Facebook Looks Outside Its Walls for Its Next VP Hire

News of a high-profile Facebook executive departing the company isn’t exactly new. in recent months, Facebook has witnessed the departure of Instagram founders Kevin Systrom and Mike Krieger, WhatsApp founder Jan Koum, and now their VP of Global Policy and Communications, Elliot Schrage. What is new, however, is their approach for filling the role: unlike many other senior level vacancies, Facebook is prioritizing an external hire for Schrage’s position.

Schrage’s Critical and Challenging Role

Schrage’s role has been a beleaguered one in the past year; his deliberate “wait and see” response to the Cambridge Analytica scandal was largely blamed for Facebook’s slow reaction to the news. To his credit, however, he’s also credited with much of founder Mark Zuckerberg’s Congressional testimony, where the company walked away scrutinized but relatively unscathed. Moreover, he encouraged Facebook to be more forthright about their actions (or lack thereof) surrounding election integrity. He says of his time with the company, “Leading policy and comms for hypergrowth technology companies is a joy—but it’s also intense and leaves little room for much else.

His successor will have no shortage of scandals to manage, between continued concerns about privacy (which has drawn a $1.6B fine in Europe), accusations that the platform’s algorithm suppresses conservative thought, and “Facebook fatigue,” a jaded feeling that has users reducing their use or fleeing to other platforms altogether. As Recode reported, “leadership for this unit is critical right now.” For his part, Schrage is staying on to help choose his successor, and will continue to work with Zuckerberg and Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg in an advisory capacity.

“Predominantly a Policy Role”

In searching outside the company, Facebook has a unique opportunity to address the concerns surrounding privacy and balanced viewpoints. Prospective candidates being considered reportedly include individuals based in the UK—creating a foothold that can help the social networking giant address Europe’s more stringent laws—as well as individuals with ties to conservative institutions. Schrage’s predecessor Brandee Barker, one of the few with intimate knowledge of Schrage’s stead, believes the successor should view it as “predominantly a policy role.” “They have challenges now at the governmental level internationally, in the US and the EU, and it will only continue to increase.”

Among prospective candidates seen as having the chops for the role are Clinton-era press secretary and Goldman Sachs communications head Jake Siewert, former George W. Bush chief of staff and ONE board member Josh Bolten, managing director of the International Monetary Fund and former French finance minister Christina Lagarde, and former UK Parliament member and current International Rescue Committee Head David Miliband. But it’s likely that the final decision won’t come down for some time; Facebook has no plans to make their hire before midterm elections, and will largely allow their chosen candidate to dictate their own start date. From that date forward, Facebook will be entering a new era of leadership, in more ways than one.

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The post Facebook Looks Outside Its Walls for Its Next VP Hire appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2018/10/facebook-looks-outside-its-walls-for-its-next-vp-hire/

Facebook Debuts Its Portal at a Critical and Controversial Time

Earlier this month, Facebook announced its foray into the smart speaker/camera market, the video conferencing tool Portal. Featuring high-quality speakers to allow flawless streaming from apps like Spotify or Pandora and powered by Amazon’s Alexa voice assistant, Portal stands apart in the market by prioritizing video phone calls, made through the platform’s Messenger system.

Portal’s Points of Distinction

Facebook seems excited to stake its claim on the smart speaker market—likely after a high-profile swing and miss in the smartphone market—and has announced a few distinguishing features that make its reception attractive. The “AI-powered smart camera” was developed to “free” users from the constraints of a frame; the camera will move and adjust to follow a moving target. And the announced Storytime feature, where a user can share a bedtime story through a teleprompter-like feature, makes it an additional draw for growing families separated by distance.

What Of the Portal’s Privacy?

In reporting on the product’s launch, however, Recode’s Kurt Wagner presents a crucial point for those considering buying the device: “The most important question with Portal, though, is also the most obvious: does Facebook have enough credibility to convince people to put a Facebook-powered camera and microphone in their home?” In some ways addressing Wagner’s question, NYMag’s Intelligencer column was named, “The Facebook Portal Could Be Good If Anyone But Facebook Released It.”

Facebook has been no stranger to controversy in the past year, particularly around issues of privacy. In fact, the Portal’s release announcement came days after Facebook announced a security weakness that exposed up to 50 million users’ personal information. The figure was later adjusted to 29 million, but still represents a sensitivity that Facebook seems ill-equipped to address. Consumer behavior is already adjusting to this new reality; Pew reported earlier this year that 44% of 18-29 year olds had deleted the Facebook app from their phones.

But should that Pew report be believed?

In the wake of this latest breach, VP Guy Rosen insisted the company would “do everything it can to earn users’ trust.” The observant will note that this verbiage echoes impassioned pleas from Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg made a mere seven months ago. It’s justifiable to wonder how many more times such pleas will need to be made—and how the Portal could contribute to such a problem.

Getting Ahead of the Skeptics

Perhaps anticipating worries about the Portal’s privacy measures, many questions have already been addressed. All calls will be encrypted, and will not be recorded or even seen by Facebook. The camera will not capture video when not in use, microphones will not be engaged unless expressly summoned with a “Hey Alexa,” and both can be manually shut off to prevent recording when not in use. Further, no data will be mined from conversations, and targeted ads will not be tailored based on any information shared in private calls.

Announcing these features proactively could help boost confidence in the Portal, but ultimately time will tell if these measures—combined with flashy features—will be enough to entice consumers.

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http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2018/10/facebook-debuts-its-portal-at-a-critical-and-controversial-time/

Facebook VP Carolyn Everson: The Future Of Ads On Instagram, WhatsApp

Facebook’s VP of Global Marketing Solutions, Carolyn Everson, sat down with The Wall Street Journal’s Media and Marketing Reporter Lara O’Reilly at Advertising Week and discussed, among other things, the future of Instagram and WhatsApp as far as marketers and advertisers are concerned.

IG and WhatsApp are two of the highest profile acquisitions Facebook has made, and their global success is a major part of what makes Facebook so powerful from a marketing perspective—especially Instagram, the rising star of social media.

At the same time, both platforms are becoming the subject of intense scrutiny as Facebook continues to use them as vehicles to drive ad dollars, much to the chagrin of their founders. Everson discussed the public acrimony between Facebook and its portfolio companies—check out the main takeaways, below.

[Click here to read Everson’s thoughts on the future of Facebook]

Instagram is not about to become “another Facebook” for consumers

Instagram’s co-founders recently stepped down from the company, and as the former head of Facebook’s News Feed steps into the leadership role, some have worried that Instagram will become a Facebook clone—which is exactly what many Instagram users don’t want.

Everson says that turning Instagram into “another Facebook” would be a mistake.

“We have every incentive for Instagram to have a unique value proposition… that would completely destroy its value,” she said.

Marketers, however, want a simplified backend across all Facebook platforms

While consumers may not see big changes to the Instagram user experience any time soon, Everson did note that a goal for the company was to “simplify” the infrastructure for marketers.

“We have a unified backend infrastructure so that marketers can upload their creative, we can help adapt it to different platforms… and just simplify their life,” she said.

“My team around the world is one unified team to the marketer, because a marketer doesn’t need to have four different meetings,” she added.

Instagram Stories is still the best deal for brave marketers

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O’Reilly asked what Instagram would do to increase monetization of the platform’s Stories, which has become an unexpected hit for the company.

Everson responded by noting that monetization always takes time to catch up to a new user behavior, citing the company’s switch to mobile as another recent example.

But when it comes to the prices of advertising on Stories, Everson said that the company wouldn’t raise prices arbitrarily.

“Marketers are rewarded for bravery for moving into new ad formats,” where the prices are just less expensive, she said. “The real savvy marketers have really figured that out and are shifting rapidly into Stories.”

[We’ve been telling you to invest in Stories for awhile now, by the way.]

Small business is the driving force of advertising on WhatsApp

Facebook has moved more cautiously with messaging app WhatsApp when it comes to advertising. Everson pointed out that it took time to understand the “consumer value proposition” of the app, which is now revealing itself without Facebook creating a tool to manufacture one.

“People are already communicating with businesses.You go to India—the majority of businesses have WhatsApp accounts, they don’t have websites,” she said. “We saw that people wanted to communicate with businesses… we saw that behavior and started to build out those tools.”

Expect 2019 to bring changes for WhatsApp

Everson emphasized that the company would be “very cautious and slow moving” on WhatsApp overall—but that 2019 would be a year of new things for the app, such as targeted ads.

“What we’ve talked about publicly is that in 2019 we’ll talk about ads in Status [the WhatsApp version of Stories] in WhatsApp,” she said.

For the full conversation, head over to Facebook Business to watch the video.

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http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2018/10/facebook-vp-carolyn-everson-the-future-of-ads-on-instagram-whatsapp/

Facebook VP: 5 Things To Know About The Future Of Facebook

It’s Advertising Week in New York City, and of course everyone wants to know what Facebook is planning on doing to help shape the future of digital ads, marketing, and content creation in general.

Luckily, the week started off with an insightful interview of Facebook’s VP of Global Marketing Solutions, Carolyn Everson, conducted by The Wall Street Journal’s Media and Marketing Reporter Lara O’Reilly.

Since the conversation was long and detailed, in this post we’ll detail the biggest takeaways from Everson’s thoughts on Facebook’s present and future. Here’s what the VP thinks about shadow profiles, third-party data, the midterm elections, and more.

Facebook is working to reassure marketers and advertisers after the latest hack

A recent “sophisticated attack” by hackers allowed them the ability to control around 50 million Facebook accounts, in another major blow to the world’s biggest social media network.

According to Everson, many of the marketers and advertisers she has spoken to have shown “empathy” for Facebook, understanding that cyberattacks are among the biggest threats that any company can face.

As for how Facebook has worked to ensure user and marketer safety, Everson said that the business team “put out a very practical guide over the weekend” with best practices, including understanding who the administrators are on an account. Everson said that Facebook ensured marketers that credit card information “could not have been taken by the hackers.”

A major cultural shift is underway at Facebook

In emphasizing that Facebook’s “entire existence” is to come in and serve people and marketers, Everson noted that the company taking responsibility for its power and influence marked a “cultural shift.”

“At the end of the day we have a responsibility to people,” Everson said, noting that recent scandals and issues like foreign interference in elections and misinformation was driving the company to change in a way that Cambridge Analytica couldn’t.

Between this recent hack and the larger questions of information and trust, Facebook is trying to change the perception that they don’t have users’ best interest at heart.

Facebook is deciding whether to use “shadow information” to advertise to users

Another area where Facebook has been getting heat is in their use of “shadow profiles” and other non-user data, as well as the information users provide for two-factor authentication, in advertising.

Everson talks are underway at Facebook to decide how best to use this information—if at all—going forward.

“We’re going to fix it,” she said. “Either we need to be much clearer about the fact that we’re utilizing this data because it’s not totally clear to users… Or we will no longer utilize it for ads.”

The issue here, according to Everson, isn’t that data is being used for advertising. It’s about transparency and control.

“The vast majority of people want their data to be utilized, but they want to be in control of it… because they don’t want their time wasted,” Everson said.

Facebook is working to ensure all data used on the site is “ethically sourced”

Facebook recently ended a major deal between the company and major data brokers, and as of Oct. 1 is no longer facilitating an automatic upload from a third-party data source in the U.S. (this change happened earlier in Europe). Why?

“Where did [this data] come from? Did consumers give permission to have that data be utilized in such a way? There is a burden of responsibility placed on the marketer,” said Everson. “… Our goal with this is to ensure that whatever data is utilized it ethically sourced and marketers have permission to use it.”

The platform learned a ton from the 2016 elections

Everson said that Facebook is “much more prepared” for the 2018 midterm compared to the 2016 presidential election, and has done a lot better with significant elections that took place around the world in the last two years.

According to Everson, Facebook is focusing on removing fake accounts, identifying operations of foreign interference, fighting fake news and misinformation (and drastically downgrading the spread of fake viral posts), reducing civic spam, and working with law enforcement on potential threats, 11th-hour and otherwise.

Facebook Business posted the conversation in full, and you can watch it here.

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The post Facebook VP: 5 Things To Know About The Future Of Facebook appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2018/10/facebook-vp-5-things-to-know-about-the-future-of-facebook/

Facebook Has Been Hurting Instagram’s Growth — And It May Be Intentional

This week, Instagram co-founders Kevin Systrom and Mike Krieger announced their decision to leave the company they sold to Facebook six years ago. Subsequent reports of a fall out between IG’s visionaries and parent company Facebook are exposing a nasty rift.

For months, it has appeared that things between Instagram and Facebook, and between Systrom and Mark Zuckerberg, couldn’t be better. Both social media platforms have benefitted massively from being intertwined with one another—Facebook has boosted IG’s profile and instituted lucrative marketing changes, and IG has become the hip, less-bloated alternative to its scandal-ridden big brother.

Changes to the relationship between the two platforms, however, reportedly incensed Systrom and Krieger and induced them to announce abrupt departures.

When Facebook bought Instagram, there was a public and sustained effort for Facebook to stay out of Instagram’s way. This autonomy allowed Instagram to avoid a lot of the backlash that Facebook has received in recent years.

As of late, that mindset has changed, and not to Instagram’s benefit.

How Facebook kneecapped Instagram

You might think that Facebook would want to continue to promote and champion Instagram, the company’s crowning acquisition, considering it was recently named social media’s most-loved platform and use is skyrocketing.

According to Recode, that’s not the case: Facebook recently dialed back how much it promotes IG within the Facebook app, a decision that came directly from Zuckerberg. This apparently affected weekly referrals—a drop measured in hundreds of thousands of users.

Facebook also began downplaying the role Instagram has played in photo sharing across both platforms. In the old days, photos shared to Facebook via Instagram were actually labeled as such, reminding people that IG is the place to create and share your masterfully edited (or even just your #nofilter) photos. That label is gone now, making it look as though users are posting photos directly to Facebook even when they’re not.

This may not seem like the biggest deal. Facebook owns Instagram, so if you post to Instagram, you are in a sense posting to Facebook. But to Instagram employees, including the founders, it looked as though Facebook was taking credit for engagement that they weren’t driving.

Whether you want to look at this as Facebook simply doing less for IG than before, or Facebook wanting to take more credit, it drove a wedge between the higher-ups that couldn’t be repaired.

What does this mean for Instagram?

Adam Mosseri, head of product at Instagram, a former Facebook exec, and reportedly part of Zuckerberg’s “inner circle,” will take over IG.

Not surprisingly, the loss of the platform’s creators and the installation of an extension of Zuckerberg has some worried that Instagram is “about to suck.”

If Instagram does begin to suck, however, that won’t happen for some time. The platform has too much momentum as a social media powerhouse at the moment, and the kind of institutional changes that Mosseri and Zuck might come up with would take a long time to implement.

But if IG soon begins to resemble its parent company in ways that have turned off many former Facebook users, expect social media historians to point to this moment as the beginning of the end.

Learn the latest trends, insights and best practices from the brightest minds in media and technology. Sign up for SMW Insider to watch full-length sessions from official Social Media Week conferences live and on-demand.

The post Facebook Has Been Hurting Instagram’s Growth — And It May Be Intentional appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2018/09/facebook-has-been-hurting-instagrams-growth-and-it-may-be-intentional/

Facebook Stories Hits 300 Million Users and Rolls Out Ads Globally

Today, Facebook has announced that it’s rolling out Facebook Stories Ads to advertisers globally.

More than 300 million people use Facebook Stories and Messenger Stories every day.

Since Snapchat debuted the Stories format back in 2013, it has taken over the social media landscape. Facebook first introduced the format to one of its properties in 2016 with the launch of Instagram Stories and has since launched similar updates across Whatsapp, Messenger and Facebook itself.

And the format is still growing across the board. Data from Facebook IQ found that 68 percent of people say they use stories on at least three apps regularly, and 63 percent plan to use stories more in the future.

The value of Facebook Stories ads

An Ipsos survey discovered that 62 percent of people said they became more interested in a brand or product after seeing it in a story and Facebook says that “brands testing Facebook Stories ads are already seeing results”.

Stories ads also have the power to help your brand grow via word of mouth, with 38 percent of people surveyed saying that after seeing a product or service in a story they talked to someone about it.

In addition, the survey found that more than half of people said they’re making more online purchases as a result of seeing stories and 34 percent said they went to a store to look for a product they had seen in stories ads.

Facebook says that both Tentree, a sustainable, eco-friendly clothing company, and Skout, a dating app,  found that adding Facebook Stories to their Instagram Stories ad campaigns resulted in more customer actions at a lower cost.

The challenges and opportunities with Stories

The audiences on Facebook Stories could be an issue for advertisers. 300 million people use stories across Facebook and Messenger whereas more than 400 million use Instagram Stories daily, and 1.47 billion use Facebook daily.

However, the newness of Facebook Stories could appeal to advertisers seeking a first mover advantage with the format. Brandon Doyle, the founder of digital agency Wallaroo Media, has been experimenting with Facebook Stories ads for over a month, and recently told Digiday:

“CPM and conversion rates have been the best of any placements over the course of the last month, probably due to the fact that the competition is lower there”.

Digiday also revealed that flight-booking service Hopper has seen both Facebook Stories and Instagram Stories ads performing better than ads in Facebook’s news feed and in Instagram’s feed. In fact, the results for Hopper have been so great that the businesses has been “prioritizing designing ads for the Stories format, then adapting them to the other formats”.

Getting started with Facebook Stories ads

Facebook has launched Stories Ads to help businesses reach more people and Stories Ads will be available to advertisers as an additional placement to News Feed or Instagram Stories ad campaigns. Facebook reports that Stories Ads will soon be coming to Messenger soon too.

Facebook Stories ads deliver your message in a fullscreen, immersive environment. Additionally, Facebook Stories ads support every objective that’s currently available for Instagram Stories ads, including:

  • Reach
  • Brand awareness
  • Video views
  • App install
  • Conversion
  • Traffic
  • Lead generation

Facebook Stories ads have been rolled out globally today. To get started with Stories ads, head over to Facebook Ads Manager and create your ad, then when it comes to selecting ‘Placements’ you’ll see the option to include Facebook Stories:

Want to learn more about the Stories format?

With more than one billion people using Stories and vertical video formats across Facebook, Instagram, IGTV — and even YouTube… Have you wondered what this means for your business? We recently partnered up with writer, maker and marketer, Owen Williams, to and how to get started in a four-part email series.

http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/bufferapp/~3/ilIBpcNSRf8/facebook-stories-ads

Facebook and LinkedIn Join the SMWLDN Lineup

Social Media Week London 2018 is fast approaching, and we’re continuing to bolster the lineup with incredible speakers and panelists to discuss new ideas, trends, and innovations in social media, publishing, and marketing.

SAVE UP TO £100 BEFORE PRICES INCREASE!

This week alone we’re announcing two new events, hosted by two of the biggest platforms in the industry: Facebook and LinkedIn.

  • On Thursday, November 15 at 12 p.m., Dan Robinson, Group Director at Facebook will host a talk called “Easy Come, Easy Go: The Disruption of Loyalty.” Robinson, who has been with Facebook for the last 6+ years, is uniquely suited to discuss how the future of loyalty between consumers, brands, and platforms is contingent upon meaningful interactions between all parties.
  • On Friday, November 16 at 12 p.m., Jason Miller, the Global Content Marketing Leader at LinkedIn will delve into marketing across the entire funnel with “How LinkedIn Uses LinkedIn For Marketing.” Miller has years of firsthand knowledge on how to reach and engage customers with native advertising, paid and organic content, and creative, practical use of video—and he promises to share best practices with attendees.

These are just two of the featured speakers we’ll have at #SMWLDN this year, representing BBC Radio, Dataminr, Reddit, and many more. Check out the full list of speakers.

In its ninth year, Social Media Week London will run from November 14-16, 2018 at the QEII Centre. Have you gotten your passes yet?

Get your tickets now and save over £100 on the Premium or Standard Passes over the walkup price!

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The post Facebook and LinkedIn Join the SMWLDN Lineup appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2018/09/facebook-and-linkedin-join-the-smwldn-lineup/

5 Reasons Why You Shouldn’t Buy Fake Followers

Big follower numbers on social media look impressive. To achieve that goal, many people turn to fake followers, which are imprecisely referred to as bots.

If you’re growing frustrated with a client who only cares about followers and likes, you may be tempted to pay for fake followers. After all, even if you actively fight against bots and report them, there’s no way to remove every fake account that follows you. Why not take advantage of this inherent flaw for your advantage?

Actively courting fake followers may give you a hollow short-term gain, but it’s one that means nothing to those who know not to rely on an easily manipulated metric.

Theoretically, having tons of followers means that people are interested in your brand and having a massive following will make your following grow event bigger by giving your page more exposure.

In reality, that may have been the case at one point, but it hasn’t been the case for a long time. It’s been said a million times, but it’s worth repeating: organic reach is almost non-existent, especially for those who don’t already follow your brand. Additionally, the fact that followers can be bought isn’t a secret.

Consumers are getting savvier. While it may make sense for Wendy’s to have over 2.7 million Twitter followers and over 8.5 million likes on Facebook, it would be suspicious for a small mom-and-pop restaurant to get anywhere near those numbers under almost all circumstances.

Here are five reasons why you shouldn’t invest in fake followers.

1. Your followers are a reflection on your content quality.

Many social media users will go through your followers to see who you attract and make sure your account is legitimate. If you aren’t one to follow many accounts, this may be the starting point for your followers find other businesses and people who provide similar or complementary content to what you provide.

Those who are interested in your brand and go through your followers will become suspicious if you have too many accounts that look sketchy or are obviously bots set up for the sole purpose of sharing other people’s content.

While you may gamble on the fact that not many people care about your followers, word gets around on the internet and you will be watched.

2. Buying fake followers will get you banned.

Is temporary success worth the risk of permanent expulsion from your chosen social media platforms?

Purchasing fake followers is the digital media equivalent of an athlete taking steroids. You may get caught in hindsight, but when your shady practices catch up with you there will be significant blowback.

As of May 2018, Facebook had closed 583 million fake profiles. In July 2018, The Washington Post reported Twitter had suspended 70 million suspected fakes. It’s only a matter of time before the social media platforms more aggressively pursue those who have an unusually large number of fake followers.

Citing the fact that this practice is widespread or that “everyone else is doing it” will only make things worse. It didn’t work with your mother, it doesn’t work when someone breaks the law, and it won’t win you any fans.

3. Followers/Likes matter less than they used to.

We all love the validation that seeing a new follower gives, but the harsh reality is that a simple follow means nothing. Engagement is what we need to focus on. It’s more important to have 100 engaged followers than 500,000 that you purchased from a click farm.

4. It dilutes the accuracy of your analytics.

If you bought a million followers, but only 1,000 are legitimate and respond to your posts, you have an engagement rate of 0.1 percent. That’s significantly less impressive and shows the pointlessness in bragging about following size.

In contrast, a company that has 1,000 followers and has 200 engaged users has an engagement rate of 20 percent. While these numbers would be extremely low for an international or national brand, they are actually pretty good numbers for a local business.

5. It’s a waste of money.

You’re better of spending potential bot money elsewhere. Sure, there are websites that lure you with promises of thousands of followers for a small fee. However, are you willing to use a perfectly good 20 dollars for an imaginary temporary victory?

There’s no good reason to buy fake followers. You may get a dopamine rush from your increasing follower count, but fake followers are nothing more than buying an award to show off because you didn’t want to take the time or effort to earn it yourself. It may take a while for people to catch on, but once they find out you will lose all credibility and end up digging yourself out of a hole of your own making.

 

Learn the latest trends, insights and best practices from the brightest minds in media and technology. Sign up for SMW Insider to watch full-length sessions from official Social Media Week conferences live and on-demand.

The post 5 Reasons Why You Shouldn’t Buy Fake Followers appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2018/09/5-reasons-why-you-shouldnt-buy-fake-followers/

People Say They’re Deleting Facebook, But Are They Really?

A recent poll shows that a good number of people, especially young people, are joining the #DeleteFacebook app from their phone. But here’s why no one, from Facebook to marketers to grandmothers who just figured out how Facebook works, should be worried.

According to the Pew Research Center, about 26 percent of polled adults said they’d deleted the Facebook app from their phone in the past year. Additionally, 42 percent said they’d taken a weeks-long break from the social media giant.

Young people in particular—18-29-year-olds—were much more likely to have deleted the app, which sounds like a problem for future growth.

And yet Facebook’s daily active user base has been steady at around 185 million for the last four quarters.

This is a good time to remind you that a poll, even one conducted by a prestigious organization like Pew Research, doesn’t always accurately reflect reality.

For one thing, the poll doesn’t check to see if users actually deleted Facebook’s app from their phone. We’re simply taking people’s word for it; Facebook, meanwhile, has hard numbers to back up their data. Pew also might not be able to take into account people they polled who deleted the app, then downloaded it again.

It’s also possible that people are continuing to join Facebook at around the same rate that users might be leaving it.

Finally, keep in mind that people who delete the app from their phone are by no means necessarily not using Facebook. They can still access the site from a desktop, or visit Facebook directly from the browsers on their phone. The site may not run as smoothly on an iPhone or Android device’s browser, but the mobile version is perfectly usable.

Facebook’s slowing user base growth is an issue for the platform, and Mark Zuckerberg’s company has had to make major changes after scandals relating to privacy and Russian influence in the 2016 election shook the public’s faith. But a supposed quarter of users “deleting” the app from their phone is not an outsized problem.

For marketers, the biggest dilemma isn’t that they don’t have enough potential users on Facebook to view their content—it’s getting their content seen above the rest in the wake of the recent algorithm shakeup.

Learn the latest trends, insights and best practices from the brightest minds in media and technology. Sign up for SMW Insider to watch full-length sessions from official Social Media Week conferences live and on-demand.

The post People Say They’re Deleting Facebook, But Are They Really? appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2018/09/people-say-theyre-deleting-facebook-but-are-they-really/

People Say They’re Deleting Facebook, But Are They Really?

A recent poll shows that a good number of people, especially young people, are joining the #DeleteFacebook app from their phone. But here’s why no one, from Facebook to marketers to grandmothers who just figured out how Facebook works, should be worried.

According to the Pew Research Center, about 26 percent of polled adults said they’d deleted the Facebook app from their phone in the past year. Additionally, 42 percent said they’d taken a weeks-long break from the social media giant.

Young people in particular—18-29-year-olds—were much more likely to have deleted the app, which sounds like a problem for future growth.

And yet Facebook’s daily active user base has been steady at around 185 million for the last four quarters.

This is a good time to remind you that a poll, even one conducted by a prestigious organization like Pew Research, doesn’t always accurately reflect reality.

For one thing, the poll doesn’t check to see if users actually deleted Facebook’s app from their phone. We’re simply taking people’s word for it; Facebook, meanwhile, has hard numbers to back up their data. Pew also might not be able to take into account people they polled who deleted the app, then downloaded it again.

It’s also possible that people are continuing to join Facebook at around the same rate that users might be leaving it.

Finally, keep in mind that people who delete the app from their phone are by no means necessarily not using Facebook. They can still access the site from a desktop, or visit Facebook directly from the browsers on their phone. The site may not run as smoothly on an iPhone or Android device’s browser, but the mobile version is perfectly usable.

Facebook’s slowing user base growth is an issue for the platform, and Mark Zuckerberg’s company has had to make major changes after scandals relating to privacy and Russian influence in the 2016 election shook the public’s faith. But a supposed quarter of users “deleting” the app from their phone is not an outsized problem.

For marketers, the biggest dilemma isn’t that they don’t have enough potential users on Facebook to view their content—it’s getting their content seen above the rest in the wake of the recent algorithm shakeup.

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The post People Say They’re Deleting Facebook, But Are They Really? appeared first on Social Media Week.

http://socialmediaweek.org/blog/2018/09/people-say-theyre-deleting-facebook-but-are-they-really/