Category: Marketing Advice

Open Future: Behind The Economist’s Successful Campaign

In 2018, The Economist, an incredibly forthright and expressive paper, ran a campaign to mark its 175th year. It took the entire “ignorance gets in the way of progress” ethos of its late founder, James Wilson, and invented the new initiative of an Open Future in order to remake the case of his liberal values.

The campaign

Conversations ran on all social media and platforms and a global event, that was a one day exercise, took place in Hong Kong, London, and New York simultaneously on the day of the companies founding. The campaign gained so much traction and maintained longevity that The Economist is running it again this year, on October 5th, this time in Chicago, Manchester and Hong Kong.

Join SMW Insider to watch this #SMWNYC session

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The company outlined it’s main KPI’s and started from there. They wanted to engage younger audiences for liberal thoughts and knew social media was the best way to do this. They also arranged intended conversations around five key topics: diversity and identity politics, free speech and debate, migration and refugees, free trade and economics and technology and innovation.

Create a central traffic hub

In order to run a campaign well, you must create a central hub to drive all your traffic to and accumulate your data. The Economist allowed audiences to have conversations in real time with journalists and third-party members on theirs. They also produced two videos each week which could be located in the hub, too. They ran podcasts, invited audiences to write their own essays, took a debate series around the top schools in the US and streamed it. They brought in people against the very essence of what they believed in order to reinforce the message of free speech and progress. This notion demanded attention and a reaction.

Promotional tactics

They also promoted their content by PR, display advertising, direct buys, interactive posters, and experiential marketing.

As a result, The Economist reached more than half a billion touches as result of the campaign. They touched 433.5m organic social, 76.9m paid, 50.2m engaged with content, 5.3m podcast downloads, 3.4m visitors on Open Future hub, (61% of whom were new – people they hadn’t seen in 90 days) and 9k new subscribers. The Open Future videos were seen by more than 1.8m new people.

Ultimately though, they hit their main KPI of attracting a younger demographic. The most popular age of those who engaged was 28-years-old. Their social media hit 44 million people around that age, too.

The Economist’s campaign highlights the key ingredients for a rewarding marketing campaign: create a central hub, integrate across various channels and put in solid and clear KPI’s so you can make sure everything is strong and measurable.

Join 100,000+ fellow marketers who advance their skills and knowledge by subscribing to our weekly newsletter.

WATCH OUR SMWLA 2019 PROMO

The post Open Future: Behind The Economist’s Successful Campaign appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/05/open-future-behind-the-economists-successful-campaign/

Open Future: Behind The Economist’s Successful Campaign

In 2018, The Economist, an incredibly forthright and expressive paper, ran a campaign to mark its 175th year. It took the entire “ignorance gets in the way of progress” ethos of its late founder, James Wilson, and invented the new initiative of an Open Future in order to remake the case of his liberal values.

The campaign

Conversations ran on all social media and platforms and a global event, that was a one day exercise, took place in Hong Kong, London, and New York simultaneously on the day of the companies founding. The campaign gained so much traction and maintained longevity that The Economist is running it again this year, on October 5th, this time in Chicago, Manchester and Hong Kong.

Join SMW Insider to watch this #SMWNYC session

Subscribe

The company outlined it’s main KPI’s and started from there. They wanted to engage younger audiences for liberal thoughts and knew social media was the best way to do this. They also arranged intended conversations around five key topics: diversity and identity politics, free speech and debate, migration and refugees, free trade and economics and technology and innovation.

Create a central traffic hub

In order to run a campaign well, you must create a central hub to drive all your traffic to and accumulate your data. The Economist allowed audiences to have conversations in real time with journalists and third-party members on theirs. They also produced two videos each week which could be located in the hub, too. They ran podcasts, invited audiences to write their own essays, took a debate series around the top schools in the US and streamed it. They brought in people against the very essence of what they believed in order to reinforce the message of free speech and progress. This notion demanded attention and a reaction.

Promotional tactics

They also promoted their content by PR, display advertising, direct buys, interactive posters, and experiential marketing.

As a result, The Economist reached more than half a billion touches as result of the campaign. They touched 433.5m organic social, 76.9m paid, 50.2m engaged with content, 5.3m podcast downloads, 3.4m visitors on Open Future hub, (61% of whom were new – people they hadn’t seen in 90 days) and 9k new subscribers. The Open Future videos were seen by more than 1.8m new people.

Ultimately though, they hit their main KPI of attracting a younger demographic. The most popular age of those who engaged was 28-years-old. Their social media hit 44 million people around that age, too.

The Economist’s campaign highlights the key ingredients for a rewarding marketing campaign: create a central hub, integrate across various channels and put in solid and clear KPI’s so you can make sure everything is strong and measurable.

Join 100,000+ fellow marketers who advance their skills and knowledge by subscribing to our weekly newsletter.

WATCH OUR SMWLA 2019 PROMO

The post Open Future: Behind The Economist’s Successful Campaign appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/05/open-future-behind-the-economists-successful-campaign/

Open Future: Behind The Economist’s Successful Campaign

In 2018, The Economist, an incredibly forthright and expressive paper, ran a campaign to mark its 175th year. It took the entire “ignorance gets in the way of progress” ethos of its late founder, James Wilson, and invented the new initiative of an Open Future in order to remake the case of his liberal values.

The campaign

Conversations ran on all social media and platforms and a global event, that was a one day exercise, took place in Hong Kong, London, and New York simultaneously on the day of the companies founding. The campaign gained so much traction and maintained longevity that The Economist is running it again this year, on October 5th, this time in Chicago, Manchester and Hong Kong.

Join SMW Insider to watch this #SMWNYC session

Subscribe

The company outlined it’s main KPI’s and started from there. They wanted to engage younger audiences for liberal thoughts and knew social media was the best way to do this. They also arranged intended conversations around five key topics: diversity and identity politics, free speech and debate, migration and refugees, free trade and economics and technology and innovation.

Create a central traffic hub

In order to run a campaign well, you must create a central hub to drive all your traffic to and accumulate your data. The Economist allowed audiences to have conversations in real time with journalists and third-party members on theirs. They also produced two videos each week which could be located in the hub, too. They ran podcasts, invited audiences to write their own essays, took a debate series around the top schools in the US and streamed it. They brought in people against the very essence of what they believed in order to reinforce the message of free speech and progress. This notion demanded attention and a reaction.

Promotional tactics

They also promoted their content by PR, display advertising, direct buys, interactive posters, and experiential marketing.

As a result, The Economist reached more than half a billion touches as result of the campaign. They touched 433.5m organic social, 76.9m paid, 50.2m engaged with content, 5.3m podcast downloads, 3.4m visitors on Open Future hub, (61% of whom were new – people they hadn’t seen in 90 days) and 9k new subscribers. The Open Future videos were seen by more than 1.8m new people.

Ultimately though, they hit their main KPI of attracting a younger demographic. The most popular age of those who engaged was 28-years-old. Their social media hit 44 million people around that age, too.

The Economist’s campaign highlights the key ingredients for a rewarding marketing campaign: create a central hub, integrate across various channels and put in solid and clear KPI’s so you can make sure everything is strong and measurable.

Join 100,000+ fellow marketers who advance their skills and knowledge by subscribing to our weekly newsletter.

WATCH OUR SMWLA 2019 PROMO

The post Open Future: Behind The Economist’s Successful Campaign appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/05/open-future-behind-the-economists-successful-campaign/

The Strong Link Between Diversity and Innovation: Insights from Salesforce and TBWA/Worldwide

Platforms are transforming to better acknowledge real-life demographics of users across traditional and social platforms. Fifty percent of the US population under 35  are people of color and 50% of the global population are women, after all.

How can we get more action from conversations about diversifying platforms and invite more users to become part of the creative process?

Join SMW Insider to watch this #SMWNYC session

Subscribe

Doug Melville, Chief Diversity Officer of TBWA\Worldwide in North America, sat down with Lola Banjo, Strategy Innovation Executive at Salesforce, during #SMWNYC to talk about the opportunities for women and people of color within a creative and digital space, among other topics.

Here are a few highlights from the conversation.

Diversity is a business imperative

While Melville’s role within diversity at TBWA\Worldwide is significant, he himself began the discussion by saying it is key that a diversity officer not always be in charge of the matter, rather turn to people who know about innovation, like Banjo, to look past an established “recipe” for diversity issues.

“People that are not in the diversity role, talking about diversity is so important because you recognize that it’s not because they’re doing their job. It’s because it is important. Diversity is a business imperative. It’s something that is going to drive real, meaningful change in our world, but it’s also driving real business results,” Banjo agreed.

The message of diversity has to be owned by a given organization or brand and “embedded in the DNA,” Banjo said.

Banjo inclusively went beyond the sentiment of variety and included research that can attest to the importance of diversity within a business, citing that companies which are gender diverse are 15% more likely to outperform. Companies that are ethnically diverse are 35% more likely to outperform. It is an undeniable win-win for all.

Innovation without inclusion fails its consumers

When testing for an audience, Banjo says she strives to find a person that is very different from herself, or her team.

“[We] dig into how we can solve for this persona that’s different,” she said, adding that it could be a middle-aged disabled woman who could most benefit from a given product if it is designed with her in mind.

Need a bigger example?

Banjo talked about a research study out of the University of Virginia which showed that women were more likely to be injured in car accidents because the crash-test dummies that product designers used were shaped as males. “I think the statistic was around 71% chance of [women] being moderately injured in an accident,” she said.

Opportunity through diverse thinking

Any medium of communication serves as a voice and is a way to connect with others, Banjo reminded people. But consumers are the ones who pick what thought patterns or conversations they want to be a part of.

Within social media, for instance, consumers can more quickly voice their takes or concerns to a company as opposed to before, when they needed to utilize snail mail or find a way to phone the headquarters.

“You can go on Twitter connect directly with a brand, you can connect with the people that are influencing that thought at the organization. It’s forcing companies to think differently as well, to think about the fact that if they do something unnecessarily wrong, it can travel through social media within a day,” she said.

Thus, the focus on diversity can make or break a brand, quickly.

Diversity just is

Banjo’s goal is to emphasize that brand and product design should not be limited to itself, but should instead consider how it will design a better world. Yet, ultimately, she hopes there will be no need for an extensive talk on diversity.

“I’m looking forward to a future where we don’t have to have a diversity conversation anymore. Where we are doing it because it just is,” she said, versus having to strategize on how to include different people.

Join 100,000+ fellow marketers who advance their skills and knowledge by subscribing to our weekly newsletter.

WATCH OUR SMWLA 2019 PROMO

The post The Strong Link Between Diversity and Innovation: Insights from Salesforce and TBWA/Worldwide appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/05/the-strong-link-between-diversity-and-innovation-insights-from-salesforce-and-tbwa-worldwide/

The Strong Link Between Diversity and Innovation: Insights from Salesforce and TBWA/Worldwide

Platforms are transforming to better acknowledge real-life demographics of users across traditional and social platforms. Fifty percent of the US population under 35  are people of color and 50% of the global population are women, after all.

How can we get more action from conversations about diversifying platforms and invite more users to become part of the creative process?

Join SMW Insider to watch this #SMWNYC session

Subscribe

Doug Melville, Chief Diversity Officer of TBWA\Worldwide in North America, sat down with Lola Banjo, Strategy Innovation Executive at Salesforce, during #SMWNYC to talk about the opportunities for women and people of color within a creative and digital space, among other topics.

Here are a few highlights from the conversation.

Diversity is a business imperative

While Melville’s role within diversity at TBWA\Worldwide is significant, he himself began the discussion by saying it is key that a diversity officer not always be in charge of the matter, rather turn to people who know about innovation, like Banjo, to look past an established “recipe” for diversity issues.

“People that are not in the diversity role, talking about diversity is so important because you recognize that it’s not because they’re doing their job. It’s because it is important. Diversity is a business imperative. It’s something that is going to drive real, meaningful change in our world, but it’s also driving real business results,” Banjo agreed.

The message of diversity has to be owned by a given organization or brand and “embedded in the DNA,” Banjo said.

Banjo inclusively went beyond the sentiment of variety and included research that can attest to the importance of diversity within a business, citing that companies which are gender diverse are 15% more likely to outperform. Companies that are ethnically diverse are 35% more likely to outperform. It is an undeniable win-win for all.

Innovation without inclusion fails its consumers

When testing for an audience, Banjo says she strives to find a person that is very different from herself, or her team.

“[We] dig into how we can solve for this persona that’s different,” she said, adding that it could be a middle-aged disabled woman who could most benefit from a given product if it is designed with her in mind.

Need a bigger example?

Banjo talked about a research study out of the University of Virginia which showed that women were more likely to be injured in car accidents because the crash-test dummies that product designers used were shaped as males. “I think the statistic was around 71% chance of [women] being moderately injured in an accident,” she said.

Opportunity through diverse thinking

Any medium of communication serves as a voice and is a way to connect with others, Banjo reminded people. But consumers are the ones who pick what thought patterns or conversations they want to be a part of.

Within social media, for instance, consumers can more quickly voice their takes or concerns to a company as opposed to before, when they needed to utilize snail mail or find a way to phone the headquarters.

“You can go on Twitter connect directly with a brand, you can connect with the people that are influencing that thought at the organization. It’s forcing companies to think differently as well, to think about the fact that if they do something unnecessarily wrong, it can travel through social media within a day,” she said.

Thus, the focus on diversity can make or break a brand, quickly.

Diversity just is

Banjo’s goal is to emphasize that brand and product design should not be limited to itself, but should instead consider how it will design a better world. Yet, ultimately, she hopes there will be no need for an extensive talk on diversity.

“I’m looking forward to a future where we don’t have to have a diversity conversation anymore. Where we are doing it because it just is,” she said, versus having to strategize on how to include different people.

Join 100,000+ fellow marketers who advance their skills and knowledge by subscribing to our weekly newsletter.

WATCH OUR SMWLA 2019 PROMO

The post The Strong Link Between Diversity and Innovation: Insights from Salesforce and TBWA/Worldwide appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/05/the-strong-link-between-diversity-and-innovation-insights-from-salesforce-and-tbwa-worldwide/

The Strong Link Between Diversity and Innovation: Insights from Salesforce and TBWA/Worldwide

Platforms are transforming to better acknowledge real-life demographics of users across traditional and social platforms. Fifty percent of the US population under 35  are people of color and 50% of the global population are women, after all.

How can we get more action from conversations about diversifying platforms and invite more users to become part of the creative process?

Join SMW Insider to watch this #SMWNYC session

Subscribe

Doug Melville, Chief Diversity Officer of TBWA\Worldwide in North America, sat down with Lola Banjo, Strategy Innovation Executive at Salesforce, during #SMWNYC to talk about the opportunities for women and people of color within a creative and digital space, among other topics.

Here are a few highlights from the conversation.

Diversity is a business imperative

While Melville’s role within diversity at TBWA\Worldwide is significant, he himself began the discussion by saying it is key that a diversity officer not always be in charge of the matter, rather turn to people who know about innovation, like Banjo, to look past an established “recipe” for diversity issues.

“People that are not in the diversity role, talking about diversity is so important because you recognize that it’s not because they’re doing their job. It’s because it is important. Diversity is a business imperative. It’s something that is going to drive real, meaningful change in our world, but it’s also driving real business results,” Banjo agreed.

The message of diversity has to be owned by a given organization or brand and “embedded in the DNA,” Banjo said.

Banjo inclusively went beyond the sentiment of variety and included research that can attest to the importance of diversity within a business, citing that companies which are gender diverse are 15% more likely to outperform. Companies that are ethnically diverse are 35% more likely to outperform. It is an undeniable win-win for all.

Innovation without inclusion fails its consumers

When testing for an audience, Banjo says she strives to find a person that is very different from herself, or her team.

“[We] dig into how we can solve for this persona that’s different,” she said, adding that it could be a middle-aged disabled woman who could most benefit from a given product if it is designed with her in mind.

Need a bigger example?

Banjo talked about a research study out of the University of Virginia which showed that women were more likely to be injured in car accidents because the crash-test dummies that product designers used were shaped as males. “I think the statistic was around 71% chance of [women] being moderately injured in an accident,” she said.

Opportunity through diverse thinking

Any medium of communication serves as a voice and is a way to connect with others, Banjo reminded people. But consumers are the ones who pick what thought patterns or conversations they want to be a part of.

Within social media, for instance, consumers can more quickly voice their takes or concerns to a company as opposed to before, when they needed to utilize snail mail or find a way to phone the headquarters.

“You can go on Twitter connect directly with a brand, you can connect with the people that are influencing that thought at the organization. It’s forcing companies to think differently as well, to think about the fact that if they do something unnecessarily wrong, it can travel through social media within a day,” she said.

Thus, the focus on diversity can make or break a brand, quickly.

Diversity just is

Banjo’s goal is to emphasize that brand and product design should not be limited to itself, but should instead consider how it will design a better world. Yet, ultimately, she hopes there will be no need for an extensive talk on diversity.

“I’m looking forward to a future where we don’t have to have a diversity conversation anymore. Where we are doing it because it just is,” she said, versus having to strategize on how to include different people.

Join 100,000+ fellow marketers who advance their skills and knowledge by subscribing to our weekly newsletter.

WATCH OUR SMWLA 2019 PROMO

The post The Strong Link Between Diversity and Innovation: Insights from Salesforce and TBWA/Worldwide appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/05/the-strong-link-between-diversity-and-innovation-insights-from-salesforce-and-tbwa-worldwide/

The Strong Link Between Diversity and Innovation: Insights from Salesforce and TBWA/Worldwide

Platforms are transforming to better acknowledge real-life demographics of users across traditional and social platforms. Fifty percent of the US population under 35  are people of color and 50% of the global population are women, after all.

How can we get more action from conversations about diversifying platforms and invite more users to become part of the creative process?

Join SMW Insider to watch this #SMWNYC session

Subscribe

Doug Melville, Chief Diversity Officer of TBWA\Worldwide in North America, sat down with Lola Banjo, Strategy Innovation Executive at Salesforce, during #SMWNYC to talk about the opportunities for women and people of color within a creative and digital space, among other topics.

Here are a few highlights from the conversation.

Diversity is a business imperative

While Melville’s role within diversity at TBWA\Worldwide is significant, he himself began the discussion by saying it is key that a diversity officer not always be in charge of the matter, rather turn to people who know about innovation, like Banjo, to look past an established “recipe” for diversity issues.

“People that are not in the diversity role, talking about diversity is so important because you recognize that it’s not because they’re doing their job. It’s because it is important. Diversity is a business imperative. It’s something that is going to drive real, meaningful change in our world, but it’s also driving real business results,” Banjo agreed.

The message of diversity has to be owned by a given organization or brand and “embedded in the DNA,” Banjo said.

Banjo inclusively went beyond the sentiment of variety and included research that can attest to the importance of diversity within a business, citing that companies which are gender diverse are 15% more likely to outperform. Companies that are ethnically diverse are 35% more likely to outperform. It is an undeniable win-win for all.

Innovation without inclusion fails its consumers

When testing for an audience, Banjo says she strives to find a person that is very different from herself, or her team.

“[We] dig into how we can solve for this persona that’s different,” she said, adding that it could be a middle-aged disabled woman who could most benefit from a given product if it is designed with her in mind.

Need a bigger example?

Banjo talked about a research study out of the University of Virginia which showed that women were more likely to be injured in car accidents because the crash-test dummies that product designers used were shaped as males. “I think the statistic was around 71% chance of [women] being moderately injured in an accident,” she said.

Opportunity through diverse thinking

Any medium of communication serves as a voice and is a way to connect with others, Banjo reminded people. But consumers are the ones who pick what thought patterns or conversations they want to be a part of.

Within social media, for instance, consumers can more quickly voice their takes or concerns to a company as opposed to before, when they needed to utilize snail mail or find a way to phone the headquarters.

“You can go on Twitter connect directly with a brand, you can connect with the people that are influencing that thought at the organization. It’s forcing companies to think differently as well, to think about the fact that if they do something unnecessarily wrong, it can travel through social media within a day,” she said.

Thus, the focus on diversity can make or break a brand, quickly.

Diversity just is

Banjo’s goal is to emphasize that brand and product design should not be limited to itself, but should instead consider how it will design a better world. Yet, ultimately, she hopes there will be no need for an extensive talk on diversity.

“I’m looking forward to a future where we don’t have to have a diversity conversation anymore. Where we are doing it because it just is,” she said, versus having to strategize on how to include different people.

Join 100,000+ fellow marketers who advance their skills and knowledge by subscribing to our weekly newsletter.

WATCH OUR SMWLA 2019 PROMO

The post The Strong Link Between Diversity and Innovation: Insights from Salesforce and TBWA/Worldwide appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/05/the-strong-link-between-diversity-and-innovation-insights-from-salesforce-and-tbwa-worldwide/

Digital Storytelling: Simple and Effective Ways to Create the Right Perspective for Your Business from Leo Burnett

For leading brands today, connection is key to a successful advertising campaign. If consumers feel they have a relationship with a business, then they will invest and make it their own – most probably for life.

During #SMWNYC representatives from some of the world’s leading brands including Johnson & Johnson, Leo Burnett, Diageo, and EquityProjectForAll came together to discuss their tactics for winning the hearts and minds of consumers with stories that penetrate and reverberate long after the campaign is done.

Join SMW Insider to watch this #SMWNYC session

Subscribe

Leveraging stories behind brands that have transformed their marketing techniques, the panelists identified ways to craft social content based on platform, audience, and campaign objective, how to integrate brand purpose authentically into social strategies, and ways to amplify your brand’s story through VR, AR, and AI to fuel engagement.

Here are three simple but effective perspectives shared during the conversation.

Do the research and create meaning.

Karuna Rawal and the #AlwaysLikeAGirl Campaign by Always.

The clever campaign shows various demographics in America being asked to do something like a girl.

All give accurate imitations of what society implies girls to do – running with arms waving – fighting with eyes closed – throwing with their wrists flared.

It highlights the female cliché and generates the perspective of the women; their audience.

“We found out through the data that typically, women lose their confidence as a result of puberty,” said Karuna Rawal, President, Groupe Client Lead, Leo Burnett.

The advert then asks females aged between 7 and 11 to do something like a girl. At this point, the young girls fight with as tough as they physically can; run as fast as they physically can; and throw like as hard as they physically can, expressing courageous confidence.

“We had the opportunity to connect with our purpose – empowering women – while bringing it together with the data – how girls confidence plummets through puberty,” added Rawal.

It just goes to show how successful a campaign can be by connecting with the perspective of the consumer.

Rawal described how women grew tired of seeing a product demonstrated to them as a way of getting them to invest.

Don’t be fake.

Neutrogena pioneered the use of the no-retouch image to show how effective their product is.

Paired with partnerships with selected celebrity, Neutrogena could leverage its brand identity to generate effective results.

By showing the perspective of their consumer through the gaze of celebrity, it generated an appeal that their consumer could trust.

The secret was in confronting what was already known.

“The goal was to really leverage our purpose and speak it through our advertising campaign” said Edlynne Laryea, Director, Global Neutrogena Digital Transformation and Sustainability, Johnson & Johnson.

If consumers know that what they see being advertised on television is a lie, then that insult isn’t going to translate into sales.

This ethos was put to the test in Neutrogena’s Valentine’s Day campaign where two actors without a script simply had some fun with the product. Simple, but effective.

“It was really important for us to tell an authentic story without any pretense. They weren’t holding up the bottle or saying use Neutrogena,” explained Laryea.

The Honest Story.

How does a Russian sounding vodka appeal to the US? By telling the honest story.

“In the US the perception is something we really have to work on,” said Jay Sethi, Vice President, Smirnoff & Nurture Brands Portfolio, Diageo.

The man behind the infamous Smirnoff ad ‘Made in America: but we’d be happy to talk about Russia under oath.’

Brands, especially old brands like Smirnoff, have long histories. More often than not, this can be great for companies – American brands emphasis their Americanness in the act of patriotism; and why not?

For Smirnoff however, history wasn’t in their favor, or at least for the time being.

Smirnoff was an American company with a Russian name – as a result of American immigration Smirnoff has a Russian name. Their history pointed out that only the affluent drank Smirnoff in Russia and they wanted to keep it that way.

“Russia just wanted Smirnoff to be for them, they wanted it to be for the Tsar’s, it was the best Vodka you could have, and they wanted it for themselves. Our founders said we want it to be for the people,” explained Sethi.

Telling the story of how Smirnoff was created in America because Russia opposed their distribution, creates a positive perspective for the American consumer and flips what was first thought of as a negative history, into a promising one.

Join 100,000+ fellow marketers who advance their skills and knowledge by subscribing to our weekly newsletter.

WATCH OUR SMWLA 2019 PROMO

The post Digital Storytelling: Simple and Effective Ways to Create the Right Perspective for Your Business from Leo Burnett appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/05/digital-storytelling-simple-and-effective-ways-to-create-the-right-perspective-for-your-business-from-leo-burnett/

Digital Storytelling: Simple and Effective Ways to Create the Right Perspective for Your Business from Leo Burnett

For leading brands today, connection is key to a successful advertising campaign. If consumers feel they have a relationship with a business, then they will invest and make it their own – most probably for life.

During #SMWNYC representatives from some of the world’s leading brands including Johnson & Johnson, Leo Burnett, Diageo, and EquityProjectForAll came together to discuss their tactics for winning the hearts and minds of consumers with stories that penetrate and reverberate long after the campaign is done.

Join SMW Insider to watch this #SMWNYC session

Subscribe

Leveraging stories behind brands that have transformed their marketing techniques, the panelists identified ways to craft social content based on platform, audience, and campaign objective, how to integrate brand purpose authentically into social strategies, and ways to amplify your brand’s story through VR, AR, and AI to fuel engagement.

Here are three simple but effective perspectives shared during the conversation.

Do the research and create meaning.

Karuna Rawal and the #AlwaysLikeAGirl Campaign by Always.

The clever campaign shows various demographics in America being asked to do something like a girl.

All give accurate imitations of what society implies girls to do – running with arms waving – fighting with eyes closed – throwing with their wrists flared.

It highlights the female cliché and generates the perspective of the women; their audience.

“We found out through the data that typically, women lose their confidence as a result of puberty,” said Karuna Rawal, President, Groupe Client Lead, Leo Burnett.

The advert then asks females aged between 7 and 11 to do something like a girl. At this point, the young girls fight with as tough as they physically can; run as fast as they physically can; and throw like as hard as they physically can, expressing courageous confidence.

“We had the opportunity to connect with our purpose – empowering women – while bringing it together with the data – how girls confidence plummets through puberty,” added Rawal.

It just goes to show how successful a campaign can be by connecting with the perspective of the consumer.

Rawal described how women grew tired of seeing a product demonstrated to them as a way of getting them to invest.

Don’t be fake.

Neutrogena pioneered the use of the no-retouch image to show how effective their product is.

Paired with partnerships with selected celebrity, Neutrogena could leverage its brand identity to generate effective results.

By showing the perspective of their consumer through the gaze of celebrity, it generated an appeal that their consumer could trust.

The secret was in confronting what was already known.

“The goal was to really leverage our purpose and speak it through our advertising campaign” said Edlynne Laryea, Director, Global Neutrogena Digital Transformation and Sustainability, Johnson & Johnson.

If consumers know that what they see being advertised on television is a lie, then that insult isn’t going to translate into sales.

This ethos was put to the test in Neutrogena’s Valentine’s Day campaign where two actors without a script simply had some fun with the product. Simple, but effective.

“It was really important for us to tell an authentic story without any pretense. They weren’t holding up the bottle or saying use Neutrogena,” explained Laryea.

The Honest Story.

How does a Russian sounding vodka appeal to the US? By telling the honest story.

“In the US the perception is something we really have to work on,” said Jay Sethi, Vice President, Smirnoff & Nurture Brands Portfolio, Diageo.

The man behind the infamous Smirnoff ad ‘Made in America: but we’d be happy to talk about Russia under oath.’

Brands, especially old brands like Smirnoff, have long histories. More often than not, this can be great for companies – American brands emphasis their Americanness in the act of patriotism; and why not?

For Smirnoff however, history wasn’t in their favor, or at least for the time being.

Smirnoff was an American company with a Russian name – as a result of American immigration Smirnoff has a Russian name. Their history pointed out that only the affluent drank Smirnoff in Russia and they wanted to keep it that way.

“Russia just wanted Smirnoff to be for them, they wanted it to be for the Tsar’s, it was the best Vodka you could have, and they wanted it for themselves. Our founders said we want it to be for the people,” explained Sethi.

Telling the story of how Smirnoff was created in America because Russia opposed their distribution, creates a positive perspective for the American consumer and flips what was first thought of as a negative history, into a promising one.

Join 100,000+ fellow marketers who advance their skills and knowledge by subscribing to our weekly newsletter.

WATCH OUR SMWLA 2019 PROMO

The post Digital Storytelling: Simple and Effective Ways to Create the Right Perspective for Your Business from Leo Burnett appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/05/digital-storytelling-simple-and-effective-ways-to-create-the-right-perspective-for-your-business-from-leo-burnett/

Digital Storytelling: Simple and Effective Ways to Create the Right Perspective for Your Business from Leo Burnett

For leading brands today, connection is key to a successful advertising campaign. If consumers feel they have a relationship with a business, then they will invest and make it their own – most probably for life.

During #SMWNYC representatives from some of the world’s leading brands including Johnson & Johnson, Leo Burnett, Diageo, and EquityProjectForAll came together to discuss their tactics for winning the hearts and minds of consumers with stories that penetrate and reverberate long after the campaign is done.

Join SMW Insider to watch this #SMWNYC session

Subscribe

Leveraging stories behind brands that have transformed their marketing techniques, the panelists identified ways to craft social content based on platform, audience, and campaign objective, how to integrate brand purpose authentically into social strategies, and ways to amplify your brand’s story through VR, AR, and AI to fuel engagement.

Here are three simple but effective perspectives shared during the conversation.

Do the research and create meaning.

Karuna Rawal and the #AlwaysLikeAGirl Campaign by Always.

The clever campaign shows various demographics in America being asked to do something like a girl.

All give accurate imitations of what society implies girls to do – running with arms waving – fighting with eyes closed – throwing with their wrists flared.

It highlights the female cliché and generates the perspective of the women; their audience.

“We found out through the data that typically, women lose their confidence as a result of puberty,” said Karuna Rawal, President, Groupe Client Lead, Leo Burnett.

The advert then asks females aged between 7 and 11 to do something like a girl. At this point, the young girls fight with as tough as they physically can; run as fast as they physically can; and throw like as hard as they physically can, expressing courageous confidence.

“We had the opportunity to connect with our purpose – empowering women – while bringing it together with the data – how girls confidence plummets through puberty,” added Rawal.

It just goes to show how successful a campaign can be by connecting with the perspective of the consumer.

Rawal described how women grew tired of seeing a product demonstrated to them as a way of getting them to invest.

Don’t be fake.

Neutrogena pioneered the use of the no-retouch image to show how effective their product is.

Paired with partnerships with selected celebrity, Neutrogena could leverage its brand identity to generate effective results.

By showing the perspective of their consumer through the gaze of celebrity, it generated an appeal that their consumer could trust.

The secret was in confronting what was already known.

“The goal was to really leverage our purpose and speak it through our advertising campaign” said Edlynne Laryea, Director, Global Neutrogena Digital Transformation and Sustainability, Johnson & Johnson.

If consumers know that what they see being advertised on television is a lie, then that insult isn’t going to translate into sales.

This ethos was put to the test in Neutrogena’s Valentine’s Day campaign where two actors without a script simply had some fun with the product. Simple, but effective.

“It was really important for us to tell an authentic story without any pretense. They weren’t holding up the bottle or saying use Neutrogena,” explained Laryea.

The Honest Story.

How does a Russian sounding vodka appeal to the US? By telling the honest story.

“In the US the perception is something we really have to work on,” said Jay Sethi, Vice President, Smirnoff & Nurture Brands Portfolio, Diageo.

The man behind the infamous Smirnoff ad ‘Made in America: but we’d be happy to talk about Russia under oath.’

Brands, especially old brands like Smirnoff, have long histories. More often than not, this can be great for companies – American brands emphasis their Americanness in the act of patriotism; and why not?

For Smirnoff however, history wasn’t in their favor, or at least for the time being.

Smirnoff was an American company with a Russian name – as a result of American immigration Smirnoff has a Russian name. Their history pointed out that only the affluent drank Smirnoff in Russia and they wanted to keep it that way.

“Russia just wanted Smirnoff to be for them, they wanted it to be for the Tsar’s, it was the best Vodka you could have, and they wanted it for themselves. Our founders said we want it to be for the people,” explained Sethi.

Telling the story of how Smirnoff was created in America because Russia opposed their distribution, creates a positive perspective for the American consumer and flips what was first thought of as a negative history, into a promising one.

Join 100,000+ fellow marketers who advance their skills and knowledge by subscribing to our weekly newsletter.

WATCH OUR SMWLA 2019 PROMO

The post Digital Storytelling: Simple and Effective Ways to Create the Right Perspective for Your Business from Leo Burnett appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/05/digital-storytelling-simple-and-effective-ways-to-create-the-right-perspective-for-your-business-from-leo-burnett/

Digital Storytelling: Simple and Effective Ways to Create the Right Perspective for Your Business from Leo Burnett

For leading brands today, connection is key to a successful advertising campaign. If consumers feel they have a relationship with a business, then they will invest and make it their own – most probably for life.

During #SMWNYC representatives from some of the world’s leading brands including Johnson & Johnson, Leo Burnett, Diageo, and EquityProjectForAll came together to discuss their tactics for winning the hearts and minds of consumers with stories that penetrate and reverberate long after the campaign is done.

Join SMW Insider to watch this #SMWNYC session

Subscribe

Leveraging stories behind brands that have transformed their marketing techniques, the panelists identified ways to craft social content based on platform, audience, and campaign objective, how to integrate brand purpose authentically into social strategies, and ways to amplify your brand’s story through VR, AR, and AI to fuel engagement.

Here are three simple but effective perspectives shared during the conversation.

Do the research and create meaning.

Karuna Rawal and the #AlwaysLikeAGirl Campaign by Always.

The clever campaign shows various demographics in America being asked to do something like a girl.

All give accurate imitations of what society implies girls to do – running with arms waving – fighting with eyes closed – throwing with their wrists flared.

It highlights the female cliché and generates the perspective of the women; their audience.

“We found out through the data that typically, women lose their confidence as a result of puberty,” said Karuna Rawal, President, Groupe Client Lead, Leo Burnett.

The advert then asks females aged between 7 and 11 to do something like a girl. At this point, the young girls fight with as tough as they physically can; run as fast as they physically can; and throw like as hard as they physically can, expressing courageous confidence.

“We had the opportunity to connect with our purpose – empowering women – while bringing it together with the data – how girls confidence plummets through puberty,” added Rawal.

It just goes to show how successful a campaign can be by connecting with the perspective of the consumer.

Rawal described how women grew tired of seeing a product demonstrated to them as a way of getting them to invest.

Don’t be fake.

Neutrogena pioneered the use of the no-retouch image to show how effective their product is.

Paired with partnerships with selected celebrity, Neutrogena could leverage its brand identity to generate effective results.

By showing the perspective of their consumer through the gaze of celebrity, it generated an appeal that their consumer could trust.

The secret was in confronting what was already known.

“The goal was to really leverage our purpose and speak it through our advertising campaign” said Edlynne Laryea, Director, Global Neutrogena Digital Transformation and Sustainability, Johnson & Johnson.

If consumers know that what they see being advertised on television is a lie, then that insult isn’t going to translate into sales.

This ethos was put to the test in Neutrogena’s Valentine’s Day campaign where two actors without a script simply had some fun with the product. Simple, but effective.

“It was really important for us to tell an authentic story without any pretense. They weren’t holding up the bottle or saying use Neutrogena,” explained Laryea.

The Honest Story.

How does a Russian sounding vodka appeal to the US? By telling the honest story.

“In the US the perception is something we really have to work on,” said Jay Sethi, Vice President, Smirnoff & Nurture Brands Portfolio, Diageo.

The man behind the infamous Smirnoff ad ‘Made in America: but we’d be happy to talk about Russia under oath.’

Brands, especially old brands like Smirnoff, have long histories. More often than not, this can be great for companies – American brands emphasis their Americanness in the act of patriotism; and why not?

For Smirnoff however, history wasn’t in their favor, or at least for the time being.

Smirnoff was an American company with a Russian name – as a result of American immigration Smirnoff has a Russian name. Their history pointed out that only the affluent drank Smirnoff in Russia and they wanted to keep it that way.

“Russia just wanted Smirnoff to be for them, they wanted it to be for the Tsar’s, it was the best Vodka you could have, and they wanted it for themselves. Our founders said we want it to be for the people,” explained Sethi.

Telling the story of how Smirnoff was created in America because Russia opposed their distribution, creates a positive perspective for the American consumer and flips what was first thought of as a negative history, into a promising one.

Join 100,000+ fellow marketers who advance their skills and knowledge by subscribing to our weekly newsletter.

WATCH OUR SMWLA 2019 PROMO

The post Digital Storytelling: Simple and Effective Ways to Create the Right Perspective for Your Business from Leo Burnett appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/05/digital-storytelling-simple-and-effective-ways-to-create-the-right-perspective-for-your-business-from-leo-burnett/

3 Overlooked Ways to Maximize Twitter for Your Business

Are you getting the most out of Twitter for your business? Check out these tips from contributor Dhariana Lozano.

https://www.socialmediatoday.com/news/3-overlooked-ways-to-maximize-twitter-for-your-business/555093/

7 Video Trends That Will Dominate in 2019 and Beyond [Infographic]

Video is the key content trend of the moment – here are some key video marketing trends that are gaining momentum.

https://www.socialmediatoday.com/news/7-video-trends-that-will-dominate-in-2019-and-beyond-infographic/555092/

7 Expert Strategies to Grow Your Marketing Agency

Looking to grow your digital agency? Here are some tips on how to do it – from people who've built hugely successful businesses.

https://www.socialmediatoday.com/news/7-expert-strategies-to-grow-your-marketing-agency/555091/

The Truth About Working in a Virtual World

If you’re thinking about establishing a virtual business, here are a few things I love about building relationships in a virtual world.

https://www.socialmediatoday.com/news/the-truth-about-working-in-a-virtual-world/555090/

Facebook Groups Targeted by Spammers in New Wave of Misuse

Facebook groups have been subject by a new attack from sabotage gangs who join, post offensive content, then report the group.

https://www.socialmediatoday.com/news/facebook-groups-targeted-by-spammers-in-new-wave-of-misuse/555083/

Twitter’s Testing a New Carousel Ad Format for App Install Campaigns

Twitter is testing out a new format of carousel ads for app install campaigns.

https://www.socialmediatoday.com/news/twitters-testing-a-new-carousel-ad-format-for-app-install-campaigns/555064/

SEO vs PPC: Which One Works Better? [Infographic]

In order to improve your exposure in search engines, you can turn to SEO and/or PPC – but which is a better choice for your business?

https://www.socialmediatoday.com/news/seo-vs-ppc-which-one-works-better-infographic/554906/

How to Cultivate Influencer Relationships for Successful Storytelling

Influencer marketing has exploded over the course of the past five years and shows no signs of slowing down as we approach the second half of 2019.

According to recent reports, the market is on pace to reach $10 billion by 2020 — up from $2 billion in 2017 — and influencer marketing ad spend is poised to reach between $5 billion and $10 billion in 2022. This will be fueled primarily by the nearly two-thirds (69%) of marketers who claim they plan to increase their spending on influencer marketing this year. For a quick YoY comparison, in 2018 only 39 percent of marketers planned to grow their influencer marketing budgets.

With additional traction and investment, the industry is becoming more accessible and measurable than ever before, resulting in a growing number of marketers finding influencer marketing effective in achieving their business goals. In spite of the benefits, however, we must find ways to navigate the complexities as the space matures and new players and cross-platform storytelling strategies enter the scene.

At #SMWLA, we have an exciting lineup of leading brands, platforms, and storytellers who will share actionable insights into the evolution of influencer marketing and what it means for storytelling efforts as part of our 2019 global theme. Names to bookmark as you build your itinerary include Edelman, Shopify Plus, Fullscreen, and Sundae.

A few highlights as to what topics the sessions will explore:

  • The role of influencers in the marketing funnel
  • How to build influencer partnerships that are both creative and strategic and will deliver on your messaging and campaign goals
  • What elements are crucial to a successful partnership, the challenges, and how to truly cultivate a relationship with creators beyond just a paycheck
  • What three ingredients drive story-led commerce (and the one killer mistake)
  • Why consumers crave brands with a mission and social consciousness as well as how to unleash UGC as your secret weapon

There’s still time to join us at the Broad Stage in Santa Monica June 12-13. Browse the current agenda and stay tuned for our full lineup being published next Tuesday, May 21st. Secure your pass by Friday, May 24th to take advantage of the current discount before it expires.

Join 100,000+ fellow marketers who advance their skills and knowledge by subscribing to our weekly newsletter.

WATCH OUR SMWLA 2019 PROMO

The post How to Cultivate Influencer Relationships for Successful Storytelling appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2019/05/how-to-cultivate-influencer-relationships-for-successful-storytelling/

100+ Social Media Stats to Help You Choose the Right Platform for Your Business [Infographic]

Which social platforms is your audience using? Check out this infographic.

https://www.socialmediatoday.com/news/100-social-media-stats-to-help-you-choose-the-right-platform-for-your-busi/554909/