How To Cultivate Your Brand-Influencer Relationships

Back in June, Lia Haberman, Senior Director of Social Media and Audience Growth at LIVESTRONG.COM, took the stage at SMWLA to explain how her company develops on-going relationships and creates lasting partnerships with influencers.

In this clip, Lia urges brands to consider their influencer’s goals in order to invest in a healthy partnership with them.

Read the full recap and sign up for SMW Insider to watch the full session.

Learn the latest trends, insights and best practices from the brightest minds in media and technology. Sign up for SMW Insider to watch full-length sessions from official Social Media Week conferences live and on-demand.

The post How To Cultivate Your Brand-Influencer Relationships appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2018/09/how-to-cultivate-your-brand-influencer-relationships/

Interview: NatGeo’s VP of Digital, Adam Quinn on Which Platforms to Invest In

During Social Media Week Los Angeles, National Geographic’s Vice President of Digital, Adam Quinn, discussed how the company leverages the tools of digital media to continue to take its 130-year-old brand into the future as the most followed brand on social during their session, “Thumb-Stopping Social Storytelling.”

We sat down with Adam for more insights into what makes NatGeo the #1 brand on social and which platforms brands should be taking advantage of.

Check out the full interview above and a list of what was discussed below.

  • The biggest challenge facing our industry.
  • Which platforms to invest in.
  • What advice does he have for how to create content on a budget.

Learn the latest trends, insights and best practices from the brightest minds in media and technology. Sign up for SMW Insider to watch full-length sessions from official Social Media Week conferences live and on-demand.

The post Interview: NatGeo’s VP of Digital, Adam Quinn on Which Platforms to Invest In appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2018/09/interview-natgeos-vp-of-digital-adam-quinn-on-which-platforms-to-invest-in/

Facebook and LinkedIn Join the SMWLDN Lineup

Social Media Week London 2018 is fast approaching, and we’re continuing to bolster the lineup with incredible speakers and panelists to discuss new ideas, trends, and innovations in social media, publishing, and marketing.

SAVE UP TO £100 BEFORE PRICES INCREASE!

This week alone we’re announcing two new events, hosted by two of the biggest platforms in the industry: Facebook and LinkedIn.

  • On Thursday, November 15 at 12 p.m., Dan Robinson, Group Director at Facebook will host a talk called “Easy Come, Easy Go: The Disruption of Loyalty.” Robinson, who has been with Facebook for the last 6+ years, is uniquely suited to discuss how the future of loyalty between consumers, brands, and platforms is contingent upon meaningful interactions between all parties.
  • On Friday, November 16 at 12 p.m., Jason Miller, the Global Content Marketing Leader at LinkedIn will delve into marketing across the entire funnel with “How LinkedIn Uses LinkedIn For Marketing.” Miller has years of firsthand knowledge on how to reach and engage customers with native advertising, paid and organic content, and creative, practical use of video—and he promises to share best practices with attendees.

These are just two of the featured speakers we’ll have at #SMWLDN this year, representing BBC Radio, Dataminr, Reddit, and many more. Check out the full list of speakers.

In its ninth year, Social Media Week London will run from November 14-16, 2018 at the QEII Centre. Have you gotten your passes yet?

Get your tickets now and save over £100 on the Premium or Standard Passes over the walkup price!

Learn the latest trends, insights and best practices from the brightest minds in media and technology. Sign up for SMW Insider to watch full-length sessions from official Social Media Week conferences live and on-demand.

The post Facebook and LinkedIn Join the SMWLDN Lineup appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2018/09/facebook-and-linkedin-join-the-smwldn-lineup/

5 Reasons Why You Shouldn’t Buy Fake Followers

Big follower numbers on social media look impressive. To achieve that goal, many people turn to fake followers, which are imprecisely referred to as bots.

If you’re growing frustrated with a client who only cares about followers and likes, you may be tempted to pay for fake followers. After all, even if you actively fight against bots and report them, there’s no way to remove every fake account that follows you. Why not take advantage of this inherent flaw for your advantage?

Actively courting fake followers may give you a hollow short-term gain, but it’s one that means nothing to those who know not to rely on an easily manipulated metric.

Theoretically, having tons of followers means that people are interested in your brand and having a massive following will make your following grow event bigger by giving your page more exposure.

In reality, that may have been the case at one point, but it hasn’t been the case for a long time. It’s been said a million times, but it’s worth repeating: organic reach is almost non-existent, especially for those who don’t already follow your brand. Additionally, the fact that followers can be bought isn’t a secret.

Consumers are getting savvier. While it may make sense for Wendy’s to have over 2.7 million Twitter followers and over 8.5 million likes on Facebook, it would be suspicious for a small mom-and-pop restaurant to get anywhere near those numbers under almost all circumstances.

Here are five reasons why you shouldn’t invest in fake followers.

1. Your followers are a reflection on your content quality.

Many social media users will go through your followers to see who you attract and make sure your account is legitimate. If you aren’t one to follow many accounts, this may be the starting point for your followers find other businesses and people who provide similar or complementary content to what you provide.

Those who are interested in your brand and go through your followers will become suspicious if you have too many accounts that look sketchy or are obviously bots set up for the sole purpose of sharing other people’s content.

While you may gamble on the fact that not many people care about your followers, word gets around on the internet and you will be watched.

2. Buying fake followers will get you banned.

Is temporary success worth the risk of permanent expulsion from your chosen social media platforms?

Purchasing fake followers is the digital media equivalent of an athlete taking steroids. You may get caught in hindsight, but when your shady practices catch up with you there will be significant blowback.

As of May 2018, Facebook had closed 583 million fake profiles. In July 2018, The Washington Post reported Twitter had suspended 70 million suspected fakes. It’s only a matter of time before the social media platforms more aggressively pursue those who have an unusually large number of fake followers.

Citing the fact that this practice is widespread or that “everyone else is doing it” will only make things worse. It didn’t work with your mother, it doesn’t work when someone breaks the law, and it won’t win you any fans.

3. Followers/Likes matter less than they used to.

We all love the validation that seeing a new follower gives, but the harsh reality is that a simple follow means nothing. Engagement is what we need to focus on. It’s more important to have 100 engaged followers than 500,000 that you purchased from a click farm.

4. It dilutes the accuracy of your analytics.

If you bought a million followers, but only 1,000 are legitimate and respond to your posts, you have an engagement rate of 0.1 percent. That’s significantly less impressive and shows the pointlessness in bragging about following size.

In contrast, a company that has 1,000 followers and has 200 engaged users has an engagement rate of 20 percent. While these numbers would be extremely low for an international or national brand, they are actually pretty good numbers for a local business.

5. It’s a waste of money.

You’re better of spending potential bot money elsewhere. Sure, there are websites that lure you with promises of thousands of followers for a small fee. However, are you willing to use a perfectly good 20 dollars for an imaginary temporary victory?

There’s no good reason to buy fake followers. You may get a dopamine rush from your increasing follower count, but fake followers are nothing more than buying an award to show off because you didn’t want to take the time or effort to earn it yourself. It may take a while for people to catch on, but once they find out you will lose all credibility and end up digging yourself out of a hole of your own making.

 

Learn the latest trends, insights and best practices from the brightest minds in media and technology. Sign up for SMW Insider to watch full-length sessions from official Social Media Week conferences live and on-demand.

The post 5 Reasons Why You Shouldn’t Buy Fake Followers appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2018/09/5-reasons-why-you-shouldnt-buy-fake-followers/

Social Media News Archives – Digital Marketing Agency Cardiff, South Wales & Website Marketing inc. Sales and Marketing, SEO & Social Media Consultancy, Training & Services

Social Media News Archives – Digital Marketing Agency Cardiff, South Wales & Website Marketing inc. Sales and Marketing, SEO & Social Media Consultancy, Training & Services
— Read on maconsultancycardiff.com/category/social-media-news/

https://mikearmstrongnews.wordpress.com/2018/09/16/social-media-news-archives-digital-marketing-agency-cardiff-south-wales-website-marketing-inc-sales-and-marketing-seo-social-media-consultancy-training-services/

NEW PODCAST: Account-Based Marketing at Scale with Aaron Goldman, Chief Marketing Officer of 4C

This week’s episode of Social Media Week’s Leads2Scale podcast features Aaron Goldman, Chief Marketing Officer of 4C.

4C is a data science and media technology company that improves marketing effectiveness and efficiency for brands, agencies, media companies like eBay, NBC and Sony Pictures.

Aaron is another one of our seasoned Social Media Week speakers and will be taking the stage again at our London conference this coming November.

Back in April, at our New York conference, Aaron gave a talk and shared with our attendees how data can sometimes reveal surprising and counterintuitive insights and walked the audience through a number of ways to leverage these insights to better engage with their target audiences.

If you’re interested in learning more, Aaron’s talk is available to stream via smwinsider.com.

Featured in this episode, Aaron discussed:

  • How 4C is connecting TV data to the digital ad buying experience
  • The potential symbiotic relationship between brands, social, and analytics companies
  • How they approach B2B marketing, including their approach to account-based marketing.

Listen and subscribe via the following platforms: Anchor, Apple Podcasts, Breaker, Google Podcasts, Pocket Casts, RadioPublic, Spotify, Castbox, Overcast, and Stitcher.

If you have suggestions for who we should interview or what topics you would like us to cover, please reach out to us at leads2scale@socialmediaweek.org.

Learn the latest trends, insights and best practices from the brightest minds in media and technology. Sign up for SMW Insider to watch full-length sessions from official Social Media Week conferences live and on-demand.

The post NEW PODCAST: Account-Based Marketing at Scale with Aaron Goldman, Chief Marketing Officer of 4C appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2018/09/new-podcast-account-based-marketing-at-scale-with-aaron-goldman-chief-marketing-officer-of-4c/

Apple Announces iPhone XS, XS Max, XR, Apple Watch 4 at 2018 Event

Today was Apple’s annual keynote event, where they unveil new devices and discuss updates to their existing hardware, like the iPhone XS/iPhone XS Max, the cheaper but still stunning iPhone XR, and the Apple Watch 4.

In Cupertino, California on the Apple Park campus, CEO Tim Cook and other Apple executives took the stage around 10 a.m. PST.

Let’s run through all the news that Apple shared with viewers at the Steve Jobs Theater and around the world, which is already blowing up social media.

Apple Watch 4

Apple started by showcasing the new Apple Watch 4, introducing the Apple Watch as the number one watch (not just smartwatch) in the world.

AW4 is a big redesign for the watch, with a screen that now goes nearly edge to edge, creating a display that is 30 percent bigger than previous iterations while slimmer overall.

  • A new dual-core 64-bit processor that performs “two times better” than previous models.
  • A new build-in EKG scanner
  • An updated accelerometer and gyroscope, which can help detect falls and trigger an emergency call if you’re down for more than a minute.
  • You can take an electrocardiogram with your AW4, the first over-the-counter EKG product offered directly to consumers, complete with FDA approval.

There are lots of new faces and bands and finishes that you can select to go with your watch as well, so it’s a highly aesthetic update to go along with its internal improvements.

You can preorder the watch this Friday, and it will ship on Sept. 21, 2018. The GPS version will run $399, the LTE version $499.

Apple immediately dropped a new spot for the AW4, titled “Hokey Pokey.” Check it out.

The new iPhones: iPhone XS and iPhone XS Max

The XS and XS Max are similar in many ways to the iPhone X, which makes sense, since the -S series of iPhones are usually mainly spec and aesthetic upgrades.

The XS has a display with a dynamic range, improved Face ID capabilities, better water resistance (whew!) and a reportedly monstrous A12 Bionic processor.

That processor has a six-core CPU, four-core GPU, and an updated Neural Engine for handling AI tasks, handling a crazy 5 trillion operations per second.

The XS Max is going to steal headlines, however, because it’s a huge phone, one of the biggest on the market. With a 6.5-inch screen, it’s bigger than the 8 Plus as well as the Galaxy Note 9 by .1 inches.

Both phones will have improved battery life, with the XS going 30 minutes longer than the X, and the XS Max going a whopping 90 minutes longer.

iPhone XR

This the phone that will essentially replace the iPhone X, which will be discontinued now that three new iPhones are hitting the market. The XR, at $749 (compared to $999 for the XS), boasts a 6.1-inch LCD display and many of the same specs of the XS, minus the 3D Touch.

The XR comes in a variety of colors—six to be exact—and will drop in October.

Other updates

Apple also notified the crowd that their HomePod, retailing at $349, will have some new updates, including the ability to search song lyrics and set multiple timers at once.

Also, software updates: tvOS 12 with Dolby Atmos, watchOS 5, and iOS 12 will arrive on September 17th, and macOS Mojave arrives on September 24th.

Learn the latest trends, insights and best practices from the brightest minds in media and technology. Sign up for SMW Insider to watch full-length sessions from official Social Media Week conferences live and on-demand.

The post Apple Announces iPhone XS, XS Max, XR, Apple Watch 4 at 2018 Event appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2018/09/apple-announces-iphone-xs-xs-max-xr-apple-watch-4-at-2018-event/

People Say They’re Deleting Facebook, But Are They Really?

A recent poll shows that a good number of people, especially young people, are joining the #DeleteFacebook app from their phone. But here’s why no one, from Facebook to marketers to grandmothers who just figured out how Facebook works, should be worried.

According to the Pew Research Center, about 26 percent of polled adults said they’d deleted the Facebook app from their phone in the past year. Additionally, 42 percent said they’d taken a weeks-long break from the social media giant.

Young people in particular—18-29-year-olds—were much more likely to have deleted the app, which sounds like a problem for future growth.

And yet Facebook’s daily active user base has been steady at around 185 million for the last four quarters.

This is a good time to remind you that a poll, even one conducted by a prestigious organization like Pew Research, doesn’t always accurately reflect reality.

For one thing, the poll doesn’t check to see if users actually deleted Facebook’s app from their phone. We’re simply taking people’s word for it; Facebook, meanwhile, has hard numbers to back up their data. Pew also might not be able to take into account people they polled who deleted the app, then downloaded it again.

It’s also possible that people are continuing to join Facebook at around the same rate that users might be leaving it.

Finally, keep in mind that people who delete the app from their phone are by no means necessarily not using Facebook. They can still access the site from a desktop, or visit Facebook directly from the browsers on their phone. The site may not run as smoothly on an iPhone or Android device’s browser, but the mobile version is perfectly usable.

Facebook’s slowing user base growth is an issue for the platform, and Mark Zuckerberg’s company has had to make major changes after scandals relating to privacy and Russian influence in the 2016 election shook the public’s faith. But a supposed quarter of users “deleting” the app from their phone is not an outsized problem.

For marketers, the biggest dilemma isn’t that they don’t have enough potential users on Facebook to view their content—it’s getting their content seen above the rest in the wake of the recent algorithm shakeup.

Learn the latest trends, insights and best practices from the brightest minds in media and technology. Sign up for SMW Insider to watch full-length sessions from official Social Media Week conferences live and on-demand.

The post People Say They’re Deleting Facebook, But Are They Really? appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2018/09/people-say-theyre-deleting-facebook-but-are-they-really/

People Say They’re Deleting Facebook, But Are They Really?

A recent poll shows that a good number of people, especially young people, are joining the #DeleteFacebook app from their phone. But here’s why no one, from Facebook to marketers to grandmothers who just figured out how Facebook works, should be worried.

According to the Pew Research Center, about 26 percent of polled adults said they’d deleted the Facebook app from their phone in the past year. Additionally, 42 percent said they’d taken a weeks-long break from the social media giant.

Young people in particular—18-29-year-olds—were much more likely to have deleted the app, which sounds like a problem for future growth.

And yet Facebook’s daily active user base has been steady at around 185 million for the last four quarters.

This is a good time to remind you that a poll, even one conducted by a prestigious organization like Pew Research, doesn’t always accurately reflect reality.

For one thing, the poll doesn’t check to see if users actually deleted Facebook’s app from their phone. We’re simply taking people’s word for it; Facebook, meanwhile, has hard numbers to back up their data. Pew also might not be able to take into account people they polled who deleted the app, then downloaded it again.

It’s also possible that people are continuing to join Facebook at around the same rate that users might be leaving it.

Finally, keep in mind that people who delete the app from their phone are by no means necessarily not using Facebook. They can still access the site from a desktop, or visit Facebook directly from the browsers on their phone. The site may not run as smoothly on an iPhone or Android device’s browser, but the mobile version is perfectly usable.

Facebook’s slowing user base growth is an issue for the platform, and Mark Zuckerberg’s company has had to make major changes after scandals relating to privacy and Russian influence in the 2016 election shook the public’s faith. But a supposed quarter of users “deleting” the app from their phone is not an outsized problem.

For marketers, the biggest dilemma isn’t that they don’t have enough potential users on Facebook to view their content—it’s getting their content seen above the rest in the wake of the recent algorithm shakeup.

Learn the latest trends, insights and best practices from the brightest minds in media and technology. Sign up for SMW Insider to watch full-length sessions from official Social Media Week conferences live and on-demand.

The post People Say They’re Deleting Facebook, But Are They Really? appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2018/09/people-say-theyre-deleting-facebook-but-are-they-really/

American Express Is Making Smart Branded Content Millennials Will Love

American Express is joining the custom branded content game, and their foray into the space looks promising.

Rather than “shouting” at the mass market as they have since time immemorial, AmEx is launching smaller, focused campaigns with the help of young, millennial-focused platforms Buzzfeed, Vox, and Bustle, according to Digiday.

Seeking to have a meaningful impact with each concept, the credit card company is helping produce branded partnerships that provide real value to the millennial customers they want to reach to promote their “Pay It Plan It” feature.

We’ve taken notice of the rise of smart, engaging branded content of late, such as the branded podcasts that function as advertisements that people actually want to hear. AmEx clearly sees the trend of needing to create content that benefits the reader, viewer, listener, etc., and wants to deliver that content to places they know millennials will be going.

AmEx is teaming up with Buzzfeed in two areas: First, they’ll be the exclusive launch partner of the new Buzzfeed Reviews. They’ll also be the first sponsor of Buzzfeed Tasty’s “Friend in Town” show, the platform’s stab at the kind of tourism-and-food-and-experiences show in the vein of “No Reservations” and other travelogue shows.

With Vox, AmEx will sponsor The Goods by Vox, which includes 12 editorial videos and a newsletter, as well as Explainer videos (a format Vox has become famous for) about wise spending. They’ll also sponsor Eater’s Kitchen Gadget Test Show, with an emphasis on seeing which devices are worth the price.

For Bustle, AmEx will have custom illustrated articles with advice on making sound financial decisions, to be coupled with digital banner ads.

What are the main takeaways here?

Easy integration is key

The “four main passion areas” of AmEx card members are reportedly travel, entertainment, home, and tech. The content discussed above, which focuses on almost these exact spaces, are clear and obvious integrations for the brand and the product, which will help it from feeling forced or awkward.

This content could live without AmEx

If the AmEx logo and mentions of the brand were removed from almost all of these forms of content, they would still be useful and interesting to consumers. That’s by design: The videos, articles, and newsletters are just as informative and entertaining as non-branded content, but with a little extra emphasis on a specific tool (in this case, Pay It Plan It) to help things along.

This is just the beginning

According to Terryn Lance of AmEx, who spoke to Digiday, custom content will be the focus for AmEx going forward. Brands are getting smarter about where and how to meet the customers they’re trying to reach—so expect more of your content to feature brands cozied up to editorial in increasingly inventive ways.

Learn the latest trends, insights and best practices from the brightest minds in media and technology. Sign up for SMW Insider to watch full-length sessions from official Social Media Week conferences live and on-demand.

The post American Express Is Making Smart Branded Content Millennials Will Love appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2018/09/american-express-is-making-smart-branded-content-millennials-will-love/