep a few options in your drafts, and when the directive comes down (or goes down, as the case may be), you’ll be ready to capture attention in another way.

Phone (yes, really!)

When was the last time you talked to your customers? Really talked? Sometimes we feel like we’re getting all the information we need from our social channels. And customers tend to feel the same, which is why social media is increasingly important to the resolution of customer complaints. But odds are, we’ll hear different details when we connect with people in new ways. It could be valuable to take advantage of this platform downtime to seek out these different details- to reach out, rather than waiting to hear from them.

No need to make it a long call, think of it as a “just checking in” opportunity designed to solicit quick feedback. Particularly if you have a segment of clients you’re curious about—power users, lapsed customers, etc.—it could be a good way to ask questions that you may not usually think, or make time, to ask.

Go With What You Know

As you post and engage on a regular basis, you accumulate data. And these records provide a wealth of information. Why not take advantage of an otherwise inconvenient break in the action to go through it all?

Check in with your team: what challenges are being reported en masse in their online interactions? Conversely, are there any comments or reactions to content that stand out? Even if you can’t see the interactions themselves for any reason, spending the time to take stock on what you’re seeing and how your strategy moving forward should be impacted by those observations. That way, when the platforms are back in action, you can be too- with refreshed insight and new ideas.

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The post 3 Tips for Staying Social When Social Is Down appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/03/3-tips-for-staying-social-when-social-is-down/

Bumble’s “Women in Bizz” Feature Aims to Bust Up Boys’ Clubs

Bumble’s women-first approach has revolutionized women make romantic matches online, and that influence has expanded to create new friendships and new professional connections. Their latest feature, Women in Bizz, aims to further professional mentorship between women—and hopefully busting up exclusionary boys’ clubs in the process.

Available in the Bumble Bizz portion of the app, the feature can be activated in the apps setting by toggling the “I want to connect with…” option to “Women Only.” On their community blog The Beehive, their rationale was explained through the lens of a recent McKinsey report:

A recent study shows that one in five women says they’re often the lone woman present in any given work situation. The same report shows that while women are underrepresented at every level, women of color are the least likely to find their counterparts in boardrooms or c-suites.

“Representation is critically important for women, especially in traditionally male-dominated industries,” Bumble founder and CEO Whitney Wolfe Herd shared with CNBC. In their statement, the company identifies fields like finance, automotive, and energy as a few of these largely male spaces. They go on to encourage women on the site to accept these requests and help others ascend to new heights in their organizations: “we hope women embrace the opportunity to help foster each others’ development and ask for the time they may not be getting in the workplace.”

Bumble Bizz launched in 2017 as a way for the platform to extend the female-forward mentality of outreach to professional situations. The additional mention of women of color largely mirrors the overall experience of women of color on dating sites; Bumble has shown its support for these women through its hiring of advisors like Priyanka Chopra and Serena Williams.

Now, by citing their specific experiences as justification for this new feature, it is hoped that the platform’s users will take care of one another- resulting in more female prosperity across its users. “If you opt into Women in Bizz, be sure to pull up a seat for the next woman who walks through your office’s doors and pass along what you’ve learned. Success is sweeter when shared, isn’t it?”

“We’re helping women connect with other women to show them what’s possible and give them resources as they build their careers,” Wolfe shared. And if Bumble’s considerable success in changing the dating game is any indication, this feature has the potential to bring more women into impactful roles in organizations across the country.

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The post Bumble’s “Women in Bizz” Feature Aims to Bust Up Boys’ Clubs appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/03/bumbles-women-in-bizz-feature-aims-to-bust-up-boys-clubs/

The Power of Storytelling: How to Use Our Influence for Good

In the digital age, the power of storytelling is more prevalent than ever before. When you have the power to reach billions of people instantaneously, the stories you tell carry influence, and with this influence comes responsibility. Our role primarily begins with recognizing that the way we tell stories today will continue to change.

During #SMWNYC, sessions led by some of the world’s most creative and successful storytellers and leading brands will discuss this precise topic as part of our global theme Stories: With Great Influence Comes Great Responsibility.

Register for your pass at 10% off and save $250

Creating storylines that are consumer-led is no easy feat. In a fireside chat, Postmate’s Eric Edge, SVP, Brand and Communications, will speak to this subject assessing how successful brands are achieving a best-in-class storytelling technique and providing actionable takeaways around adapting your brand around consumer-driven stories. In a similar vein, Jason Hsiao, Chief Video Offer and Co-Founder of Animoto, will share his best tips and tricks for capturing eyes across Facebook, Instagram, and YouTube through key video marketing tactics brands and influencers swear by.

The first step in navigating the evolution of storytelling is embracing our responsibility. Award-winning storyteller, Ari Kuschnir, will explore this notion by outlining ways to fully realize storytelling’s true potential through the lens of his favorite bio/neuro hacking tools.
In a closing keynote address, best-selling author and entrepreneur Seth Godin will discuss ways to find the balance between causing a “ruckus” without “becoming a hard-working cog in a system that doesn’t care.”

Additional sessions to bookmark include:

There’s still time to join these speakers and many more in New York this spring (April 30-May 2, at the Sheraton New York Times Square) at 10% off the walkup price– so act fast, and look toward a future of effective positive storytelling with us!

Join 100,000+ fellow marketers who advance their skills and knowledge by subscribing to our weekly newsletter.

WATCH OUR 2019 PROMO

The post The Power of Storytelling: How to Use Our Influence for Good appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/03/the-power-of-storytelling-how-to-use-our-influence-for-good/

How to Use Split Tests on Facebook to Find Your Target Audience

With approximately 2.23 billion people logging on to Facebook every month, the social networking service has definitely secured its place in the ecommerce industry as the top platform for both B2B and B2C businesses.

But with over 80 million small- to medium- business pages vying for the coveted Facebook user’s attention, how do you optimize your ads for your marketing objective (whether it be for brand awareness, views, traffic, lead generation, engagement or conversion) and at the same time, make sure you get your money’s worth?

Thankfully, you won’t have to aimlessly conduct trial and error experiments. Facebook’s Split Testing tool enables you to test your campaign by setting a defined budget and duration and then choosing any of five vital ad elements (more on this later) to find out which is most effective.

So how does this Facebook feature actually work? Continue reading on, but before you get too excited, below are five no-nos when conducting a Facebook Split Test:

  1. Don’t go blind: You can’t conduct split tests based on gut-feel. Make use of the insights and analytics tools Facebook provides to help you tailor fit your test design.
  2. Don’t go too big: You can’t be overly-ambitious. While it may be tempting to assume that you can potentially reach Facebook’s billion-people population… Let’s be realistic, you can’t. It’s not like you have an unlimited budget to spend, and nor is your product or service for everyone too.
  3. Don’t be stingy and impatient: Reliable results can only be generated if you spend enough (if you have no clue, the tool provides an ideal figure) on the campaign and let an ad run for at least four days. As well, don’t be tempted to cancel an ad if it’s doing poorly.
  4. Don’t major in minors: While testing which design elements and ad copy your audience engages with the most is a good strategy, you shouldn’t waste precious ad spending on a test that will simply determine which font type or background color works best. Choose a vital element such as the ad headline copy, image, or video to differentiate. Then try to strike a balance between variation and similarity, as shown in the example below that tries to work out which is better—a text only ad or an add with an image.
  5. Don’t disregard optimizing for multiple devices: 95.1% of active Facebook users access the social media platform via their smartphone. In the same way that mobile app testing is conducted to make sure a developed application works seamlessly across different devices and operating systems, the same needs to be done with your adverts. You may create your ads on a desktop computer, but make sure the designs are responsive when viewed in multiple devices with varied display sizes.

Source: Jeff Bullas

The Ultimate Guide to Creating a Facebook Split Test to Determine Your Best Target Audience

Now that you know what not to do when creating a Facebook split test, below is a rundown on how you can make the most out of this innovative tool that will help you strategize for meaningful and engaging Facebook content.

1. Setting up your campaign and choosing your ad objective

Once you decide to conduct a test, the first step is to Create a campaign in your Facebook Ad Manager. This is button 2 in the photo below.

Source: AdEspresso

Then, you will be prompted to Choose your objective. Your Facebook ad can either be for awareness, consideration or conversion as shown in the possible options below.

Source: AdEspresso

2. Turning on the Split Test feature

After choosing your desired objective, you can now tick the Create Split Test box. Note that the feature has to be enabled in advance and cannot be simply activated for already ongoing campaigns, unless you edit your ad set (which will interrupt the current campaign).

Source: Social Media Examiner

3. Selecting the variable

There are five variables to choose from when testing out your campaign, each addressing a crucial question in Facebook content creation:

  • Creative: Which design elements work best?
  • Audience: Which specific audience engages with your ad the most?
  • Optimization event: Which ad delivery method will help you achieve your campaign goal?
  • Placement: Where should your ads be shown?
  • Product set: Which inventory items does your audience engage with the most?

Keep in mind that these variables can only be tested one at a time. For this guide, we will be focusing on choosing the appropriate target audience.

Source: Social Media Examiner

4. Making Your Ad Sets

With your campaign basics set-up, you can now create your ad set that will prompt you to choose each set’s corresponding audience (more on this later) and budget, schedule as elaborated in the next step. A maximum of five ad sets can be created and tested against each other.

Source: Business2Community

5. Determining the budget and schedule

If you are new to Facebook advertising, the social media platform makes it easy by setting a default minimum and ideal budget for each ad set you are testing for. The budget can either be split evenly or weighted.

As for scheduling, Facebook recommends a minimum of four days and a maximum of 14 (if you have budget to spare) to get valid results. Remember, scheduling isn’t just about the campaign duration, but also choosing the best time for the post to go live.

Source: Social Media Examiner

6. Zeroing in on your Target Audience

Split testing to determine the most suitable target audience can be done by specifying which group of users will see each ad set, and then customizing other demographic information such as location, age, gender, languages, interests and behavior.

Source: Social Media Examiner

If you have not created a custom audience yet, you can do so based on the different types of users who have already engaged with your page.

Source: Social Media Examiner

You can also choose to generate a lookalike audience based on the demographic of those that have interacted with your enterprise. Take time to understand how customizing and retargeting your audience works.

After you have differentiated the audiences for your ad sets, you should be able to view your Split test summary.

Source: Social Media Examiner

7. Designing Your Ad

After setting up the parameters for your audience split test, now comes the fun part of creating your ad. Facebook has five different layouts (carousel, single image, single video, or canvas) to choose from that features different ways of combining text, image and videos.

Source: Buffer

After making a selection, you can now upload your image and fill in the copy such as in the example below. Then, repeat the process depending on how many ad sets you will be creating.

Source: Buffer

Keep in mind that since you are split testing for the audience variable, other ad elements must be identical or have minimal differences only as exhibited in the example below that had identical copy but modified images.

Source: Business2Community

8. Narrowing Down the Audience Split Test Feature to Target by Key Traffic Type

Your Facebook page traffic can be narrowed down into three types—cold, warm and hot:

    • Cold traffic – users that have zero knowledge or interaction with your brand
    • Warm traffic – users that have heard of you brand and have interacted with your page but have not been converted in buying your product or service
    • Hot traffic – users that have recently purchased from your business and can be encouraged to buy again (upsell) or those that have been converted before and now need reminding (re-engagement)

Attracting cold traffic primarily involves creating ads for awareness by providing content in the form of blog posts, surveys, guides or reports that is relevant to your enterprise’s industry as displayed in the example below. Split testing at this first stage in the conversion funnel usually entails setting up lookalike audiences and experimenting with creative, optimization or placement elements.

Source: Business2Community

On the other hand, testing engagement of warm and hot traffic can be further narrowed down to see which segment will respond best to your goal. For example, if you want to know which ad will drive the most webpage visits, choose traffic as your campaign objective.

Source: Social Media Examiner

Then, set the Audience variable of your ad sets by choosing from any of the readily available Custom Audience category types Facebook provides (as shown in Step 5) or even compare with a specific warm audience that has interacted with a video you have posted.

Source: Social Media Examiner

Custom audiences can reflect users at whatever stage they are at in the sales funnel. By using this split testing feature, you can optimize your ads for each audience segment to ultimately lead the audience from awareness to conversion.

9. Assessing your results and what to do next

Once your campaign duration is over, you will receive a notification and an email of the results. The best performing ad set is determined by the advert that yielded the highest result at the lowest cost possible. Other aspects included in the outcome summary are:

  • The number of times your ad accomplished the intended goal of the campaign
  • The average cost per achieved result
  • The total amount of money spent for the split testing exercise

The results can either equip you with better insights for your next campaign, or you can choose to adopt or renew the winning advert. Facebook provides a confidence level percentage so you can be assured that you will most likely get the similar desired outcome. The general rule of thumb of a clear an actionable result is a confidence level of at least 75%.

Conclusion

Facebook’s Split Testing feature allows you systematically test a variety of integral ad components through an isolated approach to see what blend works best for your target audience. Keep in mind that you shouldn’t be disheartened if an ad you run does poorly. Making these kinds of “mistakes” are not a waste of money. Learning what doesn’t work is a worthwhile investment as well.

Now, it’s time to put new learning into practice. Head over to your Facebook Ads Manager, up your game by using other ad tools and management platforms, and create those split tests!

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The post How to Use Split Tests on Facebook to Find Your Target Audience appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/03/how-to-use-split-tests-on-facebook-to-find-your-target-audience/

How Innovation Helps Reduce Friction Along the Consumer Journey

Cadillac CMO Deborah Wahl is proud of Cadillac’s culture. She explained to EVP of Viacom Ad Solutions, Val Bischak, during a fireside chat at CES that a culture of innovation has allowed them to keep the legacy brand relevant to new consumers through a focus on technology and diversity of thought.

“Be nice, generous and kind..even as you’re trying to blow s**t up,” Wahl said, citing one of her industry mentors. The tongue-in-cheek remark matches CEO Mary Barra’s push to position GM as a technology company. “That’s why we’re here at CES,” Wahl said. “Honing in on all the technology and capabilities for the things we all talk about: personalization, customer knowledge—and make it work for us so that we are getting the right messages at the right time.”

She told Bischak that, unlike other big brands, which tend to attempt big, bold, and transformational marketing moves, Cadillac decided to focus on reducing friction along the consumer journey experience. “It’s the day to day things about what performs and where you go that are the most important,” Wahl said. “Because that’s a journey as well, and it’s one that you focus on every day.”  

The goal to position the vehicle as “infrastructure technology,” and focus on the consumer’s interactions with said technology. “We’re trying to reduce the friction,” Wahl said, adding that making the experience more seamless has provided insights regarding what consumers value, and what’s the next solution to bring forward.

The Cadillac CMO admits the strategy is not easy. “It takes a lot of perseverance to get it done,” Wahl said about perfecting “the basics,” those pieces in the customer journey that, at the end of the day, have a significant impact in the overall experience.

“There’s a lot of talk about how much more complex the role of CMO has become,” said Bischak. “Chief Experience Officer, do you relate to that?” Wahl responded “yes,” as long as they create and promote a culture of innovation and use technology to better the overall experience. “That’s always been the secret role of the CMO; how to navigate things so your talented and amazing team can get all their great ideas through.”

The fireside interview between Valerie Bischak, SVP of Ad Solutions of Viacom, and Deborah Wahl, CMO of Cadillac, was conducted as part of the annual “Brands Bet on Digital” Conference which was held in Las Vegas in conjunction with the Consumer Electronic Showcase (CES).

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The post How Innovation Helps Reduce Friction Along the Consumer Journey appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/03/how-innovation-helps-reduce-friction-along-the-consumer-journey/

5 Ways Gen Z Has Changed Social Media (and How Brands Have Taken Notice)

With over 61 million people in the United States alone, Generation Z is poised to bring about some significant changes. Indeed, CNBC’s Chris Morris covered how those born after 1996 are already changing the workplace and other aspects of day-to-day life.

Because members of Gen Z have grown up in the digital age, they are more comfortable with it than older generations — and as a result, they are also more inclined to influence and reshape it.

Anyone hoping to succeed in social media should be especially mindful of how Gen Z has already had an impact. Here’s a closer look at some of the ways Gen Z is changing the social media landscape, as well as how some brands have taken notice:

1. Channel Hopping

Unlike other groups, Gen Z isn’t always going to stay on the same social media platform for hours on end. As AdWeek’s Brittany Hodak explains, “Gen Z tends to find new products on Instagram, with 45 percent using it for brand discovery. They then turn to YouTube for product research at twice the rate that their millennial brothers and sisters do. Once Gen Z decides to make a purchase, many head into brick-and-mortar stores, where they’re more likely than any other generation to share their shopping experiences on Snapchat.”

This doesn’t just require that brands have a strong presence across several different social media channels — it also means that companies need to find ways to deliver smaller, bite-size pieces of content, such as by using shorter video pre-roll ads.

“If there is one thing Gen Z values most, it’s time,” writes Gen Z influencer and marketing expert Connor Blakley. “The best brands leverage new technology to provide customers with an added layer of functionality and convenience.”

2. The Rise of Digital ‘Third Places’

Third places” have long been viewed as important elements of building community—the places where we spend our time when we aren’t at home or at work. While third places have traditionally been physical locations like malls or coffee shops, Gen Z is leading a trend that sees digital software becoming its own third place.

One need only look at the wild success of Fortnite to see that digital spaces can become a legitimate third place. Other brands are also seeking to establish themselves in this same way.

For example, the app Squad lets users screen share from their smartphones — perfect for browsing apps together, watching videos or even collaborating on school projects when users aren’t in the same physical location. The app has already seen notable success among teen girls, thanks to its ability to create a digital hangout space.

3. The Power of Internet Influencers

Though athletes and pop stars still gain lots of headlines, Gen Z is far more likely to be influenced by social media celebrities. This could include anyone from fashion bloggers to Instagram travel photographers.

These mini-celebrities often have followers numbering in the thousands, rather than millions. But because they form closer connections with their niche audience, they are often viewed as more trustworthy and engaging when involved in marketing partnerships.

For example, Fiji Water partnered with fashion blogger Danielle Bernstein to create a series of workout videos, linking the influencer’s fitness and style credentials with the brand. Such partnerships will prove even more essential in communicating brand values to Gen Z — 57 percent have made purchases based on online influencer promotions.

4. Seeking Content First

Though connecting with friends through social media is still important for Gen Z, surveys have found that they are far more likely than other groups to use social media “to fill up spare time” or “to find funny or entertaining content.”

The phrase “content is king” may feel like it has been overused in recent years, but Gen Z’s social media habits prove that providing great content is crucial to connecting with this audience. Gen Z isn’t going to appreciate intrusive ads that disrupt their entertainment experience. However, brands that provide quality entertainment in their own right can quickly build a huge following of their own.

Red Bull’s YouTube channel doesn’t simply pump out ads for its drinks …

Instead, it focuses on lifestyle videos built around the extreme sports community. With over 8 million subscribers, it is clear that a content-first, rather than marketing-first approach will yield superior engagement.

5. Visual Content Dominates

Gen Z seeks visual content more than anything else when online, and their preferred social media networks are a clear reflection of this. A 2018 Pew Research Center study found that YouTube, Instagram and Snapchat are by far the most popular platforms for teens. In comparison, only about half of teens use Facebook, while less than one-third use Twitter.

The key commonality between the most popular social media platforms is their visual-first function. Videos and photos are more engaging and easier to consume, especially when viewed on a smartphone.

As Gen Z entrepreneur Deep Patel writes, “This opens the door for brands to share more human stories of their own, which will inspire audiences to try out their product. Storytelling feels real, immediate and personal, but it also demands a mix of more time-intensive video, images and graphics, and requires brands to be more creative and thoughtful in the intent.”

Incorporating your brand’s core messaging into visual content will make it much more likely to stand out and appeal to the younger generation.

By 2020, it is expected that Gen Z “will account for 40 percent of all consumers and influence nearly $4 billion in discretionary spending.” Savvy brands understand the importance of adapting to the changes Gen Z is bringing now so they will be better poised for success in the years ahead.

As you learn to leverage social media in a way that appeals to Gen Z, your brand will be far better positioned in our increasingly digital world.

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The post 5 Ways Gen Z Has Changed Social Media (and How Brands Have Taken Notice) appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/03/5-ways-gen-z-has-changed-social-media-and-how-brands-have-taken-notice/

PODCAST: The Path Towards Greater Intelligence with Tania Yuki, Founder and CEO at Shareablee

This week’s episode of Social Media Week’s Leads2Scale podcast features Tania Yuki, Founder and Chief Executive Officer at Shareablee, a social intelligence platform.

During the conversation, Tania discussed:

  • What inspired her to leave her cushy gig at a big media company to start Shareablee
  • How Shareablee differentiates itself from the competition
  • How she is thinking about the role of AI in regards to automation
  • What emerging trends she is seeing in the data and analytics space
  • And much more.

Listen to the full episode below:

Subscribe to Leads2Scale on Anchor, Apple Podcasts, Breaker, Google Podcasts, Pocket Casts, RadioPublic, Spotify, Castbox, Overcast, or Stitcher.

If you have suggestions for who we should interview or what topics you would like us to cover, please reach out to us at leads2scale@socialmediaweek.org.

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The post PODCAST: The Path Towards Greater Intelligence with Tania Yuki, Founder and CEO at Shareablee appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/03/podcast-the-path-towards-greater-intelligence-with-tania-yuki-founder-and-ceo-at-shareablee/

The Puzzle of Social Content Moderation and How to Manage It

Social media moderators and community managers serve as the custodians of a brand’s reputation…but as any comments section will demonstrate, they may face varying levels of backlash from users in the process. And while Casey Newton’s in-depth report on the horrors of Facebook’s content moderation firms might seem a world away from the work they do each day, it’s not as far as we might think. It’s time to start thinking about how to help these folks avoid their own horrors.

Why worry about this if the platforms themselves have their own moderators? Although moderators for Facebook and other platforms are drastically reducing the number of objectionable posts users see, there are a number of categories of posts that might meet the Terms of Service for a site but may otherwise be distressing or unpleasant to see repeatedly.

What’s more, even exposure to low-grade negativity (look below any brand’s Instagram post and you’ll see at least five unsolicited complaints about service) can rewire the brain– including the hippocampus, the section of the brain responsible for problem solving and intelligent, rational thought. Suffice it to say: you want that capacity intact in the people who represent your brand online!

So what can be done to reduce the impact of this sort of work? Many elements of it are unavoidable—given that 72% of consumers expect a response to a complaint posted on Twitter within the hour, those types of posts won’t go away anytime soon—but their lasting negative impact doesn’t have to be.

Acknowledge the challenging nature of the work

Unintentionally or not, the plight of community managers and social media managers are often minimized in conversation. Time and again, missteps by these folks are attributed to interns or other unskilled workers- implying that their work can be done easily or without much thought. Maintaining this falsehood is what’s contributing to the rise of AI as a “solution” to these challenges. But Data and Society researcher Robyn Caplan identified a major challenge in handing over this work to machines: “the problem with trying to get machines to understand this sort of content, is that it is essentially asking them to understand human culture- a phenomenon too fluid and subtle to be described in simple, machine readable rules.”

Social media managers and community managers are doing intricate and skilled work, reliant upon their judgment and a keen understanding of the brand’s identity and voice. The sooner we acknowledge and affirm that fact, the better they’ll feel as they embark upon the occasional abyss that the internet has become.

Offer breaks

Among the most egregious horrors of the Facebook farms was the “time on task” expected of moderators, even in the wake of seeing traumatic content. “Wellness breaks” were reportedly nine minutes in length, and other breaks were limited to 30 minutes. When these breaks were taken, time away from desks was logged electronically.

But in the world your moderators and social staff live in, more breathing room can be provided- both to facilitate ideation for good content, and to create psychological distance from any challenging or unpleasant information. This should apply to breaks taken over the course of a day, as well as the perceived freedom to take vacation for longer restorative breaks. The time away will ensure their patience, sharpness, and creativity- all qualities we should value in these roles.

Publicize coping options

Even when precautions are taken, negative effects may still take hold. Particularly at peak times around a launch or a publicity crisis, protection from the “tough stuff” may be unavoidable. It’s in these moments that people should know the options they have to cope with the nature of their work. What options are covered by employee health insurance? What programs or offerings can be brought to the office? And how can these options be publicized year-round, rather than at times when stress is most evident or common?

If difficult conditions are a necessary part of the work, it stands to reason that helping to keep these employees restored and at peak capacity should be a key part of the workplace as well. If help is needed, it should be simple to find and non-stigmatizing to take advantage of. By doing so, you create an environment where people can easily and effectively do their best work.

Of the fraught relationship between content moderators and the content that crosses their screens day in and day out, The Verge’s James Vincent said, “the humans tasked with cleaning up the internet’s mess are miserable, and the humans creating that mess aren’t much better off.” And while your social media managers and community managers may not have yet descended to the level of “miserable,” that plight can be avoided. These measures, and others designed to acknowledge their challenging but necessary work, can help.

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The post The Puzzle of Social Content Moderation and How to Manage It appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/03/the-puzzle-of-social-content-moderation-and-how-to-manage-it/

Why We Need to Dance With Robots

Global agency Huge and their Chief Creative Officer, Jason Musante is making a case for future tech, data, and AI as assets to our work in “Dancing with Robots: Why the Next 20 Years of Marketing Will Be The Most Impactful.” Musante’s company has played a major role in the evolution of a number of different companies’ strategy, and he’ll be revealing how agencies and brands can “future-proof” their work by learning to lean toward, and not away from, these advances that ultimately will make the work easier, stronger, and more effective.

Jason’s ability to tell impactful stories rooted in technology, data, and organizational strategy comes from his time at Havas New York where, as Managing Director/Group ECD, he led the agency to their best year at Cannes and the Clios in 2016. There, he also partnered with The United States Digital Service – President Obama’s digital startup dedicated to helping the government work more efficiently.

A future-proof work strategy is imperative for any organization that wants to ensure its relevance. After all, as marketers, we’re custodians of the story of our brands. By looking ahead to the next twenty years of the field – and the forces that will surely impact it – you’ll guarantee your ability to meaningfully continue that story for decades to come.

Jason’s talk is part of our Future of Brands track, dedicated to highlighting where social strategy is going—and what can be done now to prepare accordingly. Being competent is no longer sufficient; marketers and social strategists must also strive to be cutting-edge in their approach…and the sessions on this track will help.

There’s still time to join these speakers and many more in New York this spring (April 30-May 2, at the Sheraton New York Times Square) at 10% off the walkup price– so act fast, and look toward a future that continues to honor and harness the power of stories with us!

The post Why We Need to Dance With Robots appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/03/why-we-need-to-dance-with-robots/

YouTube Promises “Blunt Actions” to Secure Child Safety and Soothe Advertisers

A 2018 Cheq and IPG Media survey revealed that most consumers believe that ad placement is intentional; further, they are 2.8 times less willing to associate with a brand when its ads are displayed in environments that are unsafe or unsavory. Given that tidbit, it’s no surprise to see the exodus of advertisers from YouTube in the wake of parallel scandals over sexually inappropriate and anti-vaccination content.

This week, the platform hastened a number of measures in the works to combat this content, and addressed its advertisers in the most comprehensive way yet.

A copy of the letter obtained by AdWeek revealed a combination of contrition and concentration, as the company works to crack down on offenders and demonetize content that presents danger to their users. “Because of the importance of getting child safety right,” they wrote, “we announced a series of blunt actions to sharpen our ability to act more precisely.

Among the measures swiftly undertaken this week:

  • The disabling of comments on “tens of millions of videos” that could attract predatory behavior
  • “Reducing the discoverability” of content that has been flagged (a strategy that Pinterest has used with some success)
  • Terminating offending accounts
  • “Increasing accountability” within the community of creators on the site, a community that uploads a staggering 400 hours of video to the site each second
  • “A more unforgiving stance” for creators who post inappropriate children’s content
  • The hastening of development on a machine learning powered “comments classifier,” which will ultimately be able to flag and remove twice as many comments as the existing system, a combination of algorithms and manual reviewers.

These measures have been deployed in hopes of stopping YouTube’s proverbial bleeding of advertisers, which in recent days has included AT&T, Disney, Nestle, McDonalds, Epic Games, and several others. AT&T reportedly told the New York Times, “until Google (YouTube’s parent company) can protect our brand from offensive content of any kind, we are removing all advertising from YouTube.” A similar exodus of advertisers took place back in 2017, when AT&T ads, along with those of Johnson & Johnson and Verizon were placed alongside racist content and videos posted by terrorist groups. This time, the company’s countermeasures have been swift and public.

The problem is a complicated one, as one executive (speaking anonymously) shared with FastCompany.

“There is no such thing as 100% safety when it comes to user-generated content, and marketers need to know that although there can be a zero-tolerance effort, there’s no such thing as 100% brand safety or 0% risk.”

The measures above, along with demonetizing videos in certain categories, can move a platform toward being a safer place. The 10,000 content reviewers that YouTube brought on in the wake of their 2017 scandal can also make a dent in the problem. But it still may not be enough.

In a statement, YouTube acknowledged, “there’s more to be done, and we continue to work to improve and catch abuse more quickly.” With any luck, this aggressive and comprehensive attention to addressing these concerns – for the sake of advertisers, and the viewing public using the platform – will continue long after the media firestorm dies down.

Join 100,000+ fellow marketers who advance their skills and knowledge by subscribing to our weekly newsletter.

WATCH OUR 2019 PROMO

The post YouTube Promises “Blunt Actions” to Secure Child Safety and Soothe Advertisers appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/03/youtube-promises-blunt-actions-to-secure-child-safety-and-soothe-advertisers/

YouTube Promises “Blunt Actions” to Secure Child Safety and Soothe Advertisers

A 2018 Cheq and IPG Media survey revealed that most consumers believe that ad placement is intentional; further, they are 2.8 times less willing to associate with a brand when its ads are displayed in environments that are unsafe or unsavory. Given that tidbit, it’s no surprise to see the exodus of advertisers from YouTube in the wake of parallel scandals over sexually inappropriate and anti-vaccination content.

This week, the platform hastened a number of measures in the works to combat this content, and addressed its advertisers in the most comprehensive way yet.

A copy of the letter obtained by AdWeek revealed a combination of contrition and concentration, as the company works to crack down on offenders and demonetize content that presents danger to their users. “Because of the importance of getting child safety right,” they wrote, “we announced a series of blunt actions to sharpen our ability to act more precisely.

Among the measures swiftly undertaken this week:

  • The disabling of comments on “tens of millions of videos” that could attract predatory behavior
  • “Reducing the discoverability” of content that has been flagged (a strategy that Pinterest has used with some success)
  • Terminating offending accounts
  • “Increasing accountability” within the community of creators on the site, a community that uploads a staggering 400 hours of video to the site each second
  • “A more unforgiving stance” for creators who post inappropriate children’s content
  • The hastening of development on a machine learning powered “comments classifier,” which will ultimately be able to flag and remove twice as many comments as the existing system, a combination of algorithms and manual reviewers.

These measures have been deployed in hopes of stopping YouTube’s proverbial bleeding of advertisers, which in recent days has included AT&T, Disney, Nestle, McDonalds, Epic Games, and several others. AT&T reportedly told the New York Times, “until Google (YouTube’s parent company) can protect our brand from offensive content of any kind, we are removing all advertising from YouTube.” A similar exodus of advertisers took place back in 2017, when AT&T ads, along with those of Johnson & Johnson and Verizon were placed alongside racist content and videos posted by terrorist groups. This time, the company’s countermeasures have been swift and public.

The problem is a complicated one, as one executive (speaking anonymously) shared with FastCompany.

“There is no such thing as 100% safety when it comes to user-generated content, and marketers need to know that although there can be a zero-tolerance effort, there’s no such thing as 100% brand safety or 0% risk.”

The measures above, along with demonetizing videos in certain categories, can move a platform toward being a safer place. The 10,000 content reviewers that YouTube brought on in the wake of their 2017 scandal can also make a dent in the problem. But it still may not be enough.

In a statement, YouTube acknowledged, “there’s more to be done, and we continue to work to improve and catch abuse more quickly.” With any luck, this aggressive and comprehensive attention to addressing these concerns – for the sake of advertisers, and the viewing public using the platform – will continue long after the media firestorm dies down.

Join 100,000+ fellow marketers who advance their skills and knowledge by subscribing to our weekly newsletter.

WATCH OUR 2019 PROMO

The post YouTube Promises “Blunt Actions” to Secure Child Safety and Soothe Advertisers appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/03/youtube-promises-blunt-actions-to-secure-child-safety-and-soothe-advertisers/

YouTube Promises “Blunt Actions” to Secure Child Safety and Soothe Advertisers

A 2018 Cheq and IPG Media survey revealed that most consumers believe that ad placement is intentional; further, they are 2.8 times less willing to associate with a brand when its ads are displayed in environments that are unsafe or unsavory. Given that tidbit, it’s no surprise to see the exodus of advertisers from YouTube in the wake of parallel scandals over sexually inappropriate and anti-vaccination content.

This week, the platform hastened a number of measures in the works to combat this content, and addressed its advertisers in the most comprehensive way yet.

A copy of the letter obtained by AdWeek revealed a combination of contrition and concentration, as the company works to crack down on offenders and demonetize content that presents danger to their users. “Because of the importance of getting child safety right,” they wrote, “we announced a series of blunt actions to sharpen our ability to act more precisely.

Among the measures swiftly undertaken this week:

  • The disabling of comments on “tens of millions of videos” that could attract predatory behavior
  • “Reducing the discoverability” of content that has been flagged (a strategy that Pinterest has used with some success)
  • Terminating offending accounts
  • “Increasing accountability” within the community of creators on the site, a community that uploads a staggering 400 hours of video to the site each second
  • “A more unforgiving stance” for creators who post inappropriate children’s content
  • The hastening of development on a machine learning powered “comments classifier,” which will ultimately be able to flag and remove twice as many comments as the existing system, a combination of algorithms and manual reviewers.

These measures have been deployed in hopes of stopping YouTube’s proverbial bleeding of advertisers, which in recent days has included AT&T, Disney, Nestle, McDonalds, Epic Games, and several others. AT&T reportedly told the New York Times, “until Google (YouTube’s parent company) can protect our brand from offensive content of any kind, we are removing all advertising from YouTube.” A similar exodus of advertisers took place back in 2017, when AT&T ads, along with those of Johnson & Johnson and Verizon were placed alongside racist content and videos posted by terrorist groups. This time, the company’s countermeasures have been swift and public.

The problem is a complicated one, as one executive (speaking anonymously) shared with FastCompany.

“There is no such thing as 100% safety when it comes to user-generated content, and marketers need to know that although there can be a zero-tolerance effort, there’s no such thing as 100% brand safety or 0% risk.”

The measures above, along with demonetizing videos in certain categories, can move a platform toward being a safer place. The 10,000 content reviewers that YouTube brought on in the wake of their 2017 scandal can also make a dent in the problem. But it still may not be enough.

In a statement, YouTube acknowledged, “there’s more to be done, and we continue to work to improve and catch abuse more quickly.” With any luck, this aggressive and comprehensive attention to addressing these concerns – for the sake of advertisers, and the viewing public using the platform – will continue long after the media firestorm dies down.

Join 100,000+ fellow marketers who advance their skills and knowledge by subscribing to our weekly newsletter.

WATCH OUR 2019 PROMO

The post YouTube Promises “Blunt Actions” to Secure Child Safety and Soothe Advertisers appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/03/youtube-promises-blunt-actions-to-secure-child-safety-and-soothe-advertisers/

Mobile Has Collapsed the Marketing Funnel: Here’s How To Capitalize On This Trend

For decades (or centuries, depending on who you ask) marketers have relied upon “the funnel” as a mechanism to gauge interest, direct content, and ultimately achieve the goals of our organizations. But mobile, together with social media has subverted the expectations set by this methodology.

During #SMWNYC this April, former head of social at GAP and now founder and CEO of MikMak, Rachel Tipograph will take you through the playbook of how brands hack their growth in a world where the mobile feed has inverted the shopper’s journey.

Rachel is one of the most dynamic professionals in her field and has been recognized as a leading innovator across the globe, including Forbes’ “30 under 30 Who Are Changing The World”, Marie Claire’s “50 Most Influential Women in America,” and Fast Company’s “Most Creative People in Business.”

Rachel’s talk is part of our Future of Brands track, dedicated to highlighting where social strategy is going—and what can be done now to prepare accordingly. Being competent is no longer sufficient; marketers and social strategists must also strive to be cutting-edge in their approach…and the sessions on this track will help.

There’s still time to join these speakers and many more in New York this spring (April 30-May 2, at the Sheraton New York Times Square) at 10% off the walkup price– so act fast, and look toward a future beyond the funnel with us!

Join 100,000+ fellow marketers who advance their skills and knowledge by subscribing to our weekly newsletter.

WATCH OUR 2019 PROMO

The post Mobile Has Collapsed the Marketing Funnel: Here’s How To Capitalize On This Trend appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/03/mobile-has-collapsed-the-marketing-funnel-heres-how-to-capitalize-on-this-trend/