Category: LinkedIn Tips

Top 5 Web Marketing Tips for New Business Startups and SME’s

1. Twitter Marketing

Set up a Twitter Account and Follow up to 5,000 of your target audience.

A large proportion will follow you back and those that don’t can be unfollowed so that you can follow some more.

This could be a particular niche or businesses / consumers in a certain geographical location. Whilst you are building followers and when you have thousands of followers, send out information, tips, offers, competitions and advice that would be useful and of interest to your target audience.

2. Facebook Marketing, Facebook Pages and Facebook Group Marketing

Use your personal Facebook account to connect with potential customers and partners, also create a Facebook Page and get your friends, potential partners and target audience (clients etc) to like and share your page. Whilst you are building likers & followers and when you have thousands of followers, send out information, tips, offers, competitions and advice that would be useful and of interest to your target audience.

You can also set up groups for your target audiences and get some of those to join your group where you can also share information, tips, offers, competitions and advice that would be useful and of interest to your target audience.

3. LinkedIn Marketing and LinkedIn Company Pages

Make sure you have a good LinkedIn profile page that covers everything that you do including all of your skills and which links to your company website, blog and Facebook page etc. Also add links to any video that you might have etc.

Also create a Company page on LinkedIn (you need an email address on a registered domain to do this) and regularly post information, tips, offers, competitions and advice that would be useful and of interest to your target audience via your LinkedIn company page and your regular posts facility on LinkedIn.

Finally on LinkedIn regularly connect with lots of people in your target audience on LinkedIn (but not to many all at once though as LinkedIn can block you). Also join lots of groups full of your target audience and connect with them via the group (Something linkedin allows you to do more aggressively than just connecting with people).

4. Blogging

Create a blog or ideally add a blog to your existing website or get a new website with a blog already included and start blogging regularly about your business, products and services etc.

This can help to improve the Seo of your website and get it associated with more keywords to help you get indexed more regularly the search engines and helping you to appear higher up and more often in the internet page ranks.

5. Keyword Content Marketing via content pages on your website

You should have an existing website or get a new website and create great keyword written landing pages for your business, as well as every single product and service and geographical area covered etc.
This will help to improve the Seo of your website and get it associated with more keywords to help you appear higher up and more often in the internet search engine page ranks helping you to get more enquiries.

If you need any help with any of the above please call: 07517 024979 or email: maconsultancy1@gmail.com

Interesting Article on Event Promotion using Eventbrite & LinkedIn with 9 great tips..

March 2015

Mark Williams

Event TypeJanuaryJob RoleMarketing

It goes without saying that the most important factor in event promotion is the quality, uniqueness and overall attractiveness of an event, but understanding how to leverage social media can also be key to its success these days.

With over 330 million members, LinkedIn is now pretty mainstream for people in business, so the chances that any of your prospective delegates are not on there is pretty remote. Yet as a regular speaker at events I am surprised at how few event organisers utilise LinkedIn effectively to attract attendees and I can only remember one occasion where I was asked to assist with promoting the event.

So here are my top 9 techniques to use LinkedIn for event marketing, and ensure your event is the most talked about and eagerly anticipated you have ever run.

  1. Status Update

The most obvious method of communication on LinkedIn is to post a personal update to your connections including a link to your website or Eventbrite page.

This would typically be done by typing a few lines and then copying the url and pasting it into the update – LinkedIn will then scan that page for images and let you choose which image to show in the update. Alternatively you could use a ‘share to LinkedIn’ button on the Eventbrite event page itself.

There is however an issue with both of these methods – most of your connections are likely to have pretty busy home page feeds and getting them to notice your update is not straightforward. The secret to drawing attention to your update is to use large, eye catching images and whilst the above methods will show an image, it will be about 1/3rd of the size of an image that you post directly from your computer.To add a more prominent image, simply click on the paperclip symbol in the update field to add your image. It is also important to make the post interesting and engaging by posing a question, as this will increase the possibility of people who you are not connected with seeing it.

  1. Published post

You can now publish your own long form content directly onto LinkedIn, which is a great way to boost your events’ numbers by doing some content marketing using this highly effective native tool.

Essentially, the ‘Published post’ tool provides an opportunity to reach a much wider audience (you can also share it via a status update). The key to publishing is to get your post into one of the Pulse channels.

This way you will reach a different and potentially much bigger audience than just your connections on LinkedIn. Getting published in a channel requires a post that satisfies the criteria of the LinkedIn algorithm to be seen as ‘relevant and interesting’. LinkedIn keep this a closely guarded secret but you can get some clues by looking at the posts that already feature in your chosen channel.

Always make the post interesting and engaging by challenging the reader and asking questions, this will also increase the chances of getting it into a channel. 

  1. Direct message

You can’t be shy when promoting an event, so you should be familiar with contacting people directly. You can send 3 types of direct messages on LinkedIn:

  • This is the paid method of communicating on LinkedIn. An InMail can be sent to anyone provided you have credits which come with premium accounts or they can be purchased separately.
  • First tier connection message.You can send a free direct message to anyone you are connected with and you can send one message to up to 50 connections by simply typing their name into the ‘send to’ field. Note – remember to de-select the ‘show email addresses’ box at the bottom.
  • Group message.If you share a group with someone you can send them a free, direct message by simply finding them (members tab) in the group and clicking on the ‘send message’ link. 
  1. Email

If you are connected to someone you can see their email address in the ‘contact info’ section of their profile. In addition you can download all your first tier connections, including their email addresses onto a spreadsheet from the ‘keep in touch’ settings

This needs to be handled carefully though because connecting with someone is not the same as joining their list and giving them permission to email you – this could be considered to be spam. If you do take the route to promote your event, make sure it is explicit where you got their email, and make it very easy for them to opt-out of any future email updates.

  1. Company page update

You can also send status updates from a company page (provided you have administrator rights). Company pages cannot connect to people but individuals can chose to follow the updates from your company page. This will normally be a more limited audience (depending on the size and familiarity of your brand), but it is still a good place to keep people informed about your event news.

  1. Create a showcase page

Showcase pages are separate subsections of a company page that have their own followers. You could create a showcase page for your event and ask relevant people to follow it, this will then allow you to post regular updates about the event. 

  1. Create a group

Groups are designed to be community based discussion forums and they can be a very useful feature for publicising and running events. Create a group specifically for the event and invite people to join – this can include delegates, organisers and speakers.

You can create discussions about the subjects that will be covered during the event and ask the relevant speakers to contribute. This will help the speaker to gauge the audience and create a greater buzz around the event. In addition the discussions could continue after the event allowing delegates to remain in contact with the speakers and other delegates. 

  1. Speaker posts

If your event involves speakers then ask them to write an overview of their talk and pose questions that are pertinent to the subject. They could publish this as a post on their own profile which you could then share or just send you the copy and you could publish it from your profile making sure that you quote their name in any status updates you post to promote the post (assuming they are a connection, quoting their name will alert them of this and link to their profile).

  1. Advertising

There are two ways you can post paid adverts on LinkedIn. You can buy an advert block which works in a very similar way to Google adwords but by far the most effective method is a sponsored update. 

This method allows your update to be specifically targeted at anyone on LinkedIn (location, job title, seniority, industry etc) as opposed to just your connections. Updates are more likely to be seen than a standard ad posting because users browse through their update stream, in addition sponsored updates can also be seen via mobile and tablet apps and over 50% of LinkedIn traffic now comes via apps.

Conclusion

So there you have it, 9 ways to use LinkedIn for event marketing. All of these methods can have a significant impact, but if promoting your events is all you do on LinkedIn, they will be much less effective.

The key to communicating effectively on LinkedIn (as in any marketing) is to post regular, useful and interesting content that is not only about selling you or your events, because this then earns you the right to occasionally post something of a more promotional nature.

If you are a connection and the only time I see anything from you its a promotional update, post or message then I will quickly learn to ignore you.

A healthy and effective ratio should be one promotional update in every four.

Good luck with your next event!

Interesting Article on Event Promotion using Eventbrite & LinkedIn with 9 great tips page posted “By Mike Armstrong”

Increase your #Twitter #LinkedIn & #Facebook audience reach!

If you have something to promote to your audience of Twitter Followers, Facebook Friends or Business Page Likers or LinkedIn Contacts, such as an event, a new product launch or an offer use an automated software took like Hootsuite or Buffer to help you reach more of your audience.

You can schedule posts to go out before you get up, at times when your too busy to post, days you are off and times when your a sleep to help you reach more if your audience then you could be manual tweeting and posting alone.

Set up a campaign similar to a TV or radio campaign and get your message across over a sustained period of time depending on what it is that you are promoting.

The Increase your #Twitter #LinkedIn & #Facebook audience reach page was posted “By Mike Armstrong”

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Social Media Tip about increasing your audience reach!

If you have something to promote to your audience of Twitter Followers, Facebook Friends or Business Page Likers or LinkedIn Contacts, such as an event, a new product launch or an offer use an automated software took like Hootsuite or Buffer to help you reach more of your audience.

You can schedule posts to go out before you get up, at times when your too busy to post, days you are off and times when your a sleep to help you reach more if your audience then you could be manual tweeting and posting alone.

Set up a campaign similar to a TV or radio campaign and get your message across over a sustained period of time depending on what it is that you are promoting.

The Social Media Tip about increasing your audience reach page was posted “By Mike Armstrong”

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5 LinkedIn Marketing Tips

New post on Online Marketing Hub

5 Ways Content Marketers Can Get More Value from LinkedIn
by christopherjanb

If you only view LinkedIn as the site where you keep your digital resume and virtual business card collection, you won’t see how it really can help grow your business, expand your content’s audience, and build valuable connections.

LinkedIn is the definitive professional publishing platform and one of the largest business publishers in the world, according to Todd Wheatland, Head of Content Strategy at King Content.

In his presentation at Content Marketing World 2014, Wheatland noted that LinkedIn is often cited as the No. 1 source for new business. He pointed to content marketing phenoms Jay Baer, Joe Pulizzi, and Lee Odden, all of whom have named LinkedIn as their top source for new business as they built their multi-million-dollar companies in the last five years. It’s not just for entrepreneurs either. Wheatland’s previous employer, Kelly Services Inc., also cites LinkedIn as the top generator for new business.

What’s in a LinkedIn Group?
By now, we’ve all learned that the vast majority of LinkedIn Groups offer disappointing experiences. They are not administered well and often become filled with self-promotion that doesn’t give thought to relevance or context. However, when used correctly, Groups can be a great opportunity for content marketers. “There is huge potential if you are willing to invest the resources and time,” Wheatland said.

His keys to a successful LinkedIn Group include consistent management, dismissal of self-promoters and irrelevant content, and use of weekly email option to Group members. Take a look at some of specific recommendations and examples he offered:

1. Get rid of the garbage content

Wheatland shared some of his experience with successfully working with Groups. For example, Kelly Services Inc. once created the LinkedIn Group, HR Manager, but very quickly, it started to abandon its oversight of the Group. “It was terrible,” Wheatland said, explaining how it became filled with posts on weight-loss solutions, entries that were shared multiple times by the same members, and even a member who shared seven posts in the course of one day. “If you have more posts then comments, it’s not a good sign,” Wheatland said.

Instead of shutting down the HR Manager group, Kelly Services opted to spend 10 to 15 minutes a day moderating the cacophony of voices. If a post wasn’t on target with the professional interests of HR managers, it was killed, and the poster was removed from the Group. Remaining members started to see that the Group was being moderated and began to embrace it as a trusted resource for relevant information. Without any promotion, HR Manager soon grew to 55,000 members, with 500 or more members joining each week.

In addition, the HR Manager moderator continues to send a weekly email to members. “It’s an extremely powerful way to pull people back to your site or target,” Wheatland said. Notably from a content marketing perspective, these emails include links to Kelly Services’ content, as well as messages that encourage additional participation from Group members. The weekly HR Manager email also incorporates features like a Top 3 Posts of the Week list, and re-shares some of the questions posed in the Group to drive additional contributions to the discussion. The goal is to promote the insight of contributing members and encourage greater engagement within the Group environment.

2. Go off brand

Don’t be afraid to create a Group that might be a bit “off brand” for your business — as long as you identify it with a name that resonates with the interests of your targeted members. “It’s not about the company but about the audience,” Wheatland said. Be transparent, though, and make sure the connection to your company is readily apparent.

Kapost and HubSpot serve as are good examples of how this can be a useful strategy. Kapost created Content Marketing Academy, which serves as a learning experience for content marketers looking for advice from their peers. The Group now has more than 14,000 members, while Kapost’s own company-focused LinkedIn page only has slightly more than 1,000 followers. Similarly, HubSpot manages the Inbound Marketers Group, which boasts more than 113,000 members, compared to HubSpot’s company page, which has 70,000-plus followers.

3. Showcase your brand benefits

Late in 2013, LinkedIn re-engineered its Company pages and debuted Showcase Pages, in part to improve the foundation for its fastest growing revenue stream — sponsored posts and content, according to Wheatland.

Nested under a Company page, users can create as few or as many Showcase Pages as they want, though LinkedIn recommends a maximum of 10). Just like a Company Page, users are encouraged to be “followers” of Showcase Pages.

Wheatland says these pages can be developed for diverse purposes — not just product promotion. While you can create a Showcase for a product, you also can create one for customer service, another for a customer industry interest, and several more for geographic-specific content. The potential topics are virtually limitless, though Wheatland recommends that companies use them to Showcase only those topics that help them meet their business and operational goals.

4. Get Connected to the LinkedIn app

One of Wheatland’s favorite components of LinkedIn is its Connected app, which can function as a personalized researcher, boss, assistant, and marketer. Connected delves into users’ LinkedIn profile and activity, and can be synced with their calendar and contacts. Its features can come in handy for marketers in a variety of ways.

For example, each weekday it creates a personalized list of “15 updates you can do to engage with your connections on LinkedIn.” How can this help your business? Consider this scenario:

You schedule meeting with a new client prospect, Mary Smith at XYZ Company, for 2 p.m. Thursday.

At 10 a.m. Thursday, you receive an alert from Connected to view Mary’s profile. You show up at the meeting and ace the presentation because you were able to get background info on Mary that allowed you to tailor your discussion to her interests.

On Friday morning, Connected sends a message to alert you that Mary has a connection who works for one of your competitors. It encourages you to connect with Mary through LinkedIn to stay on her radar.

Connected also can send push-type messages and help you reach out to your connections with relevant messaging and content. For example, on weekends, Connected shares a special edition: “Five connections who were mentioned or shared content in the news over the past week.” Just click on “reach out” and can then send a personalized message to compliment those connections on their news items.

Connected also can be synced with other apps. For example, Wheatland connected it to his TripIt app. Connected now knows when Wheatland is headed to Melbourne, Australia, and can suggest that he meet with a particular connection. Connected even pre-populates an outreach message, so that he would only need to click to send a request to meet up with his connection while he’s in town.

5. Don’t forget the tried and true

Your LinkedIn connections are valuable because they serve as more than just digital business networking tools. They are part of your LinkedIn algorithm, which can help you find new connections, valuable content, and more to help you in business.

By taking a few extra steps, you can add even more value to your LinkedIn experience. For example, At CMW, Wheatland described LinkedIn as “CRM lite,” advising users to take 20 seconds when they add a connection to detail what is known about the person or the relationship.

To do this, use the relationship tab for each connection. Detail how you met or know the person, and add notes and tags. Wheatland said adding keywords to the tag section better facilitates your ongoing relationships. For example, say you tag a connection with “supply chain.” Two months later, you read an interesting article that’s relevant to the supply chain industry. You can then search for all your connections that you’ve tagged with this keyword and LinkedIn will compile a clickable list you can use to select the ones you would like to share the article with —all without having to leave the LinkedIn environment.

Todd Wheatland’s practical tips helped Content Marketing World attendees improve their LinkedIn activity. Didn’t attend the presentation or couldn’t make it to Content Marketing World this year? You can still catch up on the biggest issues, ideas, and innovations in Content Marketing. Check out our Video on Demand portal for more info.

For more on this article or content marketing in general see:
http://omhub.wordpress.com/2014/10/13/5-ways-content-marketers-can-get-more-value-from-linkedin/

5 LinkedIn Marketing Tips page posted “By Mike Armstrong”